MB

 

Members Login
Username 
 
Password 
    Remember Me  
Post Info TOPIC: Northumberland


Status: Offline
Posts: 3172
Date:
RE: Northumberland


Of interest with reference to my post below 06/06/21 when I went to see the Red-necked Stint

I was contacted earlier this year by Northumberland birder Jack Bucknall who is also a member of the county rarities committee. He asked if I could submit a record for the Rose-coloured Starling that I saw that day, to Tim Dean, the Northumberland county recorder.
I explained that that was not a problem but I didnt have any photographic evidence to support the submission, to which his reply was that it stood a very good chance of being accepted anyway.

I submitted the record and then a couple of weeks ago I received an email from Tim Dean himself to say the submission was fully assessed and accepted by the committee. They are using the record in their annual report Birds of Northumbria 2021.
I was made up with that as I didnt think it would stand a chance.

__________________


Status: Offline
Posts: 511
Date:

From Beadnell heading south along coast to Newton Pool Nature reserve and return.

Gannet (5)
Turnstone (7)
Golden Plover (2)
Eider Duck (10)
Black Tailed Godwit (3)
Redshank (20)
Curlew (100)
Ringed Plover (5)
Pink Footed Geese (300)
Greylag Geese (2)
Avocet (2)
Wigeon (55)
Shelduck (15)
Oystercatcher (50)
Shoveler (4)
Stonechat (12)
Lapwing (4)
Dunlin (5)
Teal (4)
Kestrel (3)
Buzzard (1)
Skylark (30)
Meadow Pipit (20)
Rook (10)
Carrion Crow (25)
Jackdaw (7)
Grey Heron (3)
Pied Wagtail (10)
Cormorant (3)
Dunnock (1)
Mallard (10)
Magpie (4)
Woodpigeon (40)
Starling (10)
Black-Headed Gull (40)
Great Black-Backed Gull (2)
Herring Gull (10)
Pheasant (1)



__________________


Status: Offline
Posts: 3172
Date:

Just to add to the post below

I was contacted on Twitter by Jack Bucknall, a member of the Northumberland Bird Club Rarities Committee. He was asked to contact me by the county recorder Tim Dean so that my Rose-coloured Starling sighting could be fully documented and submitted.
I have done that for them, and I hope it is more successful than my submission to the Welsh Rarities Comm of the adult White-tailed Eagle at Cricceth which was not accepted?

__________________


Status: Offline
Posts: 3172
Date:

Sunday 6th June.

North Blyth (Blyth Estuary).

So I was browsing Twitter last night and saw the sighting just as Ians text came through so the idea of going for a rare one was taking shape.
Took a chance, as you do with distance twitches, 3.45am start, notification of the bird still being present came through at 4.26am, there at 6.30am, left at 8.45am, back home 11.30am.
Nice to see some familiar faces including Paul Baker.

- Red-necked Stint (Lifer)
Bit difficult to locate at first as it was in amongst the Ringed Plovers on the distant north shore and remained distant for much of my visit. It became mobile however and disappeared around the estuary bend, but it was refound and had landed a little closer so good scope views were had.
A cracking little bird in full breeding attire so once on it, I barely lost it again.
No sign of the Little Stint for me!

Also...
- c20+ Goosanders
- 6 Common Eider
- 3 Teal (2 drake)
- 4 Raven over
- and then unbelievably just as I was driving away out of Cowley Road from the main site, a Rose-coloured Starling flew right infront of my car and looked to drop into the MacDonalds car park area, I had a quick look but there was no sign of it.


-- Edited by Rob Creek on Sunday 6th of June 2021 10:47:54 PM

-- Edited by Rob Creek on Sunday 6th of June 2021 11:11:26 PM

-- Edited by Rob Creek on Sunday 6th of June 2021 11:12:18 PM

Attachments
__________________


Status: Offline
Posts: 163
Date:

Northumberland 4th to 6th October 2020

With lots of rare birds being in the country e.g. Two Barred Greenish Warbler, Siberian Thrush etc and as my lady friend and I had planned a trip up to Amble in Northumberland, you can imagine how I felt when a Red Flanked Bluetail had been found on Holy Island on Saturday! We left Lancashire early on Sunday morning heading up the M6 and onto an unfamiliar road to myself, the A69 across to Newcastle and onto the A1. News on the way that the Red Flanked Bluetail was still at The Snook on Holy Island seemed to help the rest of the journey. We arrived and immediately realised that there had been a large fall of migrants overnight as a few Redstart then a Ring Ouzel were seen in the first few yards. Around 30 birders present were split into two groups as we got to The Snook at this point we asked about the Bluetail and given good directions. The bird was seen perching low down in the small trees and catching prey items, the Robin`s did not seem to like the Bluetail and chased it about. This was only my second ever sighting of this beautiful migrant to our country, my lady friend really enjoyed seeing it, but also enjoyed being part of her first twitch. In the farm garden, Spotted and Pied Flycatchers were seen along with around 30+ Goldcrest that would allow you to watch them avidly feeding down to a couple of feet away. More Redstart`s scattered around the area and then news of a Lesser Grey Shrike, Red Breasted Flycatcher, Yellow Browed Warbler had my head spinning! Also seen: 60+ Pink footed Geese, Lesser Whitethroat, Chiffchaff, Bar tailed Godwit, Curlew, Redshank, and Lapwing. We had a walk around Lindisfarne, saw the still closed castle then enjoyed a pint and a snack. As we strolled along we met a birder who told us that the RB Flycatcher & Yellow Browed Warbler were showing very well in the Vicars Garden As I passed through the Priory I met a birder who took me to the right garden and he told me, That this is the mecca for birders in Northumberland due to the amount of rare birds that have been found in there. As we searched I noticed a couple of familiar people also looking, it was only Maurice and Lyndsey McCann that I had last seen on a Birdfinders trip to China in 2017! The flycatcher and warbler were soon seen and I dashed away to the car park to drive away and not get stuck in the incoming tide. Quite a day really enjoyed by us both.

