MB

 

Members Login
Username 
 
Password 
    Remember Me  
Post Info TOPIC: Crosby Marina


Status: Offline
Posts: 459
Date:
RE: Crosby Marina


At the risk of going off topic - I've tried and failed with digiscoping and my kit is on a well known site finishing at 7pm tonight [no.gif]. I know a scope is considered a requirement but currently I'm happy with some good bins [Hawkes - so not as good as swaros etc but better than I'd used before] plus a 400mm lens - it means anything I can see with the bins will be ID able on a photo...

Then I'll save up/sell the kids for a light scope and a 500mm F4 lens...

__________________
Building my lifers


Status: Offline
Posts: 3486
Date:

sid ashton wrote:

OK guys I understand all that you say about photographers but let me add a couple of points. I believe that there wasn't just one big lens at very close quarters to the Phal yesterday but 4 or 5 - eventually, despite its otherwise forgiving nature the bird did a runner. It obviously wanted to be on the boating lake because it had returned and was feeding happily later on when there was just one other birder and myself present.

I appreciate that a lot of birders are also photographers - my birding friend is one herself but she would always observe correct field craft by not alarming the bird and not disrupting other folks' enjoyment of the moment. I believe that this would be your way John - don't expect that you upset too many folk jogging around Hollingworth trying to get pics of the diver wink.gif. I also appreciate what you say about taking hours when you get home going through your shots - in a similar way I used to spend hours in the dark room perfecting my prints in predigital days when using a full roll of 36 shots was a luxury. I did enjoy the photos of the Penny Slav that you sent to me and they are saved in my collection for future viewing.

So points made - now where's the best place to buy one of these digi camera jobbies? Promise I won't buy one of those motor drive gadgets to annoy everyone else in the hide biggrin.gif





no motordrives these days,they are all 6 or 7 frames a second,like you i used to hate the 36 film slide days,i was scared of pressing the shutter as it was 7 everytime i did.jessops have gone very competitive recently and quite often are as cheap as online retailers,you will need a wazzin lens though,and a big bag,add a second camera body,your telescope,tripod,bins,and you can see why i was sweatin runnin round hollingsworth.biggrin.gif

__________________

http://www.flickr.com/photos/johntymon/



Status: Offline
Posts: 1855
Date:

OK guys I understand all that you say about photographers but let me add a couple of points. I believe that there wasn't just one big lens at very close quarters to the Phal yesterday but 4 or 5 - eventually, despite its otherwise forgiving nature the bird did a runner. It obviously wanted to be on the boating lake because it had returned and was feeding happily later on when there was just one other birder and myself present.

I appreciate that a lot of birders are also photographers - my birding friend is one herself but she would always observe correct field craft by not alarming the bird and not disrupting other folks' enjoyment of the moment. I believe that this would be your way John - don't expect that you upset too many folk jogging around Hollingworth trying to get pics of the diver wink.gif. I also appreciate what you say about taking hours when you get home going through your shots - in a similar way I used to spend hours in the dark room perfecting my prints in predigital days when using a full roll of 36 shots was a luxury. I did enjoy the photos of the Penny Slav that you sent to me and they are saved in my collection for future viewing.

So points made - now where's the best place to buy one of these digi camera jobbies? Promise I won't buy one of those motor drive gadgets to annoy everyone else in the hide biggrin.gif

__________________


Status: Offline
Posts: 3486
Date:

Ian McKerchar wrote:

smile.gif no shooting here Sid, just sometimes photographers get a bad name when it's not justified. Of course it seems that nowadays plenty birders carry dslr's so most fall into the photographer bracket. Being a digiscoper I'd be backing away to get a shot! There are though apparently lots of examples of poor fieldcraft, particularly from 'our friends' but I have to admit to never witnessing it myself though not generally twitching anymore I'm unlikely to I suppose? Back in the day though...wink.gif





