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Post Info TOPIC: Bee-eater nesting attempt in Greater Manchester


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RE: Bee-eater nesting attempt in Greater Manchester


Couldn't agree more,welfare of the birds MUST always come first.
Such a shame that they were unsuccessful.

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Entirely agree with the need to protect the birds and nesting site and tragic that the nests seem to have failed. Thanks to all concerned and to Ian for the news. Fingers crossed for a second attempt or for next year. I also take Dave's point about climate change though the proliferation of Cetti's warblers was the klaxon for me. On the plus side, even if it's never possible to view the nesting site we can hope to see bee-eaters on passage and not be guilty of wishful thinking.

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Stunning news, but sad to hear that the attempt failed. Fully appreciate the need for discretion with this. The small trend of this species nesting in the UK since the turn of the century is always amazing to hear about, but at the same time is a reminder of the rapid change in climate. The Bee-eater in a quarry is the 21st century equivalent of a Canary in a coal mine.

-- Edited by dave broome on Friday 21st of July 2023 09:48:52 AM

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Stunning!

Well done all concerned for keeping the birds' welfare ahead of birders & toggers, and managing to keep it quiet. Disappointed not to see them, but the Trimingham ones were fantastic



-- Edited by John Watson on Friday 21st of July 2023 11:06:44 AM

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Amazing and totally agree that this was the best course of action. Well done to all involved. Fingers crossed for next year smile



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A pair of Bee-eaters have bred at an undisclosed site in Greater Manchester but unfortunately today, it appears the birds have abandoned and departed the area, possibly due to predation or some form of internal collapse of the nest burrow.

The birds first appeared in mid-June and quickly began breeding activity at a location which simply did not lend itself to large scale viewing, which would likely have caused disturbance to the birds. Discussions immediately took place with the most senior members of the RSPB Investigations Team who have dealt with all previous Bee-eater nesting attempts in the UK and under their expert guidance the news was supressed for the birdsí welfare. Further discussions and daytime nest watching and protection took place by a small but incredibly diligent team of local observers.†

It is believed that the first chick(s) likely hatched around the 13th†July and with that, The Head of RSPB Investigations had intended to attend the site with the local observation team this Saturday 22nd†July with a view to plan and potentially implement some form of public viewing once it was believed all the chicks had hatched and were near to fledging, in order to reduce the potential for any disturbance. Unfortunately, it seems luck was not on our, or more importantly, the Bee-eatersí side.

The site will remain confidential in the hope the birds may return next year and will get to a point where viewing may be permissible, but I would like to assure all observers that all possibilities for large-scale viewing prior to this point were considered but the birdsí welfare simply had to come first.



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