With the news that the Bluethroat had not been seen on Boulmer beach, near Alnwick, we decided to visit a Great Grey Shrike that had been seen near Seaton Point caravan site near Boulmer. As we passed through the village a couple of quite late Swallows were seen resting on the telephone wires, probably the last we will see this year! A few birders were present looking in the distance for the Shrike, the news that it had not been seen for a while did not help, but after 10 minutes or so the Shrike was seen sat on top of a distant hawthorn bush about 400 yards away, but in good light it was seen very well. It was nice to be able to combine a bit of birding in with a nice break in a lovely county that is Northumberland.

Dave O.



__________________


Status: Offline
Posts: 3910
Date:

I finally gave in and decided to take a trip to Holy Island, Northumberland today. I got up at dawn but a leisurely satrt saw me on the road at 4.45am. A good run and I was there at 8.15am, much quicker than the predicted 4hrs on 'routefinder' even with a substantial diversion due to overninght work on the M62.

News of the warbler was 'late' today with it coming through on RBA at 6.40am rather than an hour earlier as for the last 2 days, that had the nerves jangling a bit! I headed off into the Snook dunes and found a small gathering of only about 12 birders clustered around a pine. The sweet, unusual trilling warble coming out of the pine signified that my quarry was present and soon I got nice binocular views of the adult male Asian Desert Warbler. We watched it for a while as it moved about in the pine, sometimes sitting out & it gave fabulous scoped views as it sang its heart out. I took in all the features and enjoyed the bird before attempting to digiscope it, which was a pig to do! Just once the warbler came onto a bare tree and preened and sunbathed for all of 10 seconds and I got my shots, record ones but shots nonetheless. The bird moved to new pines a couple of times but was always found due to it singing all the time. As time passed views were poorer, so early morning seems the best time. Lots more birders were arriving and social distancing seemed less easier so mentioning this myself and two thers decided to leave the crowd to it. A nice lifer, which are now getting few and far between given my UK lifelist is near 500.

Other birds added to my depleted 2020 yearlist included Arctic Terns off Holy Island, Pintail at Budle Bay and a lone female Eider also at Budle Bay. I tried to visit Hauxley NR but it was shut due to Covid-19 and did call in at Druridge Bay Country Park but that was like Blackpool seafront with folk everywhere, so I ate my lunch inside my car and left without getting out. I still think we should bird with caution as the pandemic isn't over and we all have a responsibility to be careful.



-- Edited by Doc Brewster on Saturday 20th of June 2020 04:27:40 PM

__________________
facebook


Status: Offline
Posts: 3172
Date:

Wednesday 17th June

Left home 3.40am, arrived at Holy Island 7.20am, off the island for 9.45am well before the tide started coming in, and was back home for 1.35pm.

Google maps said 3h38mins (normal route time) but routed me - A1(M), A19, Tyne Tunnel, then onto A1 further up, usual route said 4hrs so must?ve been a delay. Drove through some of the worst dense fog I?ve ever seen for a lot of the journey, with an underlying mist still present in the clearer patches, and was quite foggy on the island too which didn?t help.

- Asian Desert Warbler (Lifer)
Chanced it early morning and then nearly 2 hrs into the journey a report came in at 5.30am that the bird was still there.
Never been on the island before and I?d read online that the wrong times were being given for safe crossings so I waited for a few mins for another car to pass me and I followed through the mist.
Luckily the bird was showing and only a 5 minute walk from the car, so it wasn?t going to be an Ainsdale Dunes mission where you finally make it back to the car 2 weeks later.
What a cracking little bird, some lovely features including a bright yellow iris, chestnut tertials, rump and tail feathers, the white outer tail feathers, and an unusual beautiful song much more delicate and melodic than the Collins app one, reminiscent of Woodlark mixed with Willow Warbler.
The bird showed well at times, but was quite mobile and ranged over a widish area, at one point flying a good 500yds away and had to be relocated by song. It was favouring small pines, privet bushes, and the thorny bushes that looked like Acacia type (?).

