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Post Info TOPIC: Goyt Valley


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RE: Goyt Valley


Early morning today 07:30 - 09:50, cold and windy - when will it warm up. There was little birdsong in the cold weather, what song there was resulted in a difficult job to locate the bird.

Common sandpiper
cormorant and canada geese on the water,
single male redstart
tree pipit
many willow warblers
3 kestrel
red grouse
dipper
cuckoo, near old quarry
all the usual woodland species.


Phil

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An evening stroll 5-45 to 7-30pm starting at the layby just out of Whaley Bridge, up to Fernilee dam then back through Hillbridge nature reserve and Taxal, to car.

2 Nesting Woodpigeon
4 Male Pheasant
1 Heron
12 Willow Warbler
5 Chiffchaff
2 Jay
and the highlights:

1 Male Redstart, just below Fernilee dam, first of the year for me.

Then 4 Crossbill in Parkwood, (adjacent to Hillbridge).
Only downside, No Pied Flycatchers yet!

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5 willow warblers, 2 kestrel, 1 buzzard and a sparrowhawk. No sign of common sands yet.

Phil

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30 crossbills in 'The Street' car park in Goyt Valley this morning. Very active in amongst all the trees round about there. Also plenty of tits and siskin.

Phil

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on new years eve there were 10 teal in the flooded fields described on previous post.
there were also 80+ mallard and 200+ canada geese.

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On Christmas eve and Christmas day there was a male Wigeon amongst the large flock of Canada geese that Louise has reported. However by the 27th it seemed to have left. The flooded field next to watersisde road has also seen teal and common sandpiper in the last year or so.
It always worth a look for smaller birds too in the flooded field, there were both grey and pied wagtails present on Christmas day.
The new reedbed and marsh habitat is coming on well especially with the recent heavy rain. The new habitat has attracted snipe although there is alot of disturbance from dog walkers etc near the main reedbed as the footpath and new boardwalk goes straight through the marshy area where the snipe were last seen!

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My friend and I had a stroll along the Goyt Valley near New Mills, I fidnt see much there was a large flock of Canada Geese with one White Goose in the miidle of them and a Grey Heron in field, but apart from a few Mallard and a Moorhen that was about it.
However it does look like they are trying to create a nice habitat there, The are some fenced off reed beds which are fenced to allow flora and fauna to develop and a few reed lined pools.


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Near Derbyshire Bridge 16th Oct 11.00 am 11-30am

Crossbill 17 west, 12 west, 7 west, 2 west,
Swallow 4 south

-- Edited by Phil Barnett on Sunday 16th of October 2011 06:45:21 AM

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Hello Steven

I understand the gamekeeper cited fox predation for the nest failure, although a reliable witness said the evidence suggested the eggs may have been stamped on.

I was particularly upset to learn that a pristine wing of the male was on the floor near the nest. This does not really suggest fox predation, as it appeared as if it had been snapped off without any feathers being ruffled.

The bird may be dead, but the memory of watching this bird in May, whilst it hunted over the heather in the pinky evening sunlight is still very much alive for me.
The RSPB do not appear to have supported any serious nes****ch scheme, and the demise of the nest was i suppose to be expected.

Also, the secrecy surrounding the nest (which in my own experience was facilitated by an RSPB group and the local ranger) obviated sufficient numbers of volunteers for a 24 hour nest watch.

The "nes****ch members" refused to impart any info (when i stumbled into them whilst watching S.E.Owls) and to my dismay they came across as being quite smug!

The last time Hen Harriers nested successfully in the goyt valley (97) was largely due to the 24/7 nest watch by local birders who were not subjected to a shroud of secrecy.

Andy


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A walk arround Fernilee was capped off with an enormous flock of mixed birds.
These included,
Siskins
Chaffinch,
Willow Warblers,
Blue Tits,
Longtailed Tits,
Chiff Chaffs.
The majority were siskins with some superbly coloured males.
We stood watching them emerge from a large silver birch into the Oak and hawthorn in groups of about 10-15 for a good ten minutes. There must have been well over 150 birds.
They seemed to be feeding on flying insects, particularly the Willow Warblers which performed more like flycatchers, doing vertical take offs then alighting back where they came from.

