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Post Info TOPIC: OTHER WILDLIFE DISCUSSION THREAD


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RE: OTHER WILDLIFE DISCUSSION THREAD


Lancashire and Cheshire Fauna Society (http://www.lacfs.org.uk/ ) and Butterfly Conservation Lancashire ( http://butterfly-conservation.org/306-15427/lancashire-butterfly-conservation-helps-fund-ground-breaking-new-micro-moths-book-micro-moth-field-tips.html )  have jointly published Micro Moth Field Tips by Ben Smart, an excellent book containing 1000 photographs, with extensive text on finding larval stages of micro moths, relating to those species found in Lancashire and Cheshire. It's arranged chronologically so as to give a guide on what to look for year-round. Cost is £16 details at http://www.lancashiremoths.co.uk/

 



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dave broome wrote:

The British Dragonfly Society are promoting The Dragonfly Challenge, involving counting dragonflies seen at any waterbody, including garden ponds, on a chosen day between 15th-23rd July

www.british-dragonflies.org.uk





Might give that a go down at Abram. Had loads last week.

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The British Dragonfly Society are promoting The Dragonfly Challenge, involving counting dragonflies seen at any waterbody, including garden ponds, on a chosen day between 15th-23rd July

www.british-dragonflies.org.uk



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The forthcoming British Wildlife Publishing 'Field Guide to the Bees of Great Britain and Ireland' by Stephen Falk and illustrated by the hugely talented Richard Lewington looks like it should be a good one. Apparently the first comprehensive guide (270 species) in over a hundred years. Available to pre-order at a discount, in hardback or softback, at britishwildlife.com 



-- Edited by dave broome on Saturday 24th of October 2015 10:42:59 PM

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Small Red-eyed Damselfly


Worth keeping an eye open for Small Red-eyed Damselfly in Greater Manchester. They have been discovered for the first time in Cheshire this month and have been making a steady northward advance since the first colonists arrived in Essex (?) or Kent (?) around 15 years ago.

They fly fairly late in the year so look out for them on floating or semi-submerged vegetation.

Cheers John

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RE: OTHER WILDLIFE DISCUSSION THREAD


A new iRecord app for the recording of Grasshoppers, Crickets and related species is useful, as it includes calls. It's free and doesn't require much memory on your phone or other device either.

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Another run-in with the squirel. Burleigh rd,Stretford, street tree feeders. . . . . . . . Thought i'd got rid of it . .wrong! It used to be a nervous squirel but after squirting it quite a few times it adapted and sat out of range. Now it's adapted again and does'nt bother about getting wet (just like a "Borg squirel"). Getting wet annoyed it so it came down to the main fork to pick up dropped seeds . I soaked it again ! It adapted and went to the pavement to feed. Soaked again, it returned to the feeders not bothered at all by the water. It seemed "Resistance was Futile !" . . . . I remembered I had an extendeable 12ft fibre-glass pole + my height 5' 6" total on tip- toes well over 18ft . . . . This did the trick ! It will adapt again but the birds are back at least.

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psk


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Hiya Jon ..... I watched a few frogs spawning up on top of Harrop Edge (Stalybridge) on Friday morning.

They tend to be late every year. Don't get much choice up there ...... these little quarry ponds were still frozz solid last week-end.

Roger.

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Finally got some frogspawn in my garden pond in Horwich, first time ever. Wasn't there yesterday but a good clump is there this morning. Don't know whether this is late or not for spawning?

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A few honey bees were active today at the entrance to a hive near ashton-in-makerfield. Is this likely to have been to down to some kind of maintenance by the keeper? There were quite a few dead below the entrance.

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well done you two don't forget to submit via rodis at gmeu!!

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On the 27th June myself and Dave Winnard attempted a Greater Manchester wildlife day race for something a little different. Everything could be counted so long as it was positively identified and appearing to be wild or naturalised. If you thought a bird race was tough this was something else as the physical and mental stamina was put to the test. It was decided that the main focus would be the plants as this group holds the most potential diversity for a day's outing. We set the target at 500 species in total.

Starting off in my neck of the woods, Hale Barns, at 4am we had a full hike around the area before moving on to the airport. After a short stop there we went onto Dunham Park, Carrington Moss, Brookhey's Covert and Altrincham Sewage Works, all good local sites for birds as well as flowers. Although we hadn't gone far, quite a few miles had already been covered and it was already noon. Time to head on to Pomona Docks and the adjacent Bridgewater Canal which plays host to a myriad of unusual species found nowhere else in the county. A quick stop at the unusual wildlife site of Southern Cemetery by Chorlton to check the spoil mounds at the rear of the site before we moved onto the Wigan area. Here, we had a long wander around the Wigan Flashes, quick stop at Pennington Flash and then the nearby county jewel of Highfield Moss. It was about 6pm by the time we left this site, a lot later than planned! Prestwich Sewage Works was a must with it's odd collection of coastal plant species, before we had another long hike around Moses Gate CP and the former industrial site of Nob End LNR. Last stop was at Seven Acres CP where in the failing light we picked up a few final plant species bringing the day to a close at 10.30pm.