Other birds on the island...
- 1 Whitethroat (with the Asian Desert Warbler)
- 1 Stonechat
- 2m Reed Bunting
- Lots of Meadow Pipit and Skylark

- 2 Quail
Pulled over en-route for a call of nature near to South Kilvington. I glanced up and I got a good look at the bird as it flew low over the A19 and fairly close to me. It dropped into the field nearby and I lost it.
I had another one fly low over the car on the A1 near Swarland, I just knew what it was straight away.
I?ve heard plenty of Quail, and seen only 1 briefly in Cyprus so I was made up seeing these. Small but they had longer wings than I imagined, surprisingly strong flyers too I thought.








Attachments
__________________


Status: Offline
Posts: 1148
Date:

Eastern Yellow Wagtail still present yesterday at Prestwick Carr, Northumberland. The first winter bird is still favouring the horse paddocks, roughly one hundred yards north of the Prestwick Carr Road crossroads.

Attachments
__________________
https://flickr.com/photos/44931335@N06


Status: Offline
Posts: 163
Date:

Eastern Yellow Wagtail at Prestwick Carrs, Northumberland. 22/12/2019

In what seems to be the year of the above named full species, the chance for a few of our team again presented itself to see one. It was found on Sunday the 15th December in a flooded horse paddock and remained all week. We got a team together consisting of Steve B, Bob K and two birding friends from Huddersfield, Dave W and Rob D. We met at 6-45am near Outlane, Huddersfield with Dave W driving. It was wet, gloomy and generally wintery as we made our way up the A1 towards Newcastle, then around 8-30am news that the bird was still present spurred us on. Reaching the correct place at about 9-15am we had no trouble seeing this very rare visitor to our shores. The wagtail landed about 10 feet in front of us in a bare hawthorn hedge and showed really well. A Pink footed Goose skein of about 40 birds passed over, then a small flock of Golden Plover and along with an assortment of small passerine birds kept us entertained.

After a hastily called meeting we decided to try to find the Black Grouse in the Langdon Beck/road to St John`s Chapel in County Durham. Whilst travelling over the tops you could not fail to be amazed at how beautiful this area is even in winter. Views over to Cross Fell brought back some great memories of the day we climbed said mountain! As we turned off the B6277 we saw a few birders watching something in the grassy fields, we joined them and were soon admiring about 35+ Black Grouse in winter plumage. Quite a stunning sight really with lots of grey hens to admire and the males without their red wattles, but still having their distinctive white rump and lyre shaped tail.

After checking for bird news, which was a bit sparse, we decided to head east for Redcar and South Gare near Middlesbrough. At Redcar we saw: - A flock of 10 Red Throated Divers fly past, Eider, Common Scoter, Red Breasted Merganser but the hoped for Velvet Scoter and Long Tailed Duck could not be found. A nice flock of waders including: - Sanderling, Turnstone, Knot, Redshank and Oystercatcher caught the eye of our photographers as the light was really good. At South Gare we saw a Great Northern Diver fairly close inshore but perhaps as the light was beginning to fade on the shortest day of the year, not much else presented itself. Twite were heard, 4 Goldfinch and a flock of Reed Buntings were the last birds of the day. Dave W did really well driving us back to Huddersfield after a long and very fruitful day.

Dave O.



Attachments
__________________


Status: Offline
Posts: 1142
Date:

A few highlights from a weeks visit to Northumberland.

Long-billed Dowitcher 1
Sabine's Gull 1Juv.
Snow Bunting 2
Spotted Redshank 2
Black-throated Diver 1
Slavonian Grebe 3
Little Auk 3
Sandwich Tern 1
Swallow 2 Juv.
Long-tailed Duck
Scaup
Red-throated Diver 7
Red-breasted Mergansers
etc.etc.etc.

With the wife, so not high intensity birding!

__________________
Phil Greenwood


Status: Offline
Posts: 1549
Date:

A full sextet of Oldham+ birders headed north of the wall today on a wild goose chase. Due to mis-heard directions some of us missed the 'warm-up' act but were all present when the star turn Richardson's Cackling Goose did its' party trick of appearing at the back of the flock, exiting stage left behind some (tree-sized!) conifer 'bushes' then reappearing in the same starting position to repeat the performance. The addition of a flock of sheep to the field provided better reference points to enable all of us to see the bird on its' second appearance.

We then headed up to Goswick Golf Club where the Long-tailed Skua was being watched on the 14th(?) green. The bird flew off east over the dunes just as we arrived, then apparently turned south and moved back round behind us. As we headed back towards its' reportedly more favoured haunts the bird re-appeared and settled on one of the track-side greens only to be flushed by some over-enthusiastic players trying to point it out. It then headed back north toward the furthest greens and out of view before re-appearing yet again heading back south along the links section of the course, mobbed by crows. We headed back to our original viewpoint and where treated to some more effortless flying displays at close range before it headed off on another circuit. As more and more golfers appeared the bird remained airborne for most of the time only settling once on one of the middle greens for a short while before heading north again. As we were leaving the bird was still heading towards the northernmost end of the course, presumably to continue its' patrols.