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Saturday 12 - 4pm up the river, along the West side of Fernilee reservoir and back again

Highlights:

Fair few crossbill flying about, but unfortunately no good views on offer
Goldcrest
2 pairs of chiffchaff including a pair feeding young
redpoll
siskin
2 common sandpiper
dipper
2 grey wagtail
treecreeper
nuthatch
possible pied flycatcher female carrying food next to the reservoir. Briefest of views but noted white wingbar and brown plumage. However it was in bad light, and in the view I had I couldn't confidently say it wasn't a female chaffinch.
pied wagtail
curlew heard


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A good 4 hours around Errwood reservoir 8.30-12.30
Highlights included:
8 Crossbills (above Shooters Clough bridge)
3 Lesser Redpolls
4 Common Redstart (1 subadult male-just up path from Errwood Hall)
Pied Flycatcher juv (3 on 'riverside path')
Wood Warbler 3, best view I have ever had of one (on the same path).
Stonechat feeding up to 4 young (Eastern side)
Grasshopper Warbler and Garden Warbler (again Eastern path)
Goldcrest and young (path to Hall)
2 Common Sandpiper
4 Curlew
Many Blackcaps, Willow Warblers, Chiffchaffs
4 Nuthatch, one with juvenilles.
2 Treecreepers
Stock Dove
Kestrel
2 GS Woodpeckers
Skylark
7 Swallows
8 Meadow Pipits
Grey Wagtail on river, Pied Wagtail by dam
4 Mistle Thrushes
Young Jay
Many Great, Blue and especially Coal Tits
Greenfinch, Goldfinches and many Chaffinches.
2 Pheasants
25 Canada Geese and young

Couldn't see any lizards on the dam, any pointers to where exactly to look?

All in all, though, a great mornings birding.

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A very pleasant walk around Fernilee resr this evening, but pretty quiet on the bird front:

1 Common Sandpiper
3 Grey Wagtail (1 juv)
Pair Canada Geese with 4 juv
Pair Tufted Duck
Mandarins
Willow Warbler
Lots of swallows and House Martins about.

Cheers,

Steve.

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when I added the url for the nest watch report it replaced the last letter of nest and the first 3 letters of watch with *'s (profanity filter blocks certain words deemed inappropiate, oddly the same words I use where gamekeepers are concerned)

-- Edited by Mike Price on Sunday 12th of June 2011 09:17:38 PM

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Hi Jonathan and Mike, didn't realise the shooters were looking for a challenge when shooting, or indeed whether a released bird would behave any differently. I agree, it is necessary to control grouse numbers, and shooters do that extremely well as well as providing jobs. I had heard that the shooters killed loads of grouse in a day, I agree that they could probably shoot a few less. Many thanks for clearing that up,
Joe

By the way, what's a fixed url profanity filter and what's it doing finding 'naughty words'?

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Hi Joe,

I am fairly sure that trap and transfer was another solution they looked into, whilst I can't remember the exact reasons without checking I am fairly sure the shooting industry were against it for various reasons including the difference in the way they behaved during the shoot.

Whilst I am not anti shooting I do think its time that we looked into what the actual benefits to society (locally and nationally) are. (we know that heather moorland needs a certain amount of management to maintain the habitat but that is largely for the benefit of the grouse.

The financial cost in the way of EU grants and tax deductable away days don't seem to be taken into account when working out what the financial benefits of shooting are to a community, and when measured against the tourism benefits of wildlife to the UK I expect they are but a drop in the ocean anyway.

If the shooting industry were able to self regulate and we did not keep seeing instances of persecution of protected wildlife then I feel these considerations might not be so important but given the current state of play it would appear that in some areas no raptors are safe this document from the peak nest watch project for 2010 is further proof that the usual spin of a few rogue keepers bringing the industry into disrepute is far from the truth.


-- Edited by Mike Price on Sunday 12th of June 2011 08:01:29 PM fixed url profanity filter made a naughty word from nest watch


-- Edited by Mike Price on Sunday 12th of June 2011 08:11:18 PM

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Unfortunately it's far more complex than that Joe. A great many conservationists wouldn't want to see the end of grouse shooting as the moors provided a superb habitat for many creatures - I believe around 90% of all England's upland nesting waders nest on grouse moors, for instance. And shooters wouldn't want to shoot birds that were recently released as they would be classed as too easy a target.

A simple solution to the problem of grouse v's harriers would be for the shooters to accept smaller bags - getting their enjoyment from the whole experience of being out on a grouse moor, rather than the number of birds killed. The former does apply to many shooters, but all too often good days are judged solely on the amount of grouse shot and days are advertised as '200 bird days', etc. Sadly, it all probably comes down to a matter of pounds, shillings and pence - I think the actual price of shooting a driven red grouse on the top estates these days is over £100 per bird.