Ian is 100% correct
A lot of birders are photographers now,look at me .I class myself as a birder,but 80% of the time now im trying to get a picture as well,it becomes like twiching ,a bit addictive,and sometimes the moment takes over the common sense. like me the other week charging round hollingworth trying to get in front of the diver,i must have looked like a demented jogger,carrying about 40lb on my back,trying to runconfuse.gifpast the diver when it was under,only to find it had come up another 50 yards further on.i was weezing like an azmatic pit ponydisbelief.gifbut got some nice shots for all my efffort.
A lot of birders don't realise the time photographers put in at home afterwards.The Diver for instance,i spent 2 hours getting 200 shots,but when i got home it took 4 hours to sort,process,and get about 6 good ones ,to send to Ian for the site,and to send to my freinds,who like to see my shots,so that photographer taking the phalarope was probably still working on them shots when all the birders there were out with thier families having a meal ,or just relaxing watching telly.In general it takes twice as long messing at home with the photos,as the time actually birding so think on when everyone is complaining about the shutter nutter firing a thousand shots off ,at a yellow legged gull,in truth hes working his nuts off ,so everyone can see how these birds look.smile.gif

__________________

http://www.flickr.com/photos/johntymon/



Status: Offline
Posts: 15337
Date:

no shooting here Sid, just sometimes photographers get a bad name when it's not justified. Of course it seems that nowadays plenty birders carry dslr's so most fall into the photographer bracket. Being a digiscoper I'd be backing away to get a shot! There are though apparently lots of examples of poor fieldcraft, particularly from 'our friends' but I have to admit to never witnessing it myself though not generally twitching anymore I'm unlikely to I suppose? Back in the day though...

__________________

Forum administrator and owner



Status: Offline
Posts: 459
Date:

I went to see the Phalarope - kids in tow [and ordered to stay on the path and keep quiet which they did thankfully!] first thing this morning en route to their dancing classes!

It was an amazing experience to see a bird so completely oblivious - I got some record shots from about 12m when it swam my way and even when someone else got to within about 5m it didn't seem too spooked. The light was poor first thing and I only ever want record shots without disturbing the birds but I did really cringe when the other chap went quite so close, if he'd stayed still and waited it would have come to him!

I've witnessed some pretty poor behaviour a couple of time now but not always by photographers so I guess its all down to the individuals no matter what they're carrying scope or lens wise!

__________________
Building my lifers


Status: Offline
Posts: 1855
Date:

Don't shoot the messenger Ian - I was just reporting what the guys I met told me wink.gif

__________________


Status: Offline
Posts: 15337
Date:

Having seen the Grey Phal yesterday as I was at Seaforth anyhow, I seriously doubt our 'photographic friends' could have disturbed this individual. It was then, and I believe certainly was earlier today atleast also, oblivious to those watching it and was swimming right up to folk, blinkin' long lenses or not.

As Pete Berry put, it was 'strokeable' at times of it's own accord. Sometimes birders can get the wrong impression of photographers when in instances like this (and last years Steppe Grey Shrike in Lincolnshire) the bird comes to them yet birders misinterpret it as typical photographer behaviour, harassing the subject. They're not all bad, but some of them...

__________________

Forum administrator and owner



Status: Offline
Posts: 1855
Date:

I was in Liverpool today helping our daughter move to a new flat and found the time late on to go over to Crosby - well actually they were putting the lights out when I got there at 15.30. Met a couple of birders in the car park who said that the Grey Phalarope had been present on the boating lake, as reported earlier in the day but it had been flushed by our photograhic "friends". hmm.gif Still thought it was worthwhile having a look and there it was at the far end of the boating lake from the car park - it was still a tad flighty but looked as though it was settling in for the night. On the way back to the car spotted 3 Shag, a single juv Red Breasted Merganser and a pair of Golden Eye on the main marina then back into Liverpool centre in time for teabiggrin.gif

-- Edited by sid ashton on Saturday 28th of November 2009 11:09:03 PM

__________________


Status: Offline
Posts: 828
Date:

Pallid Swift appeared with large group of Common Swifts yesterday afternoon - just ahead of rain. Bears out Rob's theory!

At Seaforth 800+ Common Terns joined by 1 Arctic, 1 Little and 1 Roseate Tern.

__________________
www.winwickbirder.blogspot.com


Status: Offline
Posts: 1855
Date:

Rob Smallwood wrote:

My theory stands!




