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Post Info TOPIC: Blacktoft Sands RSPB


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RE: Blacktoft Sands -Goole


Thanks Ian. The carpark gates were locked but I used the nearby lay-by and public footpath to get to the reserve. The Marsh Warbler was belting his song out in full view near the Singleton hide all the time I was there. Also heard but not seen were a couple of Grasshopper Warblers and Water Rails, loads of Sedge Warblers and Whitethroats, a booming Bittern and a distant Tawny Owl. No sign of the Savi's Warbler but it was worth it for the Marsh Warbler alone Also, the Hornets nest is still visible above the Gents if anyone's interested.
Cheers, Mark

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I fancy trying for the singing Marsh Warbler here tomorrow but I'd have to go at dawn's crack and their website says it doesnt open till 9. Does anyone know if this just means the hides and reception like some similar reserves, or the whole place?
Thanks, Mark

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I've certainly been (very) pre 9am with no problems and even chatted to the warden in the hides (which are not locked) who was doing his early morning rounds. Not sure whether that still an accepted norm though but a 9am start isn't much use to most birders.

Savis Warbler present this evening also apparently, perhaps best heard (seen?) in the evening (reserve closes at 9pm).

-- Edited by Ian McKerchar on Tuesday 29th of May 2012 05:53:44 PM

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31/07/11 AM to PM

MARSH SANDPIPER still there right in front of the hide (as you approach the visitors centre its the furthest on the right - if you havent seen it - but most people seem to have been already). The hide was absolutely heaving and there was a pretty big queue for a seat.

7 Marsh Harriers (m,m,f,f,f,f,f)
1 indestructible Avocet chased one of them out of the lake, pecking it in the air. Great stuff.
40+ Teals
30ish Spotted Redshanks
8 Dunlin
3 more Avocets plus 2 very young avocets
8-10 Green Sandpipers
6 Greenshanks
2 Redshanks
30+ Black Tailed Godwits
3 BEARDED TITS (Xerox Hide in the reeds on the shore line opposite)
1 Little Grebe
4 Linnets
2 Reed Buntings
20+ Little Egrets
1 Peregrine
1 Kestrel
3 Sedge Warblers (heard)
1 Reed Warbler (heard)

happy birding,

Rob



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John Barber wrote:

Looking to load the odds in my favour I enlisted the assistance of Blacktoft expert Sid Ashton. Sid had already seen this bird two weeks earlier and has visited the reserve on several occasions


Expert !!!!- John you are having a laugh - still a nice day and pleased that you found the bird and I found my specs

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Despite my best efforts to try and ignore the Marsh Sandpiper at Blacktoft Sands, reading reports from fellow Manc Birders finally tempted me to fill up the petrol tank on my over worked Hyundai and head east across the Pennines.

Apart from a young female driver in a mini trying to commit suicide by over taking us on the slip road to the M56 - she almost turned her car over and ended up facing oncoming traffic - us ! the journey was speedy and uneventful.

Looking to load the odds in my favour I enlisted the assistance of Blacktoft expert Sid Ashton. Sid had already seen this bird two weeks earlier and has visited the reserve on several occasions.

Arriving before the crowds at 8am we had the place entirely to ourselves. The first question, with no one around to ask, was which way to go ?

It's seems inexplicable that when you bring along an expert for guidance, one chooses to ignore that advice - and yet that's exactly what I did. "The birds probably up at the left hand end of the reserve said Sid" No, according to a report on the reception bulletin it was last seen yesterday at the Singleton Hide, lets go that way I said. That mistake was going to cost us most of the morning.

Of course, the Marsh Sandpiper was no where to be seen from the Singleton Hide, despite there being plenty of waders around, including several Greenshanks, which, try as hard as I might, Sid wouldn't allow me to turn into a MS - it's a pain sometimes when you have an expert with you ! One consolation at this stage was the sighting of a young family of six Bearded Tits flitting around the edge of the reeds, marvellous stuff.