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Mike Price wrote:

Joe Wynn wrote:

Why can't they raise young grouse in pens like they do with phesants, would that mean that any share taken by the harrier is compensated by an artificially high number to start with? Just a thought.






The Hen Harrier Dialogue Group spent a lot of time (and money I expect) trying to find a workable solution with regard the conflict between grouse shooting and hen harrier.

Rear and release was one of the things looked into, you can read about it here

All the documents relating to the project are available here

The problems relating to rear and release seem to be that grouse don't do nearly as well as pheasants when reared and released (50% of bird released in one study died of starvation within 3 weeks of release, although there were doubts about how suitable the release area was in the first place).




Cheers mike, from what they're saying though, the papers there sound like reintoduction schemes (or at the very least a long-term solutions), why not rear them on a year to year basis, and simply release them as fodder for the shoot a few weeks (or even days) before the shooters get there? That way, it wouldn't matter if the captive grouse wouldn't survive more than a few weeks, as they wouldn't need to. That leaves the harriers the naturally occuring grouse to snack on.

Just to make it clear, I don't think shootings a good idea. Its fundamentally flawed as it requires the persecution of natural predators to be worthwhile, and the grouse population would be best regulated with harriers (in my opinion).

-- Edited by Joe Wynn on Sunday 12th of June 2011 07:29:06 PM

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Joe Wynn wrote:

Why can't they raise young grouse in pens like they do with phesants, would that mean that any share taken by the harrier is compensated by an artificially high number to start with? Just a thought.






The Hen Harrier Dialogue Group spent a lot of time (and money I expect) trying to find a workable solution with regard the conflict between grouse shooting and hen harrier.

Rear and release was one of the things looked into, you can read about it here

All the documents relating to the project are available here

The problems relating to rear and release seem to be that grouse don't do nearly as well as pheasants when reared and released (50% of bird released in one study died of starvation within 3 weeks of release, although there were doubts about how suitable the release area was in the first place).

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Why can't they raise young grouse in pens like they do with phesants, would that mean that any share taken by the harrier is compensated by an artificially high number to start with? Just a thought.

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Jonathan Platt wrote:

Jimmy Meadows wrote:

What makes it worse is that not long back on BBC North West they interviewed a game keeper who said that Red Grouse need to be culled as they do damage to the moors TOTAL DISBELIEF on that i can tell you.So why then breed something which is a pest so called to them for release so the RICH can shoot them if anyone can answer that good luck.





I'm not really making any comment on the incident concerning the harrier nest, it's probably better to allow the police (and hopefully the RSPB) to examine the case before jumping to conclusions - let's leave that to raptorpolitics.org. who seem to have figured out whodunnit already. Didn't they do something similar a couple of years ago concerning another hen harrier nest, then ended up with egg on their face - if you'll excuse the pun - when the RSPB claimed the nest was destroyed by four, rather than two-legged predators?

If a gamekeeper suggested 'red grouse need to be culled as they damage moorland' then he's clearly been sniffing his own stash of Alphachloralose! Contrary to popular belief, red grouse aren't artificially reared, nor are they fed during the winter (apart from grit). Populations are cyclic, with disease (primarily louping ill) causing massive crashes in populations. It would be very difficult to maintain a population of red grouse so high that it caused moorland any kind of damage. The only way estate owners can maintain or improve the numbers of grouse is through habitat improvement (mainly rotational heather burning) and predator control . . . and therein lies the rub!




The bad weather at the wrong time can also have a drastic effect on grouse numbers (it must be impossible for the female to cover a large brood) I have heard it said that this years weather is likely to be causing problems.

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Jimmy Meadows wrote:

What makes it worse is that not long back on BBC North West they interviewed a game keeper who said that Red Grouse need to be culled as they do damage to the moors TOTAL DISBELIEF on that i can tell you.So why then breed something which is a pest so called to them for release so the RICH can shoot them if anyone can answer that good luck.





I'm not really making any comment on the incident concerning the harrier nest, it's probably better to allow the police (and hopefully the RSPB) to examine the case before jumping to conclusions - let's leave that to raptorpolitics.org. who seem to have figured out whodunnit already. Didn't they do something similar a couple of years ago concerning another hen harrier nest, then ended up with egg on their face - if you'll excuse the pun - when the RSPB claimed the nest was destroyed by four, rather than two-legged predators?