The 'dirty stop-outs ' in the group then took the coast route home, stopping for a quick scan of the Coquet estuary and picturesque views of Warkworth Castle before calling in at Druridge pools to watch the Red-necked Phalarope. Something had flushed all the wildfowl just as we entered the hide but they quickly returned, followed by the Phalarope, which seemed to be using the Shoveler to disturb small invertebrates, as it followed them into the junctus channels to the right of the hide. Like the Cackling Goose it was then re-found well to our left by the dad of a young family of birders who had failed to see their first ones on a trip to the Northern Isles earlier this year. Two Phalaropes on successive Sundays. smile What odds on a Wilson's next weekend? - Roughly 100000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000 to 1 I think biggrin.Oh and a Pomarine for a quartet of Skuas would be nice.

-- Edited by Mike Chorley on Monday 16th of October 2017 01:48:06 AM

__________________


Status: Offline
Posts: 3172
Date:

Sunday.
Next visit was to Budle Bay a mere 20mins away and on the way home.

- Richardson's Cackling Goose 1 (Lifer)

I pulled up at the lay-by overlooking the bay and I noticed a few familiar faces in the small crowd scanning the 100's of Barnacle Geese.
One guy suddenly said he was onto a Canada Goose but could only see the head popping up. I gave it a scan but I couldn't see anything.
A group of birders walked off up te road to try to get a better angle on this possible Goose as it was obscured by a tree.

At that point I suddenly picked out a Canada Goose type and it was nowhere near any trees. I shouted it up and everyone started getting on it.
A small Goose, barely the size of the Barnacle Geese, small rounded blunt face, short neck??? I'd only gone and found it. One guy came running over and shook my hand saying "cheers mate, I've been here all day looking".
Another birder then asked me to get him onto the bird, which I did, and after I recognised him as the birder from Spurn who doubted my Wryneck earlier in the year! confuse
A bit later, the original group came back over to the lay-by when they heard we were on it, that's the part when I spent 15 minutes repeating the directions to the Goose whereabouts!
Nice to have found or at least refound it from yesterday) for everybody else to enjoy.




Attachments
__________________


Status: Offline
Posts: 3172
Date:

Sunday 15th October.

A 3hrs 20min drive from Denton saw me arrive at Goswick Golf Club at 9am.

- Long-tailed Skua 1 juv (Lifer)
Only 3 or 4 birders around looking for the Skua, and I soon picked up on the bird not far from the car park, but it was mobile due to one individual running around trying to get closer when it landed and in the process was driving it away. In the end I piped up and said something along the lines of I've not travelled all this way for you to keep scaring it off!

What happened then was crazy, one guy was walking along the path and he obviously hadn't seen the Skua landed on the path he was walking on, I said "stay still mate it's infront of you", he stopped in his tracks, looked down and finally clocked it. The Skua then started walking towards him and started drinking from a puddle just infront of his feet, the guy just looked up at us and started laughing as it wasn't phased by him at all.
Nice to see the Rochdale lot who turned up at that point, and after the Skua had a good drink and flew off, we had a walk round and refound it feeding on the 8th fairway, presumably on leatherjackets and other larvae, we sat down and it gained our trust for a good 10 minutes before flying off.
We believe (as we were told later in the day) that it wasn't seen much for the rest of the morning but we copped for some magical moments from a fantastic bird!

ps. The Golf Club staff were very hospitable with birders, and they do an excellent cup of Columbian Coffee for 1.20, and please knock 2 hours off any image times as it was still in last week's Corfu time.



Attachments
__________________


Status: Offline
Posts: 163
Date:

Golf & Geese in Northumberland, 10/10/2017

The chance to see what was originally a Lesser Canada Goose, that is now called a Richardson`s Cackling Goose (confusing isnt it?) at Budle Bay, Northumberland presented itself on Monday night. Mark from York called me and we had a chat about the goose and a Long tailed Skua that was up that way on a golf course in Goswick. So along with Darren from Leeds and Ellis from York we agreed to meet up on the A59 near Knaresborough at 8-00am. We made good time along the A1 as we headed north, even the traffic around Newcastle wasnt bad.

On the journey up Ellis gave us the news that the Hooded Merganser that we had seen at Kilbirnie Loch in Ayrshire, Scotland last year had been accepted by the rarities committee, happy days! Our first call was at Goswick golf club were a Long tailed Skua (pale phase, juvenile) had taken up residence and was affording very close views (to say the least). As we parked on the car park it appeared that a big tournament was in progress, would this spoil our chances of seeing the bird? At this point a gentlemen approached us, he outlined that the golfers would not be using the part of the course until the early afternoon where the Skua was and that the bird was still present. We thanked him for the information and headed for the 8th tee. The bird was soon found and for about an hour was watched and photographed by us all. All of us remarked that we will never have such a close encounter with such an enigmatic seabird as this again. Mark made us laugh when the Skua was about a yard away that we could have a selfie with it. All in all quite a fascinating hour!