Reluctantly we eventually decided to move back up the reserve checking every hide as we went along, seeing plenty of birds along the way, including more Bearded Tits, several Marsh Harriers, more Greenshank, Black Tailed Godwit and Green Sandpiper amongst many others.

Arriving at the Marshland Hide to find a few birders inside we were dismayed to learn that the bird had been feeding there early on but had moved on, probably to the scrape at the Ousefleet Hide. Off we went.

No luck there either, things were beginning to feel like Henry Cooks experience earlier in the week. So we split up, one covering one end of the reserve and one the other. Three and a half hours, and several mobile phone calls later, I eventually got on the bird - just the briefest glimpse - back at the Singleton Hide: huge relief nonetheless. Sid soon joined me and a very full and excited hide were eventually treated to extensive views of the bird as it fed in the margins in front of the hide.

Having found the target bird we were able to relax and take full stock of the birds around. More Marsh Harriers - at least seven seen we think and Sid counted fourteen Bearded Tits in total.

And that was the end of our day, time to head home - but not before Sid rescued his glasses from the roof of the car having driven several hundred yards down the road ! Just a day in the life of a North West birder I guess.



-- Edited by John Barber on Friday 29th of July 2011 09:38:18 PM

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The Marsh Sandpiper showed well from the Ousefleet Screen for three early rising county birders yesterday Henry, so early were they, they had the place to themselves for nearly an hour, other than the warden of course

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26/07/2011 - Marsh Sandpiper still present in the afternoon but a bit of a nightmare to track down. Took 4 hours of scuttling the kilometer or more between hides, regularly being told "you should have been here a minute ago" after the bird had been chased on a couple of occasions by Avocets. After the initial relief of finally seeing it at the Marshland scrape it was great to get close views of this rare and rather delicate wading bird amongs the wader-fest at present. Also about were:

3 Little Egrets
28 Greylag Geese
1 Pochard - plus 3 young still
3 Marsh Harriers
1 Kestrel
2 Curlew Sandpipers
9 Dunlins
14 Ruffs
15 Spotted Redshanks
2 Greenshanks
8 Common Snipes
40+ Black-tailed Godwits
4 Green Sandpipers
3 Avocets - plus young
3 Yellow Wagtails - plus 8 or more youngsters
4 Reed Warblers
2 Sedge Warblers
1 Bearded Tit

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Afternoon visit after dipping White-rumped Sandpiper on Teesside.

Good views of the Marsh Sandpiper on Ousefleet, Marshlands & Townend.

Also around today:

Black-tailed Godwit min 150
Yellow Wagtail 5 Juveniles
Ruff min 4
Spotted Redshank min 15
Little Egret 4
Little Grebe 3 Juveniles
Green Sandpiper 6-10
Curlew Sandpiper 1

plus all the usuals.

Also, the Hornets 'showing well' and a reasonable collection of Butterflies, plenty of Red-tailed Bumblebees, Common Carder Bee and 2 species of Dragonfly.

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first time here with phil kelly,good day. 53 species seen.
at least 8 marsh harriers at one time,mostly juveniles. been reported there is 16 juveniles fledged this year.
marsh sandpiper did one on thursday, no spoonbills either
12+spotted redshanks
3 greenshanks
6 green sandpipers
6 ruff (all looking different from each other, plumage wise)
5 little egrets
4 avocets + 3 chicks
1 garganey
1 bearded tit (m) good views whilst feeding on the mud on marshland pool.
1 yellow wagtail (juvenille)
8 dunlins
50+ black tailed godwits
1 snipe
redshanks
1 pochard (f) + 3 chicks
1 linnet
2 buzzard
3 kestrels
2 grey herons
1 little grebe + 2 chicks
reed warblers, sedge warblers, blackcaps, willow warblers, whitethroats,
mallards, coots, moorhens, shovelers, lapwings, teals, b-h-gulls, l-b-b-gulls
canada goose, greylag goose, pheasants, magpies, crows, starlings, feral pigeons
wood pigeons, collared doves, tree sparrows, dunnocks, wrens, blackbirds
reed buntings, goldfinches, chaffinches, blue/great & long tailed tits
swifts, swallows, sand martins & house martins.