If a gamekeeper suggested 'red grouse need to be culled as they damage moorland' then he's clearly been sniffing his own stash of Alphachloralose! Contrary to popular belief, red grouse aren't artificially reared, nor are they fed during the winter (apart from grit). Populations are cyclic, with disease (primarily louping ill) causing massive crashes in populations. It would be very difficult to maintain a population of red grouse so high that it caused moorland any kind of damage. The only way estate owners can maintain or improve the numbers of grouse is through habitat improvement (mainly rotational heather burning) and predator control . . . and therein lies the rub!

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Guess its difficult to prove for sure that it wasn't a fox without witnesses but its a sad state of affairs in any case.

-- Edited by Phil Panton on Sunday 12th of June 2011 08:14:05 AM

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Its a terrible shame that not even one pair of harriers can live in the peaks. I hope they catch the culprits. On a lighter note, early morning between shooter's clough and the end of the riverside walk 0715-1030 produced:

1 Cuckoo calling
2 Redstart
1 Spotted Flycatcher
3 Wood Warbler
3 Curlew
1 Treecreeper
2 Tree pipits
1 GS Woodpecker
1 Chiffchaff
A fair few Willow Warbler and Blackcaps

Highlight though had to be the pied flycatchers which were in one of the nest boxes. Watched the parents going in and out for about half an hour, with the gap between feeds only about 3 mins maximum. what made it particularly interesting was that there were 3 adult birds feeding the young, two males and a females. Is this because they are polygamous? Anyway, i'm just glad pied flys don't eat grouse

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this is just devastating news it just makes you so sad,angry & frustrated knowing that such a thing like this happens time after time.

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saburke


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I can unfortunately confirm its true and raptor politics are running this story on it

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Just heard that a Harriers nest with 7 eggs in plus the female as been destroyed in Derbyshire nr to the Goyt valley on Lord Derbys land.

No words i can say would calm me down on this as to the greed of the land owners what is causing this to happen.

I know the powers that be try there hardest to stop this happening but until they can hit the land owners in there pocket and what big pockets these folk have.

What makes it worse is that not long back on BBC North West they interviewed a game keeper who said that Red Grouse need to be culled as they do damage to the moors TOTAL DISBELIEF on that i can tell you.So why then breed something which is a pest so called to them for release so the RICH can shoot them if anyone can answer that good luck.

If the Peak District cannot hold 1pr of Harrier without damaging the economy of the Land Owners what is this country coming to

The powers that be should go for a judgement to stop the shooting for at least one season if its found that someone from the estate as done this but for me that is the only way it might help. Most likely not as all the top dogs are in this together and if they could we would be next just for a bit of sport to the Gentry.
Furious its not even close to how i feel about this i can tell you.

Jimmy







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11.00am-8.00pm ( dodging showers ) 56 species seen.
over the moors from burbage...
lots off red grouse and willow warblers
pair off whinchat
pair off stonechat
linnetts, curlews, lapwings, kestrels, ravens, and peregrine falcon

in the valley around riverside walk and errwood res...
3 wood warblerssmile.gif
5 redstarts (1pair and 3 males)
2 pied flycatchers (males)
2 pairs spotted flycatchers
dippers, tree pipits, common sandpipers
plenty off blackcaps and willow warblers
nuthatches, treecreepers, great spotted woodpeckers
1 sparrowhawk, buzzards,
+ all usual woodland birds.
heard 2 cuckoos



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Round fernilee and errwood yesterday and the Sandpipers were putting on quite a courtship performance on the pond at the side of Fernilee resevoir.
They were raising their wings straight up (somtimes only one wing) and chasing each other round the edge of the pond.
I think a bit of mating took place actually on the water, he almost drowned her, but even after this the courtship continued.
Great to watch

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Steve,
Saw a pair of Golden Plover on the moor between Whitehall and Chapel today, its on my post about Chapel Station.


Went along the top edge from Macc Road at Whaley Bridge towards Pimms Chair on Saturday and spotted this years first Cuckoo, chatting to a farmer he said his mother inlaw had heard it 2 day ago which would have been the 21st April. Also saw a Wheatear and lots of Willow Warblers.

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walked over the moors from macclesfield old road and had.. (49 species seen)
3 wheatear
2 lapwing
several pairs off curlew
1 peregrine falcon
1 raven
lots off red grouse and meadow pipits. no golden plover.
willow warbler all over
into the goyt valley down the riverside walk and had..
1 pair pied flycatcher also 1 male in another area further along
3 redstart and 2 others singing in other areas
2 tree pipits
plus all usual woodland birds except for blackcap and chiff chaffconfuse.gif
lots off lizzards along the walls off errwood res sunning themselvessmile.gif
again willow warbler all over
on the way back over the moors macclesfield old road..
finally found 1 pair off stonechat smile.gifsmile.gif


-- Edited by Ian McKerchar on Monday 25th of April 2011 07:07:33 AM

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saburke


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Curlew
Red Grouse
Meadow Pipits
Blackcaps
Peregrine
Willow Warblers
Reed Warbler


p.s.
Nice to see you guys from Rosthernesmile.gif

-- Edited by Geoff Walton on Friday 15th of April 2011 07:47:13 PM

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"We Three" parked at Errwood and went down by the stream, up and round, and then up to Errwood hall, and on to the top and back down to the car park.