No news from Budle Bay, near Warren Mill about the Richardson`s Cackling Goose as yet, but as we arrived around 10 birders were searching through about 5000 Barnacle Geese for the bird. We moved along the coast to Lime Kiln Lane at the south of Budle Bay and within 10 minutes had found the goose. A Todd`s Canada Goose was also present but when a Pink footed Goose was stood behind the Richardson`s Cackling Goose the size comparison and structure clinched the identification. Nice bird to see and a good challenge. We stopped near Bamburgh Castle at Stag Rocks and saw Purple Sandpiper, Red throated Diver and lots of Eider.

A Red necked Phalarope along with a Barred Warbler had been found at Druridge Bay pools near Widdrington, sort of on the way home, got to be worth a call. At the entrance to the reserve a few birders were waiting for the warbler to put in an appearance, so we headed off to see the distant phalarope. Still a nice bird to watch as it gave the impression of a whirling dervish (if you dont know what one of those is, google it) Back at the entrance the Barred Warbler showed really well along with a Garden Warbler, to which I remarked borin and got a few strange looks (Sylvia borin, Latin name for Garden Warbler) Time was pressing on as we headed for home, the traffic around Newcastle/ Gateshead was pretty bad. Really good day out with one of the lads having two new birds on his list.

Dave Ousey.



__________________


Status: Offline
Posts: 580
Date:

Tuesday 1st August with David Morris

Following our Monday on Teeside, we pushed on to Northumberland to take the boat to Coquet Island. So 10am found us on the quayside at Amble in a state of keen anticipation. The trip was a total delight, we were lucky that the sea was calm and the sun even came out. Even though the majority of Puffins had dispersed there were still hundreds around, and we also saw some pristine juvenile Kittiwakes, adorable curious Seals and of course the Terns. As we headed in numerous Common and Sandwich Terns were bringing fish in, but I picked out 2 Roseate and a solitary Arctic adult. The havoc when we rounded the island at the Lighthouse end was amazing. With mostly fledged young squawking away and the corresponding parental dialogue it was massively loud and busy. The Roseate Terns were initially hard to pick out in the melee but eventually you could pick them up with a general paleness to the wings and upperparts and the dark bill. Of course some were in their little cubicles so that was easy at least. One thing that foxed me was that they largely didn't have long tail streamers; the Arctic Tern did. This is a bird I have wanted to see ever since I started birding so I was like a 6 year old on the way back into the harbour. What a magnificent experience!

We chatted to a couple of local birders and they told us about some Little Owls showing well nearby, so off we went, and were treated to some classic views of 3 young owls looking as furious as only owls can, perching on a wall and clashing with a Kestrel that seemed determined to cause trouble. Another new bird for David.

We were against the clock after the diversion to see the owls so had to be content with a quick look at Cresswell Ponds and then a departure. I ended up with a shortish list of 67 for the trip, but it was laced with quality and of course the unique experience of Coquet Island and what I think is one of my best lifers of all.

Thanks to Dave for driving and company.




__________________


Status: Offline
Posts: 1163
Date:

Yesterday, we were Exploring the area from Cresswell to Chevington reserve area. Highlights included Avocet, close encounters of meadow pipits, Jay, female blackcap, reed warbler, close encounters of house martins gathering mud, Marsh harrier and a little grebe, but the key bird was a grasshopper warbler that was reeling nearby, but was actually doing so in full view in the long grasses which was unexpected! Species total is now 89. Sadly all good things come to an end, but before we departed from Amble for the 1pm train, we hung around the harbour and was amused by an immature herring gull trying to swallow a flat fish. What an amazing 4 1/2 days! Key highlights overall was weds roseate tern lifer and Thursdays artic terns (one landed on my head), eider ducks, and the atmosphere of the day as a whole!). Ta!

__________________
Which bird is ideal for keeping cakes in? I asked. The answer: a Bun-tin. http://www.flickr.com/photos/135715507@N06


Status: Offline
Posts: 1163
Date:

Seahouses 9am- 7pm, excellent trip to enjoy the seabirds on the farne all day trip. (My 3rd lifetime visit overall) and I still love it. My species total since tuesday now stands at 80 (unless I've forgotten to write any down as I usually do) Highlights for today was 2 red breasted mergansers on the harbour, along with the locally tame eider ducks (which behave just like city park mallard ducks -and I almost had one on my lap!), great black backed gull, kittiwakes, the mobbing artic terns, fulmar (which I've finally managed to photograph on his feet), gannets passing on the boat, and of course the other usual seabirds with plenty of dramatic action, especially when a herring gull gets too close to the other birds.... ta!

