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Post Info TOPIC: Blacktoft Sands RSPB


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RE: Blacktoft Sands -Goole


First visit last night to this wonderful reserve at the end of a day of Yorkshire Birding - birds seen included:

Marsh Harrier 4
Spoonbill 2
Curlew Sandpiper 7+
Little Stint 1
Spotted Redshank 1
Water Rail
Yellow Wags 2

Plus:
Redshank
Greenshank
Snipe
Ringed Plover
Dunlin
Little Egret
Shoveler
Teal
Heron

Will definitely visit again soon.



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Building my lifers


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late 3pm mooch


fifty snipe all in the long grass, usual ducks, teal, shovelar, single goldeneye, lots of dunlin, lapwing, from the singleton hide was merlin, barn owl and at one point 8 marsh harriers




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Did you see it? It was small and brown and flew that way.........................


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A good day out, even though the harriers were not very active.

Not spoiled by 1 idiot who sat for a while in Singleton, who spent 10 minutes going on about scopes and binoculars to someone else, loudly. Then another 10 on how it's better to joint the local RSPB group as local area groups can be funny with new members. Paul managed to miss him as was still at marshside photographing the wood sandpiper, the lucky git.

One really nice thing was the 9 year old with his parents, non birders, who was spending his birthday at Blacktoft and was thrilled to see the bearded tits, with help from my scope, and very excited to see 2 harriers in the air at once.

Anyway,
marsh harrier at least 5 female/youngsters and 1 male.
bearded tits too numerous to count, all youngsters and seemed to be showing well at all the hides.
greenshank, at least 3
spotted redshank, at least 5
several green sandpiper
common sandpiper, 1
wood sandpiper, 1
ruff, at least 20
reed warblers, 3
sedge warbler, 1
stock dove, 3
dunlin, over 30
black-tailed godwit over 30
yellow wagtails at least 5
merlin, 1

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11 july 2009

What a brilliant place to visit lots of different habitat for the birds and therefore lots of different birds .It was one of those days when you just didnt know which way to turn.Barn owl hunting over the reeds ,marsh harriers up in the air and perched in trees,bearded tits picking about in the mud,spotted redshanks doing battle with greenshanks,common redshank and blacktailed godwits for prime feeding positions.Green sandpiper having a go at the ruff and lots of warblers about sedge,reed,blackcap and whitethrote.I realy didnt want to leave this place but Bempton was calling and one of Vernons CAKESbiggrin.gif back at the car.
6 marsh harrier
6 bearded tits
2 greenshank
6 spotted redshank
1 greensandpiper
8 ruff
1 barn owl
1 kestrel
plus lots of the more common birds


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THE GREAT THING ABOUT BIRDING ISNT JUST THE BIRDS


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8 April 2009

A rare trip away from Elton to one of our favourite haunts gave us a relaxing afternoon watching Marsh Harriers. Ten were seen (5 males and 5 females). Two of the males were VERY pale - one almost looking like a male Hen Harrier. Fantastic views including food swaps.

Other birds seen included:
Yellow Wagtail 1
Sanderling 1
Redshank 3
Spotted Redshank 2
Avocet c70
LR Plover 2
Ruff 1
Black-tailed Godwit c50
Bearded Tit 2
Tree Sparrow c10

All-in-all a good day - and the weather was good (unlike on this side of the country!)

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Well done to all who saw this bird and no surprise in not identifying it as an Amur. The Amur has only recently been recognised in its own right anyway, as it was formerly the Eastern Red-footed Falcon. I remember seeing the Black-eared Kite last year in Norfolk, which was very far from its wintering grounds of South East Asia and Indonesia. At least this Amur Falcon was going in almost the right direction, seeking its wintering grounds in southern Africa, who knows what might turn up next!? smile.gif

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Quite simply Mike it's re-identification was relatively straight forward once it's 2nd generation pure white underwing coverts had begun moulting through, which I believe only began to happen a week or two ago.

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Ian McKerchar (forum administrator and owner)


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Does anyone else find it odd that all the discussion is about whether people could/should tick/list/whatever this particular bird, rather than the how and why of its' re-identification, together with the implications, if any, for sightings of non-adult red-foots in the future?

As an advocate of find-it-yourself birding I'd have thought that would have been of interest to you, Ian? Maybe we need another i.d. guide for the articles section. Field sketches only, of course, no photos

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You don't HAVE to be mad to go birding but :-D


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Simon Warford wrote:

Ian McKerchar wrote:

But i just wonder how much satisfaction comes from a tick with those circumstances?




as for satisfaction? That came im massive amounts from yesterdays morning at Elton, a morning which i will remember for a long time and was much better than any Armchair tick.smile.gif

-- Edited by Simon Warford at 13:22, 2008-10-19






Quite right too pal, a stunning morning all round indeed and the most impressive display of visible migration I've witnessed in the county myself.

As for identifying birds from photographs, as is an increasingly common occurrence for rarities these days, I'm afraid I fail to be as easy going about it as you about it

Armchair ticks are armchair ticks...ticks all the same and for those that care, go get 'em

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Ian McKerchar (forum administrator and owner)


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Ian McKerchar wrote:

But i just wonder how much satisfaction comes from a tick with those circumstances?