thanks again phil for a great day out





-- Edited by steven burke on Saturday 23rd of July 2011 08:46:59 PM

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Had a similar list as Gary after going for the Marsh Sandpiper yesterday morning. Great day After parking your car though, be careful if you need to 'park your breakfast' - I found a HORNETS nest in the roof of the toilet block. Kept having to explain why I was looking at the Gents through my bins

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16th/17th july 2011
Spent two days on the reserve with Mrs G and were treated to some memorable birding highlights , Marsh sandpiper being the main event which looked very much like a greenshank to me but with obvious more slimmer bill. Female Garganey still showing well along with 2 wood sandpipers,2 green sandpipers and 2 common sandpipers. Other birds included ,2 dunlin,2 ruff,2 spoonbill,4 avocet ,several redshank,7 marsh harriers 7 spotted redshanks 7 going in my lottery numbers,kestrel , hobby,barn owl,bearded tit, grasshopper ,sedge,reed warblers. A great weekends birding and still one of the best reserves ive visited and met some very friendly birders.juv Marsh harriers landing no more than ten yards infront of singleton hide and basking in the evening sun and eating I think baby toads hundreds of them about.Great for photos

-- Edited by Gary Gorner on Monday 18th of July 2011 08:58:47 PM

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RE: Blacktoft Sands - Goole


Managed to persuade Mrs A that she needed a bit of fresh Yorkshire air this afternoon so we went over to Blacktoft

A good number of wader species present :- Little Egret, Ruff, Redshank, Greenshank, Dunlin, Snipe, Common Sandpiper, Spotted Redshank, Lapwing, Black-tailed Godwit, Whimbrel, Green Sandpiper, Avocet and of course the one we went to see Marsh Sandpiper which gave really good views from the screen at Ousefleet hide.

There was a female Garganey in front of First hide, also present there was a Little Grebe with chicks.

We also had excellent views of Marsh Harriers from the Singleton hide culminating in a spectacular 7 birds in the air at the same time just as we were leaving. I think Mrs A enjoyed that sight

Also nice to meet Richard Norris again.

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RE: Blacktoft Sands -Goole


We visited yesterday and were rewarded with some fantastic views of the Spoonbill having a bath and preening. Also present were

Spotted redshank
Sedge warbler
Reed warbler
Reed bunting
Redshank
Greenshank
Shovler
Shelduck
Mallard
Coot
Marsh harrier
Avocet
Tree sparrow
Black tailed godwit
Whitethroat

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visited blacktoft on sunday species list pretty much the same as marks with the exception of

no green shank or yellowhammer
but we did see 2 bearded tits and about 6 reed bunting

also saw a hobby over the M62 by the ebuyer warehouse

-- Edited by jason fisher on Tuesday 14th of June 2011 06:53:30 PM

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Annual trip to Yorkshire for the Nightjar at Hatfield Moors. Also called in at North Cave Wetlands. Amongst other stuff at Blacktoft :-

Spoonbill (2)
Marsh Harrier (c.8)
Avocet (75+)
LRP (1)
Snipe (2)
Black tailed Godwit (c.15)
Spotted Redshank (1)
Greenshank (1)
Sedge Warbler
Reed Warbler
Whitethroat
Blackcap
Tree Sparrow (c.12)
Yellowhammer (c.8)

There was a sign up stating the pools by the most northerly hide had completely dried up due to the dry weather and words to the effect that there was nothing to see. We didn't walk up there but it's where the Barn Owl nest box is and where you get a usual tick. It's a different world, weather wise, east of the Pennines!