__________________
Which bird is ideal for keeping cakes in? I asked. The answer: a Bun-tin. http://www.flickr.com/photos/135715507@N06


Status: Offline
Posts: 1163
Date:

An interesting last two days with fabulous brief close views of tree sparrows, linnets and eider ducks around Amble with the main highlight from yesterday morning with the roseate tern showing during a boat trip around coquet island, a long overdue lifer! It was difficult to spot them amongst the other terns whilst the boat was moving, which also ment any pictures were as tricky too but I managed a few record shots! I currently have 74 species over 2 days with a hope of increasing that today at Seahouses (the bus ride to there giving me a chance to write this post). Yesterday also produced spoonbill at druridge pools along with a black full summer plumaged ruff, black tailed godwit, wigeon and a male kestrel. Any pictures I take I won't be able to post on Flickr etc until at least 2 weeks from now. Ta!

__________________
Which bird is ideal for keeping cakes in? I asked. The answer: a Bun-tin. http://www.flickr.com/photos/135715507@N06


Status: Offline
Posts: 2127
Date:

Friday 31st March 2017

Grindon Lough

6 Golden Plover
5 Goldeneye
c100 Wigeon
c50 Greylag Geese
2 drake Shoveler

__________________

Mancunian Birder https://mancunianbirder.wordpress.com Visit my YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCtWoAs4geYL9An0l6w_XgIg



Status: Offline
Posts: 2127
Date:

Thursday 30th March 2017 drake Ferruginous Duck Silverlink Park also 10 Whooper Swans St Mary's Island on the sea

__________________

Mancunian Birder https://mancunianbirder.wordpress.com Visit my YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCtWoAs4geYL9An0l6w_XgIg



Status: Offline
Posts: 1148
Date:

Currently staying in Kielder Village, a few miles south of the Scottish border. Kielder Water is huge and the forest, in terms of size, is off the Richter Scale. Yesterday we did an eight mile walk up through the forest and on to Deadwater Fell at 1866 ft above sea level. Today, a five mile walk into Blakethin Reserve which is a mile or so south east of the village. Unfortunately, the hide overlooking Blakethin Reservoir has been pulled down. The new one in its place should be ready next month and looks like it will be good. Would have been a decent spot to both scope the reservoir (essentially the topmost part of Kielder Water) and scan the skyline for raptors. Most of the expected birds to be found in this type of habitat have been seen with nothing spectacular. This place is remote and snow is forecast in the early hours of tomorrow. We leave in the morning so I hope the roads stay clear.

Amongst others :- Dipper, Great spotted Woodpecker, Lesser Redpoll, Siskin, Kestrel, Buzzard, Raven, Coal Tit, Goldcrest & Goldeneye.



__________________
https://flickr.com/photos/44931335@N06


Status: Offline
Posts: 163
Date:

Northumberland & East Coast. 19/2/2017

With two of the A team needing to see the Pacific Diver that has been present at East Chevington, Northumberland for a while and with the promise of fine weather, we arranged to go. We met in Newhey at 6am, a time that our driver Steve K seemed unfamiliar with having had to miss his regular large breakfast. Myself, Bob K & Chris B made up the numbers. We made good progress using the satnav in Steve`s car, even allowing for some of its eccentricities, we reached the car park at Druridge Bay at 8-50am. We had a good look at Ladyburn pool first and could not find the diver, so we headed for its regular haunt, North pool. The weather was really nice and sunny, but not that warm. We soon found the Pacific Diver and all enjoyed its diving and preening in the sunshine, handshakes all around then. We called into one of the hides and had good views of a few Scaup and eventually saw the Slavonian Grebe, a bird that I have not seen for a few years.

After a slog over the sand dunes we found a flock of around a 100 Twite, Bob K went and got a few good pictures of them. We did a bit of sea watching and saw: - Guillemot, Razorbill, Red Breasted Merganser, Shag, Common Scoter & around ten Red Throated Divers, a few Sanderling, Ringed Plover also. After 40 minutes or so a single Skylark began singing and seven Shorelark flew onto the beach near the Twite, we really enjoyed watching them for the short time they were there. Some really nice birds at this reserve and lots of people out enjoying the weather.

We decided to go and have a look at the long staying Eastern Black Redstart at Skinningrove, Cleveland. We reached the area after a bit of my dodgy navigation (as I had been before) we got to the birds favoured area and apart from: - Rock Pipit, Stonechat, Robin & Wren, the bird was nowhere to be found. A few early returning Fulmar entertained us high up on the cliffs, but after 30 minutes most of us returned to the car for refreshments, apart from Bob K. After a long search of the area he had found the Eastern Black Redstart and it was now back in its normal place on the rocks, well done Bob. The bird performed very well for us all and lots of pictures were taken. On our way back to the car Chris B casually mentioned that he had not added Pine Bunting to his British list. Next stop it is then.

After a very long slog over the hills south of Whitby, which are very picturesque, also with lots of Sunday drivers, traffic problems etc our chances of seeing the Pine Bunting had gone. We did go to its daytime area at Dunnington, near York, but it was too late as all the birds had gone to roost. We headed for home after a really good days birding at around 7pm.