It's taken a couple of days to finalize the species list but it came to a credible 600 species, surpassing the target for the day. About 450 species of the total were the plants. The gauntlet is set for anyone else who is mad enough to have a crack! A few personal highlights included:

- 10 species of orchid including Bee, Chalk Fragrant, Marsh Helleborine, Pyramidal and Common Twayblade.
- Marsh Fragrant Orchid at Nob End LNR - first confirmed for GM
Chinese and Himalayan Giant Brambles - both introduced but new in my experience.
- Fig-leaved Goosefoot, Shepherd's-cress and Corn Spurrey - at Southern Cemetery.
- Perennial Coneflower, Dropwort, Common Meadow-rue and Pyrennean Lily - at Altrincham ETW
- Yellow-wort, Blue Fleabane, Common Cudweed, Bur Chervil, Deadle Nightshade, Kidney Vetch, Biting Stonecrop, Black Mustard and Hare's-foot Clover - at Pomona and Bridgewater Canal
- Blue Water-speedwell, Viper's Bugloss, White Mignonette, Pale Toadflax and Bladder Campion - at Wigan Flashes
- Petty Whin, Western Gorse, Round-leaved Sundew, Cross-leaved Heath and Black Horehound at Highfield Moss.
- Sea Club-rush and Sea Radish - at Prestwich ETW
- Duck-potatoe and Narrow-leaved Water-plantain - at Seven Acres CP
- A decent show of fungi for June including Giant Puffball, Blackening Waxcap, Chicken-of-the-woods, Yellow-stainer, Blusher, Hazel Woodwort, a large selection of fungal plant pathogens (mildews and rusts etc) plus a potential first for GM in the form of Alder Cramp Balls (Daldinia petriniae) at Wigan Flashes.
- 70 bird species - casually added during the day, including Kingfisher, Yellow Wagtail, Siskin, Green Woodpecker and Lesser Whitethroat.
- Red-eyed Damselfly at Dunham Massey among 7 Odonata species

-- Edited by Ian McKerchar on Saturday 30th of June 2012 12:10:16 AM

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Henry Cook wrote:

Sale WP isn't brilliant Joe. Not sure why, but possibly because of lack of shallow areas and large numbers of fish.

Dunham Park is one of the best sites in the area with 15 species of dragon and damselfly possible in the season. Check Smithy pool in summer for GM's only colony of Red-eyed Damselfly. The park also has the beautiful Banded Demoiselle Damselfly. In Spring keep an eye out for the Hairy Hawker which is rapidly expanding it's UK distribution, dunham Park had GM's first record a couple of years ago.
Other species to be seen around the park include: Azure Damselfly, Common Blue Damselfly, Blue-tailed Damselfly, Large Red Damselfly, Broad-bodied Chaser, Four-spotted Chaser, Common Hawker, Southern Hawker, Migrant Hawker, Brown Hawker, Emperor Dragonfly and Common Darter.
Red-veined Darter may also be possible here in future summers.





Ian Boote wrote:

A bit further away from Henry's hot spot is the compact Darcy Lever Gravel Pits Bolton. Eighteen species seen at last count I think including Ruddy Darter and Black Darter and few people with dogs. Which is rather nice.





Thanks guys, brilliant information! I didn't think sale'd be that good, I have only seen Common Blue Damselfly there in the past. Only just starting to appreciate Dragonflies and Damselflies through macro photography, but already enjoying it immensely!

Thanks again,

Joe

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A bit further away from Henry's hot spot is the compact Darcy Lever Gravel Pits Bolton. Eighteen species seen at last count I think including Ruddy Darter and Black Darter and few people with dogs. Which is rather nice.

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Sale WP isn't brilliant Joe. Not sure why, but possibly because of lack of shallow areas and large numbers of fish.

Dunham Park is one of the best sites in the area with 15 species of dragon and damselfly possible in the season. Check Smithy pool in summer for GM's only colony of Red-eyed Damselfly. The park also has the beautiful Banded Demoiselle Damselfly. In Spring keep an eye out for the Hairy Hawker which is rapidly expanding it's UK distribution, dunham Park had GM's first record a couple of years ago.
Other species to be seen around the park include: Azure Damselfly, Common Blue Damselfly, Blue-tailed Damselfly, Large Red Damselfly, Broad-bodied Chaser, Four-spotted Chaser, Common Hawker, Southern Hawker, Migrant Hawker, Brown Hawker, Emperor Dragonfly and Common Darter.
Red-veined Darter may also be possible here in future summers.

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Does anyone know if Sale Water Park is good for dragonflies, or anywhere around that sort of vicinity?
Thanks,
Joe

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Most parts of Carrington Moss seem to attract Brimstones.

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The only one I recall seeing last year locally (really must keep records !) was at Pennington Flash in May....