-- Edited by Mark Jarrett on Sunday 12th of June 2011 10:43:20 AM

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biggrin.gif22/4/11

Cracking days birding on arrival we saw a full summer plumaged slavonian grebe right in front of the hide and a grasshopper warler which Mary thought was tame ,it was showing brill within 10ft of us and kept everyone mesmorised with its quivering body tremmbling call. Mid afternoon we were treated to a bittern fly by which we had been listening boom in the morning. The marsh harriers were also making the most of the hot thermals at least 9 on one qick scan of the scope mostly males and the females were very territorial. Another great visit to this one of my favourite reserves and up to 100 avocets biggrin.gif whitethrotes, reed bunting, tree sparrows, skylarks ,warblers all seem to be doing very well here.biggrin.gifcant wait to go again.

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sunday visit

just one thing of note other than the usual suspects, 2 long earded owls sat in the tree 10ft from the xerox hide, thankfully roped off to avoid disturbance to the birds but what a interesting position to roost, so close to everyone walking by all the time smile.gif

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4 marsh harriers today

Merlin and sparrowhawk sat in same tree from the singleton hide, all frozen over and not much else showing cry.gif

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Good wader action at Blacktoft today. Well worth a visit. Decent stuff included:

Curlew sandpiper (ridiculous amounts)
Little stint (2)
Wood Sandpiper (1)
Dunlin
Spotted Redshank (4)
Redshank
Black tailed godwit
Greenshank
Little Ringed Plover
Ringed plover
Snipe
Yellow wagtail
Marsh Harrier
Sparrowhawk
Kestrel

Loads of those mini toad things aswell. Fascinating.

The Spoonbills werent about sadly. The sheer number of Curlew sand was quite impressive. Its not often they re the most common wader when you re in a hide and all the views were really close up. Good stuff!

Thanks Mark

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First visit last night to this wonderful reserve at the end of a day of Yorkshire Birding - birds seen included:

Marsh Harrier 4
Spoonbill 2
Curlew Sandpiper 7+
Little Stint 1
Spotted Redshank 1
Water Rail
Yellow Wags 2

Plus:
Redshank
Greenshank
Snipe
Ringed Plover
Dunlin
Little Egret
Shoveler
Teal
Heron

Will definitely visit again soon.



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late 3pm mooch


fifty snipe all in the long grass, usual ducks, teal, shovelar, single goldeneye, lots of dunlin, lapwing, from the singleton hide was merlin, barn owl and at one point 8 marsh harriers




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A good day out, even though the harriers were not very active.

Not spoiled by 1 idiot who sat for a while in Singleton, who spent 10 minutes going on about scopes and binoculars to someone else, loudly. Then another 10 on how it's better to joint the local RSPB group as local area groups can be funny with new members. Paul managed to miss him as was still at marshside photographing the wood sandpiper, the lucky git.

One really nice thing was the 9 year old with his parents, non birders, who was spending his birthday at Blacktoft and was thrilled to see the bearded tits, with help from my scope, and very excited to see 2 harriers in the air at once.

Anyway,
marsh harrier at least 5 female/youngsters and 1 male.
bearded tits too numerous to count, all youngsters and seemed to be showing well at all the hides.
greenshank, at least 3
spotted redshank, at least 5
several green sandpiper
common sandpiper, 1
wood sandpiper, 1
ruff, at least 20
reed warblers, 3
sedge warbler, 1
stock dove, 3
dunlin, over 30
black-tailed godwit over 30
yellow wagtails at least 5
merlin, 1

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11 july 2009

What a brilliant place to visit lots of different habitat for the birds and therefore lots of different birds .It was one of those days when you just didnt know which way to turn.Barn owl hunting over the reeds ,marsh harriers up in the air and perched in trees,bearded tits picking about in the mud,spotted redshanks doing battle with greenshanks,common redshank and blacktailed godwits for prime feeding positions.Green sandpiper having a go at the ruff and lots of warblers about sedge,reed,blackcap and whitethrote.I realy didnt want to leave this place but Bempton was calling and one of Vernons CAKESbiggrin.gif back at the car.
6 marsh harrier
6 bearded tits
2 greenshank
6 spotted redshank
1 greensandpiper
8 ruff
1 barn owl
1 kestrel
plus lots of the more common birds


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8 April 2009

A rare trip away from Elton to one of our favourite haunts gave us a relaxing afternoon watching Marsh Harriers. Ten were seen (5 males and 5 females). Two of the males were VERY pale - one almost looking like a male Hen Harrier. Fantastic views including food swaps.