Stick with it Rob - I'm with you smile.gifwink.gif

__________________


Status: Offline
Posts: 1149
Date:

My theory stands!

__________________
Rob


Status: Offline
Posts: 5
Date:

sid ashton wrote:


Perhaps it never left - just that there may have been a few more birders today looking for the Terns??

Simon Glinn wrote:

It's reported as back tonight ...











Not sure about that - some very good eyes (not mine! I saw the bird the previous weekend) spent a large part of last Sunday looking for it without success ...

__________________
++++++++++++++++++


Status: Offline
Posts: 1855
Date:


Perhaps it never left - just that there may have been a few more birders today looking for the Terns??
Simon Glinn wrote:

It's reported as back tonight ...








__________________


Status: Offline
Posts: 5
Date:

It's reported as back tonight ...

__________________
++++++++++++++++++


Status: Offline
Posts: 1855
Date:

Tim Wilcox wrote:

It would then be picked up again high up above the line of the cranes where it sometimes seemed to 'hover' and jink. The flight was more varied and acrobatic than that of the regular Swifts present.



Tim

The flight pattern as you described it was exactly how I saw it - quite distinctive.


-- Edited by sid ashton on Wednesday 13th of May 2009 01:09:33 PM

__________________


Status: Offline
Posts: 1030
Date:

I successfully twitched this last Tuesday - stopping at Ikea Warrington on the way (I like the casual approach to twitching!) The weather was foul and it was zooming in low right over the heads of the Seaforth crew at their hide but it would then instantly disappear as one tried to track it through the fence. It would then be picked up again high up above the line of the cranes where it sometimes seemed to 'hover' and jink. The flight was more varied and acrobatic than that of the regular Swifts present.

__________________


Status: Offline
Posts: 1149
Date:

Rob Smallwood wrote:

My theory is that this bird is associating with local swifts, so may hang around for a while - no idea if common & Pallid ever hybridise - if so watch out for some really tricky id's in the autumn.

Many swifts must have passed through the area whilst this one has been here...






Of course posting this was it's cue to depat.....evileye.gif

__________________
Rob


Status: Offline
Posts: 1149
Date:

Definiely feeds lower in poor weather - the last really calm sunny day, a week ago the bird wasn not seen after early morning.

__________________
Rob


Status: Offline
Posts: 1568
Date:

sid ashton wrote:



But questions for eveyone - we know that Swifts live on the wing - some of these birds including the Pallid have been around Crosby/Seaforth for more than a week now. There is obviously plenty for them to eat - how long are they likely to stay? - without being specific are there suitable nesting sites around the area? Just a couple of questions I have been asking myself whilst cutting the grass since I got homeyawn.gifyawn.gif

Anyone any suggestions as to their next possible move?

-- Edited by sid ashton on Saturday 9th of May 2009 04:43:00 PM






Hi Sid. There will be swifts over the area all summer with plenty of possible nest sites in the area. Some interesting comments on UK Swifts about the habits of the Pallid. One member reckons that the bird is 'roosting' over the lake and coming down to lower levels early and late and staying at lower levels when it's overcast. Don't know how that fits in with what people on here have noticed, but if it's true I'm hoping for poor weather when I'm at home next Tuesday. please.gif

__________________


Status: Offline
Posts: 1149
Date:

My theory is that this bird is associating with local swifts, so may hang around for a while - no idea if common & Pallid ever hybridise - if so watch out for some really tricky id's in the autumn.

Many swifts must have passed through the area whilst this one has been here...

__________________
Rob


Status: Offline
Posts: 1855
Date:

Geoff if you think I had a long wait there was a bloke with a big lens in the car park who I overheard telling his mate that he would get some decent shots when the Swifts settled on the bushesdisbelief.gifdisbelief.gif he's probably still waiting.

But questions for eveyone - we know that Swifts live on the wing - some of these birds including the Pallid have been around Crosby/Seaforth for more than a week now. There is obviously plenty for them to eat - how long are they likely to stay? - without being specific are there suitable nesting sites around the area? Just a couple of questions I have been asking myself whilst cutting the grass since I got homeyawn.gifyawn.gif

Anyone any suggestions as to their next possible move?