Here is a link to distribution records for Brimstone in Lancashire (GM incorporated):

http://www.lancashire-butterflies.org.uk/Dist_maps/Thumbs/brimstone.html

(courtesy of Lancashire Branch of Butterfly Conservation)


-- Edited by Ian Woosey on Tuesday 13th of March 2012 10:10:54 PM

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I agree with Steve, Barlow Tip is always worth a punt. Had Brimstones there last
April, though none in March as memory serves.
Tony.


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hi joe, try barlow tip,chorlton water park i recall seeing them there last year.
good luck. steve.

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saburke


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Hi joe, wigan flashes are a safe bet during during spring particularly around bryn marsh. They should be out in force in the next few weeks. They do look great in the sunshine

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I'm no expert (obviously), but does anyone know where's a good spot for brimstone butterfly? They're one i've always seen on pictures but i'd love to see one in real life!
Cheers,
Joe

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stuart lewis-gough wrote:

There is a population of mink along the river irwell near forest bank,not that far away from monton. They seem to be spreading everywhere.





That's quite correct Stuart. Mink have been populating the Irwell for at least 40 years. In the early 1970's the A.L.F. released a great many Mink from fur farms, some of which were near the start of the Irwell and the Mink have made their way towards Manchester and beyond ever since. They are also being seen around the Salford Quays area and along the Ship canal.

A lot of British wildlife will suffer because of the Mink

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Dave Thacker


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There is a population of mink along the river irwell near forest bank,not that far away from monton. They seem to be spreading everywhere.

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Dean
A very good description of a Mink and the first report I have heard of from on the Golf course. Last year [ Oct+Nov] I did hear of two probable sightings of Mink near the mini Lighthouse on the Bridgewater canal in Monton which is pretty close to the golf club.



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Dave Thacker


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How big was it Dean? Dave Thacker had a pole cat/ferret cross in the woods (last year I think?) but if it was constantly in the water then worryingly it does sound like mink

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Sounds like Mink...

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Originally posted by Dean Traynor today:

Worsley Golf Course:

weasel type mammal, roaming in and out of pond near 3rd green. soot black with white markings on chest. not sure what it is, any ideas?


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Not so much a wildlife sighting but came across a group of about 40 fox hunters some in red coats complete with around 20 to 30 hounds heading down vicarshall lane and over the canal bridge 1330 today. never seen this around here before , it was quite surreal. come across a hunt in the cotswolds and one in appley bridge and each time i feel myself getting irrate at what they stand for , just hope they did nt come across any quarry.

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Dave

That brings back memories about Botany Bay and the mosses in the 70's. The gamekeepers in those days didn't mess about, all types of traps and snares were being used and there was always some wildlife hanging on a barb wire fence. The worst thing that I saw was finding a dying Fox caught by his leg in a small gin trap, a terrible death.
I have to admit that any trap I found after finding the Fox were "accidentally fixed" so they could not work again.

Also in the 70's while birdwatching in Norfolk I found a scarecrow made from at least 30 dead Magpies. In the same area I found 3 Larson traps each containing a live Magpie.

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Dave Thacker


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Worst gibbet i ever came across was in botany bay wood 30 years ago, foxes, tawny owls, stoats, magpies. truly gruesome.

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They classed as pests and can be killed. Hanging or pegging them up was and is called a gamekeepers gibbet to prove to the land owner how effective they are doing. grim. i have seen them in derbyshire about 20 years ago.

-- Edited by Ian Boote on Monday 21st of November 2011 11:05:37 PM

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Originally posted by Martyn Jones today:

Down Rindle Road this afternoon I was appalled to find a 'gamekeepers gibbet' of moles strung up on a barbed wire fence in the field just before the signal box cottage. Does anyone know if this practice is still legal? It seems barbaric to me. (Pictures on my blog if you really want to see them - address below).


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Steve Atkins wrote:

Hi Joe,

You might like to read the article on Mountain Hare written by Ken Gartside which is on the GM Local Record Centre website. Mountain Hare

See the section on Life Cycle.

Cheers


Steve





Thanks steve, I was going to go this month, but i'll probably wait until december.



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Hi Joe,

You might like to read the article on Mountain Hare written by Ken Gartside which is on the GM Local Record Centre website. Mountain Hare

See the section on Life Cycle.

Cheers


Steve



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Last march I watched Mountain Hares in the pennines in their white coat. I was wondering, when do they get the winter colours?
Cheers,
Joe

-- Edited by Joe Wynn on Saturday 5th of November 2011 10:13:19 AM

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There are no recent records in GM though there are a few sites just over the border.

Dave

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DISCOVER THE WILD Facebook Page - Discover the Wild


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Dear forum members

Does anyone please know if the adder is found in any parts of Greater Manchester and if so which?
Thanks

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Ian Chisnall


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-- Edited by Ian McKerchar on Sunday 2nd of October 2011 08:11:03 PM

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