Other birds seen included:
Yellow Wagtail 1
Sanderling 1
Redshank 3
Spotted Redshank 2
Avocet c70
LR Plover 2
Ruff 1
Black-tailed Godwit c50
Bearded Tit 2
Tree Sparrow c10

All-in-all a good day - and the weather was good (unlike on this side of the country!)

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Well done to all who saw this bird and no surprise in not identifying it as an Amur. The Amur has only recently been recognised in its own right anyway, as it was formerly the Eastern Red-footed Falcon. I remember seeing the Black-eared Kite last year in Norfolk, which was very far from its wintering grounds of South East Asia and Indonesia. At least this Amur Falcon was going in almost the right direction, seeking its wintering grounds in southern Africa, who knows what might turn up next!? smile.gif

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Quite simply Mike it's re-identification was relatively straight forward once it's 2nd generation pure white underwing coverts had begun moulting through, which I believe only began to happen a week or two ago.

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Does anyone else find it odd that all the discussion is about whether people could/should tick/list/whatever this particular bird, rather than the how and why of its' re-identification, together with the implications, if any, for sightings of non-adult red-foots in the future?

As an advocate of find-it-yourself birding I'd have thought that would have been of interest to you, Ian? Maybe we need another i.d. guide for the articles section. Field sketches only, of course, no photos

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Simon Warford wrote:

Ian McKerchar wrote:

But i just wonder how much satisfaction comes from a tick with those circumstances?




as for satisfaction? That came im massive amounts from yesterdays morning at Elton, a morning which i will remember for a long time and was much better than any Armchair tick.smile.gif

-- Edited by Simon Warford at 13:22, 2008-10-19






Quite right too pal, a stunning morning all round indeed and the most impressive display of visible migration I've witnessed in the county myself.

As for identifying birds from photographs, as is an increasingly common occurrence for rarities these days, I'm afraid I fail to be as easy going about it as you about it

Armchair ticks are armchair ticks...ticks all the same and for those that care, go get 'em

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Ian McKerchar wrote:

But i just wonder how much satisfaction comes from a tick with those circumstances?




Not much satisfaction in the slightest Ian, but ive seen the bird and if its accepted as an Amur all well and good and im glad i went to Tophill Low when i did, i enjoyed watching the bird as a Red Foot at the time.. as for satisfaction? That came im massive amounts from yesterdays morning at Elton, a morning which i will remember for a long time and was much better than any Armchair tick.smile.gif

-- Edited by Simon Warford at 13:22, 2008-10-19

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Paul, I think it was more the contrasting underwing pattern in general I commented on and not the actual underwing coverts, which at the time we saw it, had definately not grown any white on themwink.gif

I as many other birders have had no previous experience with Amur Falcon, in fact it is only in two of my field guides.

Yes we had excellent views of the bird perched up and in flight and at the time I couldnt
have identified the bird as an Amur Falcon.

At the end of the day it would seem the bird stayed around long enough to be identified from photo's once it had started to develop its white underwing coverts. So what if it was identified from photo's thats the way birding is these days alot of the time, look at the Murelet in Devon and other recent rarities.

Whether i saw the bird after or before it was identified makes no real difference, my concience is clear but i will wait till its accepted officially firstsmile.gif

Would i have been elevated back to legandary status if I had identified it as an Amur?biggrin.gif


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i do remember simon remarking on the light underwing coverts...

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of course not having seen it myself and the only photo on the galleries involving such a pose that it would, for all intents and purposes, not be seperable from a red-foot, i go with what the photographers tell me...phew!

Fact is that the misidentification is no disgrace at all, not until it gained those 2nd generation underwing coverts anyway and all county birders i know saw it prior to this i think. But i just wonder how much satisfaction comes from a tick with those circumstances?