-- Edited by sid ashton on Saturday 9th of May 2009 04:43:00 PM

__________________


Status: Offline
Posts: 552
Date:

Fancy waiting nearly three hours for something that needed colour in it's cheeks.smile.gif
Well done Sid

__________________


Status: Offline
Posts: 1855
Date:

Couldn't resist another look at the Pallid Swift - arrived Crosby 06.15 had to wait until 09.00 but well worth the wait - the bird flew off the marina into the reserve directly over our heads. If anyone else is going over today there are a lot more Common Swifts about but same as on Wednesday it does seem to keep itslf separate from the pack - otherwise would be tricky to pick out.

__________________


Status: Offline
Posts: 552
Date:

"We Three" called in after Inner Marsh and New Brighton area, but did not see it at 3.30pm. One guy said he last saw it at noon - don't know how long he had been there leaning on the railings!! Tried for the prom, but it was too windy, so settled for a bad traffic drive homecry.gif

__________________


Status: Offline
Posts: 1855
Date:

Yep, Pete that's how it goes sometimes I shall have to be content with yesterday's good sightings - just a pity that our friend didn't see the bird today - she missed the Osprey as well disbelief.gifdisbelief.gif

__________________


Status: Offline
Posts: 459
Date:
...


I know I should be pleased just to have seen such an amazing bird but I just double checked my hopeful shots from tonight and I even got a passable [just] record shot!

-- Edited by Pete Welch on Thursday 7th of May 2009 09:55:06 PM

__________________
Building my lifers


Status: Offline
Posts: 459
Date:
RE: Crosby Marina


I went across tonight - left it far too late but it was showing against the grey storm clouds and the sides of the warehouse well from 8.25pm until I gave up at about 8.45pm. Spoke to a couple of chaps who'd been watching it since 6pm so you were unlucky Sid.

__________________
Building my lifers


Status: Offline
Posts: 1855
Date:

Couldn't resist another chance of the Pallid Swift today - we had previously organised a visit to Seaforth so it was a good opportunity for the one member of our party who hadn't seen the bird to get on to it. Despite two visits 07.30- 09.30 and 16.30 - 18.00 we didn't manage it. However when we first arrived this morning we had the amazing experience of "flying with Swifts" - there were dozens in the marina car park flying really low and close to us, amazing. Oh, we also had an Osprey flying over heading North.

-- Edited by sid ashton on Thursday 7th of May 2009 10:06:39 PM

__________________


Status: Offline
Posts: 1855
Date:

Eventually managed to get over to Crosby this afternoon - good views of the Pallid Swift at the Northern End of the marina and then over the reserve- strange to see a "brown" Swift to start with but then able to distinguish the diagnostic features. biggrin.gifbiggrin.gif

Also several White Wags, Wheatear, Black Redstart(f) and one of those little birds that we don't mention for now - all on the grass safely "behind bars" on the reserve and Little Gulls and Common Tern over.

-- Edited by sid ashton on Wednesday 6th of May 2009 06:43:34 PM

__________________


Status: Offline
Posts: 428
Date:

monday 4.05.09
We got the palid swift liferbiggrin.gif at 3.00pm from the car park after just arriving.apparantly it had just been over tother side of fence but greatfully came right over our heads and all the twitchers came running.Great views of a very rare bird for merseyside.
oh and almost forgot a little gull also over the marina.biggrin.gif

-- Edited by Gary Gorner on Tuesday 5th of May 2009 06:56:52 AM

-- Edited by Gary Gorner on Tuesday 5th of May 2009 06:58:36 AM

__________________
THE GREAT THING ABOUT BIRDING ISNT JUST THE BIRDS


Status: Offline
Posts: 2184
Date:

Present fot it's 5th day, a record in the UK (for a healthy bird, ie. not taken into care). Get down there, only 40 mins from Chorlton, it wont be around forever. It came so close you couldn't focus your bins at times and could be picked out with the naked eye. It almost knocked my hat off and parted my hair after Rob & Sonia left this morning biggrin.gif.