Not much satisfaction in the slightest Ian, but ive seen the bird and if its accepted as an Amur all well and good and im glad i went to Tophill Low when i did, i enjoyed watching the bird as a Red Foot at the time.. as for satisfaction? That came im massive amounts from yesterdays morning at Elton, a morning which i will remember for a long time and was much better than any Armchair tick.smile.gif

-- Edited by Simon Warford at 13:22, 2008-10-19

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Paul, I think it was more the contrasting underwing pattern in general I commented on and not the actual underwing coverts, which at the time we saw it, had definately not grown any white on themwink.gif

I as many other birders have had no previous experience with Amur Falcon, in fact it is only in two of my field guides.

Yes we had excellent views of the bird perched up and in flight and at the time I couldnt
have identified the bird as an Amur Falcon.

At the end of the day it would seem the bird stayed around long enough to be identified from photo's once it had started to develop its white underwing coverts. So what if it was identified from photo's thats the way birding is these days alot of the time, look at the Murelet in Devon and other recent rarities.

Whether i saw the bird after or before it was identified makes no real difference, my concience is clear but i will wait till its accepted officially firstsmile.gif

Would i have been elevated back to legandary status if I had identified it as an Amur?biggrin.gif


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i do remember simon remarking on the light underwing coverts...

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of course not having seen it myself and the only photo on the galleries involving such a pose that it would, for all intents and purposes, not be seperable from a red-foot, i go with what the photographers tell me...phew!

Fact is that the misidentification is no disgrace at all, not until it gained those 2nd generation underwing coverts anyway and all county birders i know saw it prior to this i think. But i just wonder how much satisfaction comes from a tick with those circumstances?

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Ian McKerchar (forum administrator and owner)


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Don't know about Simon's, but "slap" OML!

If I send a photo taken when it was thought to be a Red-foot how would you caption it on the Website?! biggrin.gif

-- Edited by Rob Smallwood at 22:55, 2008-10-18

-- Edited by Rob Smallwood at 23:16, 2008-10-18

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Rob


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Simon Warford wrote:

Sat 27th - Then on to Tophill Low for another raptor. This time a sparkling 1st summer male Red Footed Falcon performed on and off for us all afternoon and gave wonderful views hunting dragonflies sometimes just above our heads.






Oh dear Now reidentified as an Amur Falcon, are you going to count it How's your concience

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Ian McKerchar (forum administrator and owner)


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Simon Warford wrote:

Sat 27th - visited Blacktoft with Paul Cliff and Melanie Beckford. Possible distant Honey Buzzard flying west late am plus definate Hobby, Merlin, Marsh Harrier, male Sparrowhawk with prey and several Kestrel. A nice group of 9 Bearded Tits gave excellent views both on the mud and perched on the tops of reeds from Marshland Hide, also water rail but few waders just Spotted Redshanks and Ruff of any note.

Then on to Tophill Low for another raptor. This time a sparkling 1st summer male Red Footed Falcon performed on and off for us all afternoon and gave wonderful views hunting dragonflies sometimes just above our heads. With several Buzzards here and more sparrowhawks it turned out to be a decent raptor daysmile.gif

On the water several Pintail amongst the hundreds of tufteds and the adult winter Black Necked Grebe remained, all in all an enjoyable outing.smile.gif

t'was a great day out,a proper Raptor-fest,the Bearded Tits were a lifer for me but the display the Red Footed Falcon put on had us all stunned,never dreamed or hoped to see such a show......brilliant!! and the company was good too biggrin.gif






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Sat 27th - visited Blacktoft with Paul Cliff and Melanie Beckford. Possible distant Honey Buzzard flying west late am plus definate Hobby, Merlin, Marsh Harrier, male Sparrowhawk with prey and several Kestrel. A nice group of 9 Bearded Tits gave excellent views both on the mud and perched on the tops of reeds from Marshland Hide, also water rail but few waders just Spotted Redshanks and Ruff of any note.

Then on to Tophill Low for another raptor. This time a sparkling 1st summer male Red Footed Falcon performed on and off for us all afternoon and gave wonderful views hunting dragonflies sometimes just above our heads. With several Buzzards here and more sparrowhawks it turned out to be a decent raptor daysmile.gif

On the water several Pintail amongst the hundreds of tufteds and the adult winter Black Necked Grebe remained, all in all an enjoyable outing.smile.gif



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Hi Simon

I try to get over there a couple of times each year - unfortunately missed this year so far. Looks like you had a superb day.

Definitely one of my favourite places for birding.

Rgds

Mike

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Oh and i forgot 197 Blackwit!

Was a good day out, a couple of the hides had plenty of mud and the waders were all close so had really good views. Was good fun picking the Little Stints and Curlew Sands out from the Dunlin. Defo worth a call in on the way back from Spurn if nowts doing! ya never know we might get a red-necked stint or a marbled godwit!!

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Bury year list - 136 latest - Whooper Swan


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sue and I are going on Wednesday - be nice to see a few more waders.

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Nice list Si, almost as good as Rumworth! biggrin.gif Maybe we should call in if spurn is poor in two weeks, good selection of waders at Tophil Low too.

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Blacktoft Sands RSPB


Waders galoure of all ages and plumage.

Curlew Sand 7
Little Stint 3
Green Sand 8+
Dunlin 100+
Ruff 32
Greenshank 9
Golden Plover 151+
Spot Redshank 13
Ringed Plover 10
Curlew 2
Snipe 15
Lapwing & Redshank uncounted. Also Wigeon, Gadwall, Teal, 20+ Yellow Wag, 4 Marsh Harrier inc pair food passing, Barn Owl, Bearded Tits, Tree Sparrow, Whitethroat, Reed Warbler etc etc

-- Edited by Ian McKerchar on Monday 17th of September 2012 03:18:50 PM

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