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Don't know about Simon's, but "slap" OML!

If I send a photo taken when it was thought to be a Red-foot how would you caption it on the Website?! biggrin.gif

-- Edited by Rob Smallwood at 22:55, 2008-10-18

-- Edited by Rob Smallwood at 23:16, 2008-10-18

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Simon Warford wrote:

Sat 27th - Then on to Tophill Low for another raptor. This time a sparkling 1st summer male Red Footed Falcon performed on and off for us all afternoon and gave wonderful views hunting dragonflies sometimes just above our heads.






Oh dear Now reidentified as an Amur Falcon, are you going to count it How's your concience

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Simon Warford wrote:

Sat 27th - visited Blacktoft with Paul Cliff and Melanie Beckford. Possible distant Honey Buzzard flying west late am plus definate Hobby, Merlin, Marsh Harrier, male Sparrowhawk with prey and several Kestrel. A nice group of 9 Bearded Tits gave excellent views both on the mud and perched on the tops of reeds from Marshland Hide, also water rail but few waders just Spotted Redshanks and Ruff of any note.

Then on to Tophill Low for another raptor. This time a sparkling 1st summer male Red Footed Falcon performed on and off for us all afternoon and gave wonderful views hunting dragonflies sometimes just above our heads. With several Buzzards here and more sparrowhawks it turned out to be a decent raptor daysmile.gif

On the water several Pintail amongst the hundreds of tufteds and the adult winter Black Necked Grebe remained, all in all an enjoyable outing.smile.gif

t'was a great day out,a proper Raptor-fest,the Bearded Tits were a lifer for me but the display the Red Footed Falcon put on had us all stunned,never dreamed or hoped to see such a show......brilliant!! and the company was good too biggrin.gif






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Sat 27th - visited Blacktoft with Paul Cliff and Melanie Beckford. Possible distant Honey Buzzard flying west late am plus definate Hobby, Merlin, Marsh Harrier, male Sparrowhawk with prey and several Kestrel. A nice group of 9 Bearded Tits gave excellent views both on the mud and perched on the tops of reeds from Marshland Hide, also water rail but few waders just Spotted Redshanks and Ruff of any note.

Then on to Tophill Low for another raptor. This time a sparkling 1st summer male Red Footed Falcon performed on and off for us all afternoon and gave wonderful views hunting dragonflies sometimes just above our heads. With several Buzzards here and more sparrowhawks it turned out to be a decent raptor daysmile.gif

On the water several Pintail amongst the hundreds of tufteds and the adult winter Black Necked Grebe remained, all in all an enjoyable outing.smile.gif



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Hi Simon

I try to get over there a couple of times each year - unfortunately missed this year so far. Looks like you had a superb day.

Definitely one of my favourite places for birding.

Rgds

Mike

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Oh and i forgot 197 Blackwit!

Was a good day out, a couple of the hides had plenty of mud and the waders were all close so had really good views. Was good fun picking the Little Stints and Curlew Sands out from the Dunlin. Defo worth a call in on the way back from Spurn if nowts doing! ya never know we might get a red-necked stint or a marbled godwit!!

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sue and I are going on Wednesday - be nice to see a few more waders.

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Nice list Si, almost as good as Rumworth! biggrin.gif Maybe we should call in if spurn is poor in two weeks, good selection of waders at Tophil Low too.

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Blacktoft Sands RSPB


Waders galoure of all ages and plumage.

Curlew Sand 7
Little Stint 3
Green Sand 8+
Dunlin 100+
Ruff 32
Greenshank 9
Golden Plover 151+
Spot Redshank 13
Ringed Plover 10
Curlew 2
Snipe 15
Lapwing & Redshank uncounted. Also Wigeon, Gadwall, Teal, 20+ Yellow Wag, 4 Marsh Harrier inc pair food passing, Barn Owl, Bearded Tits, Tree Sparrow, Whitethroat, Reed Warbler etc etc

-- Edited by Ian McKerchar on Monday 17th of September 2012 03:18:50 PM

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