Stream Path
Nest Boxes with Spotted Flycatchers and Nuthatches and Tawney Owl on tree above the nest box.

Errwood/Moor

3 Buzzards
Kestrel
Sparrowhawk
Curlew
Skylarks
Meadow Pipits
Grey Wagtails

Good day, really nice on the tops.


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Yet another fruitless Ouzel trip :(

Did have a nice Golden Plover on the single track road between the A54 and A53 over Axe Edge Moor. Also millions (well about 10) Red Grouse here

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Nice morning around the reservoirs and upon the moors between 7.30 -1pm -first free Saturday for ages. Our first visit to the valley - really excellent birding and wonderful landscapes.
saw the following:

Pied Flycatcher- 1 m in oakwood by Fernilee reservoir

Redstart - pair with 3 fledged youngsters calling loudly close to the road between the 2 reservoirs. 2 more males singing around the reservoir and another flying across the road near Erwood hall

Wood Warbler - great views of a pair at SW end of Fernilee res. Another heard singing but not seen further along same track

Tree Pipit - 1 singing in hedge near Erwood car park

Spotted Flycatcher - 1, Erwood car park

Grey Wagtail - pair with 4 fledged young at N end of Fernilee Res

G S Woodpecker - adult at nest hole with 2 large nestlings hanging out, making lots of noise

Also on the circuit of Fernilee Res, saw/ heard Blackcap (4 singing), Chiffchaff (2), Willow Warblers (lots), Nuthatch (2), Sparrowhawk (1), Buzzard (1), Mistle Thrush (2), Song Thrush (3), lots of Blue, Coal and Great Tits with fledglings, plenty of Goldcrests heard but not seen, Mallard (18, all male), House Martin (6), Swallow(10), Chaffinch (lots), Carrion Crows, Jackdaws, Woodpigeons, and a Wood Mouse running across the path. Surprisingly, no Sandpipers seen.

Further up the valley, from Derbyshire Bridge on old coach road:
Lots of Curlews flying around, and one seen with well-grown chick, 2 ad Golden Plovers, many Meadow Pipits, Skylarks, possible Raven (heard it), m Reed Bunting, pr Stonechats, f Pied Wag carrying food, few Goldfinch and Chaffinch. Didnt see any Red Grouse - met another birder who said they are scarce there this year. Same birder described mouth-watering selection of raptors which he said are more active in the evenings - will have to go back. Also saw a weasel on stone wall, apparently in hot pursuit of something - kept popping up and looking around frantically..

we returned home, after swift pint at Cat & Fiddle, sun-burnt but happy.smile.gif

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Went up to Errwood again last night with Stockport RSPB members group.
Very cold and windy but we managed to see 4 Common Sandpiper, 1 male Pied Flycatcher, SE Owl, Tawny Owl and about 3 Woodcock.
No Tree Pipits or Redstarts though.

-- Edited by Tony Coatsworth at 08:26, 2007-05-01

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We were there about noon and it was very busy with walkers - I'll try one evening next week if the weather holds out

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Probably all down to disturbance - I was at Dane Bower on the Monday, 3+ Ring Ouzel in the area around the chimney, 10's of Wheatear,  Red Grouse calling and seen, 2+ Raven and nearby Dipper showing well at Derbyshire Bridge.

The Ouzels were back at least a week before - so I suspect that they were just keeping a low profileevileye!

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That's where I was going wrong then - too busy watching Ducati's and Honda Blackbirds !

I did see a female Merlin on a post though which was a bonus.

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eh up lad,you should really point out that you actively look out for motorbikes and when you post that you,ve seen a blackbird it might not be turdus merula
cheers geoffbiggrinbiggrin



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Common Redstart and Willow Warbler by Errwood Reservoir but strangely no Common Sandpiper yet.

No luck with Ring Ouzel at Danebower but plenty of Wheatear. Also bizzarely no sign of Red Grouse.

Loads of motorbikes - more like the TT up here.

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