-- Edited by Pete Hines on Monday 4th of May 2009 11:38:06 PM

__________________
Updated birding videos on You Tube https://www.youtube.com/c/PeteHinesbirding


Status: Offline
Posts: 1678
Date:

Paul Wilson wrote:

Rob Thorpe wrote:

Great views of the Pallid Swift at 11:40 today near the marina wink.gif




You must have been there when Sue F and I were there. They were good views - much easier to find our first Pallid Swift than I thought it would be!





I was the one sat in my car with the heaters on, waiting for all the twitchers (i'm definitely not a twitcher wink.gif) to get on to the Pallid. It was very cold out there today, it felt more like January than May!

__________________


Status: Offline
Posts: 670
Date:

Rob Thorpe wrote:

Great views of the Pallid Swift at 11:40 today near the marina wink.gif




You must have been there when Sue F and I were there. They were good views - much easier to find our first Pallid Swift than I thought it would be!



__________________

My bird photos collection on Flickr and My Elton Reservoir highlights collection.



Status: Offline
Posts: 1678
Date:

Great views of the Pallid Swift at 11:40 today near the marina wink.gif

__________________


Status: Offline
Posts: 839
Date:

I too caught up with the Pallid Swift yesterday around 7pm (I must have just missed you Rob!!)

As Rob says, it did exactly the same for me by following the Common Swifts around the Marina and then following them towards Seaforth where it gave great views as it almost hung overhead.

You really need to go and see this bird to appreciate the difference as there really is no comparison when seen well!!!

It stood out like a "sore thumb" with it's sandy brown plumage and shows much more white on it's face than a Common Swift.



__________________


Status: Offline
Posts: 1149
Date:

Still present and showing well this morning. Well worth the trip if anyone is kicking their heels his damp BH.

(PS - Andy - this one will change your mind - it is really distinct, and gives great views overhead. A tip for anyone going, yesterday the bird was nearly almost always the last bird in the group, it seems to follow the group it is with rather than lead or be in the pack)

-- Edited by Rob Smallwood on Monday 4th of May 2009 10:06:18 AM

__________________
Rob


Status: Offline
Posts: 1149
Date:

Caught up with this bird this afterrnoon/evening at the second attempt - awesome views of a cracking bird, and distinguishable at long range whilst loosely associating witha bout 10 - 15 Common Swift.

A UK first for me, and I'd always imagined my first would be a dodgy fly past at some east coast site!

__________________
Rob


Status: Offline
Posts: 15337
Date:

You're right of course Andy, it is a matter of taste. That said I find the subtle (sometimes not so subtle!) plumage and structural features that can seperate it from Common Swift to be very satisfying indeed and a pleasure but then again I'm strange that way! And I've never seen one in the UK but finding one would be extremely memorable

__________________

Forum administrator and owner



Status: Offline
Posts: 1477
Date:

It's all down to the individual point of view obviously, but when I saw a pallid at Spurn a few years ago (not twitched as I was on an RSPB trip) I wrote in my notes that it was
'Britain's most unwanted' and a bird 'indentified mostly by the calendar' (it was 30th October). There was nothing to distinguish it from 'common' swift, no amusing behaviour, no spectacular colours, no remarkable calls. If it had not been seen from above (a small cliff) by a few people at the same time, it could well have been unacceptable to the rarities panel.

I suppose there is also a subtle difference between a memorable sighting and a memorable bird. Pallid swift is certainly not in the latter class you must admit. Alpine swift: now that's another thing altogether.

__________________

Ever wondered what the Earth was like before life evolved? Stick around.



Status: Offline
Posts: 1229
Date:

Got a phone call off Ian Woosey
Pallid Swift at Crosby Marina fancy going
when we got there it was about 1/2 mile off so quick scoot round to the other side

Where we had cracking views of it flying just above our heads at times also flying with Common Swifts for comparison so could pick out all the subtle differences to the Common Swift
Lifer for me biggrin.gif and also for Ianbiggrin.gif

One of those memorable sighting for me which will live long in in the old memory banks

Cheers Jimmy



__________________
«First  <  1 2 | Page of 2  sorted by
Quick Reply

Please log in to post quick replies.

RODIS

 

This forum is dedicated to the memory of Eva Janice McKerchar.