Dave O.



-- Edited by Ian McKerchar on Tuesday 21st of February 2017 09:46:56 PM

__________________


Status: Offline
Posts: 3172
Date:

Saturday 4th Feb with Simon Gough and Chris Chandler.

A 435 mile round trip to Goswick and then East Chevington taking in some fantastic wild coastline, then finishing off at North Shields for some Gull madness!

Goswick.
- Black Scoter 1 adult drake (Lifer)
The Common Scoters were quite distant viewed from the dunes just off the Golf Course, in range for scope views.
Target bird appeared in and out of the swell, and my first thought was that it looked like it had an orange cone stuck to its face so I knew it was the right bird, quite promenant tail too!
An unusual moment whilst watching the flock, suddenly the whole raft dived in situ.

Lots of other birds incl...
- c40 Long-tailed Duck incl corking drakes
- 6 Red-breasted Merganser
- c20 Red-throated Diver
- 1 Slavonian Grebe
- 1 Great Crested Grebe
- 2 Fulmar
- 4 Shag
- 1 Curlew
- 3 or 4 Auk's
- 3 Skykark
- 2 Meadow Pipit
- c20 Sanderling
- c75 Brent Geese


East Chevington NWT / Druridge Bay CP.
- 1 Pacific Diver (Lifer)
Bit distant at first and very active, it went out of view behind the reeds to the right of the hide then reappeared going out of view to the far left of the hide.


-confuse

Other birds...
- 3 Whooper Swans
- 3 Scaup (1m 2f) everyone thought only 2, I photographed 3
- 1 Pochard drake
- 10+ Little Grebe
- 1 Kingfisher




Attachments
__________________


Status: Offline
Posts: 1855
Date:

Went up to Druridge Bay Country Park today with John Barber and had fine views of the Pacific Diver. The bird was easily found at the eastern end of Ladybarn Lake, just a short walk from the visitor centre car park. The only downside of the day was the 8 hours plus in the car, (5 hours for the return journey) for the 400 mile trip, but what else should we have expected on a Friday? Thanks to John for driving.



__________________


Status: Offline
Posts: 770
Date:

Sat 21st Jan.

With Ian Lyth & Paul Greenall.

East Chevington NWT

Good views of the 1st winter Pacific Diver on the North Pool.
10 Scaup ... mainly adult drakes.

7 Shore Lark sticking close together on the beach.
40+ Twite .. these very close ... scoped the lot and not one with a ring ??


Goswick.

Dipped on the Black Scoter despite intense scanning of the masses of Common Scoter ( I'll be seeing these in my sleep) !

Plenty of birds to see here.

Long tailed duck incuding some superb drakes.
Red breasted merganser.
Red throated diver.
Slavonian grebe.
Razorbill.

Roger.


-- Edited by Roger Baker 3 on Sunday 22nd of January 2017 02:05:17 PM

-- Edited by Roger Baker 3 on Sunday 22nd of January 2017 02:10:32 PM

__________________
Blessed is the man who expecteth little reward ..... for he shall seldom be disappointed.


Status: Offline
Posts: 1273
Date:

I hope it does Mike, I'm over there tomorrow and this is a potential visit for us - just depends on what else is still around. Too many good birds over there at the moment, messing up our itinerary!!!

__________________
No one on their death bed ever said they wished they'd spent more time at work. http://bitsnbirds.blogspot.co.uk


Status: Offline
Posts: 975
Date:

A showy White's Thrush on Holy Island today; still present to at least 15.20 when we left.

Will it stay into tomorrow? Who knows?

Mike P.



__________________

Challenges are inevitable, but failure is optional.



Status: Offline
Posts: 1351
Date:

north of Dunstanburgh Castle large flocks of goldfinch, linnet, and pied wagtail as well as stonechat, wheatear, rock dove, teal, ringed plover, reed bunting, skylark, gannet, lesser and greater black backed gull, sandwich tern, shag , castle pools wigeon teal snipe curlew, mallard as well as on return rock pipits and four grey seals. Previous visit to Holy Island grey plover, red breasted merganser, on a quick scan of harbor, and brent geese further out,. Tawney owl near digs. And at seahouses a corker hot kipper bun



--



-- Edited by Ian Boote on Wednesday 28th of September 2016 12:30:26 AM

__________________


Status: Offline
Posts: 1351
Date:

Craster= 2 Mute Swans on the sea, 2 Teal, 2 Wigeon, Skylarks, Sandwich Terns, Greenfinch, Linnet, 6 Common Snipe, several Wheatear, Stonechat, House Sparrows, Pink Footed Geese, Siskin, Moorhen, White Wagtail, Flocks of Starling, Stonechat, Black Headed Gull Herring Gull, Chiffchaff, and hundreds of Meadow Pipit



__________________


Status: Offline
Posts: 1351
Date:

Curlew, 1 Knot, 5 Golden Plover, 3 Lapwing, several Common Tern, 6 Stonechat, Grey Heron, 4 Skylark, Coal Tit, Shag, Cormorant, Rook, Carrion Crow, Wren, Robin, Chaffinch, Goldfinch, Pied Wagtail, 2 Gannet, Greater Black Backed Gull, Swallow House Martin Dunnock,



__________________


Status: Offline
Posts: 1351
Date:

craster

Redshank, Oystercatcher, Turnstone, Rock Pipit, Gannets, Eider Ducks, House Martin,



__________________


Status: Offline
Posts: 2127
Date:

Demoiselle Crane in field 500 yards to the west of Grindon Lough viewable from gate on the minor road running along the south side of the lough - a very elusive bird that took 4 attempts and about 12 hours to see

Red-necked Phalarope still on the east side of Grindon Lough

__________________

Mancunian Birder https://mancunianbirder.wordpress.com Visit my YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCtWoAs4geYL9An0l6w_XgIg



Status: Offline
Posts: 823
Date:

Thursday 30th June - Saturday 2nd July

A trip to the Farne Islands via Carlisle and a few stops on the way.

RSPB Geltsdale: A good 2 hour walk, turning up a lot of the usual upland species such as Meadow Pipits, Stonechats, Lapwings, Curlews, Common Buzzards and Kestrels. A couple of Sedge Warblers were nice to see singing close to the visitor centre and Cuckoo calling.

Kielder Water: Distant views of a couple of Ospreys over the tree line. Otherwise, quiet, bar lots of Swallows and House Martins.

Grindon Lough: Stopped off for the Red-necked Phalarope, which was acting like a Dunlin on the shore line when I first picked it up. It soon flew to slightly deeper water and looked much better. Stunning little bird in fine condition.

Holy Island: Good numbers of Linnets and House Sparrows here. Reminded me of how things used to be. A Little Tern just off the harbour, with a very good looking breeding plumaged Bar-tailed Godwit along the shore. 2 Red-breasted Merganser flew past. Plenty of Eider ducks too.

Staple and Inner Farne: These held all that you would expect. Lots of Guillemots, several Bridled Guillemots, Razorbills, Kittiwakes, Puffins, Shags, a few Fulmar. A Rock Pipit seen at Staple. Arctic Terns galore on Inner Farne with several pairs of both Common and Sandwich too.

Coquet Island: Mostly Arctic and Common Terns seen here, with around 6 Roseaste Terns. Great looking birds, and a first for me. Sandwich Terns were also in good numbers , with Puffins all around too.
A great few days.

__________________
My blog: The Early Birder


Status: Offline
Posts: 1148
Date:

A superb early afternoon sail to and around Coquet Island. In total contrast to last year's opening of the heavens and heavy swell making birdwatching extremely difficult indeed, today's weather was lovely. Warm and sunny, relatively calm with the sea being pretty much like a mill pond. The star bird here, of course, is the Roseate Tern. With the excellent conditions, I was able to pick out a minimum of six birds and with other birders seeing a few as well, there were probably a dozen or so seen. There was a nice bonus, approaching the island, of a dark phase Arctic Skua which gave everyone decent views for a few minutes. Amongst others :-

Roseate Tern (6-12)
Common Tern
Arctic Tern
Sandwich Tern
Arctic Skua (1)
Guillemot
Razorbill (2)
Puffin
Knot (2)
Oystercatcher
Eider
Fulmar
Kittiwake

A great birding spectacle and well worth the 8 fee with Dave Gray's Puffin Cruises from the harbour at Amble.

__________________
https://flickr.com/photos/44931335@N06


Status: Offline
Posts: 226
Date:

Ah ok. Well I hope she gets better soon.

__________________


Status: Offline
Posts: 1148
Date:

The five miles walk, on Saturday morning, to St Mary's Lighthouse and back added Sand Martin, Whitethroat, Arctic Tern, Fulmar & Ringed Plover.

Today, one hour boat trip to Coquet Island in heavy rain and choppy seas, amongst others :-

Common Tern
Arctic Tern
Roseate Tern (c.4)
Puffin ('000s)
Guillemot (c.100)
Razorbill (2)
Eider (c.75)
Fulmar
Gannet
Kittiwake

The swell and the rain made bird watching difficult but it was worth it for the brief look at the Roseate Terns.




__________________
https://flickr.com/photos/44931335@N06


Status: Offline
Posts: 282
Date:

Hi Joel I have not reported it has my wife had a very heavy fall on this day injuring her head and arm badly so I have had more serious things to worry about

__________________
b. hooley


Status: Offline
Posts: 226
Date:

Have you reported it? If it was a spanish sparrow it is very rare.

__________________


Status: Offline
Posts: 282
Date:

Hi Joel
it was a definite Italian sparrow Ihave a photograph of the bird showing very white cheeks and very pale breast I saw this at Budle Bay Isaw one last year in Norfolk



__________________
b. hooley


Status: Offline
Posts: 226
Date:

bernard hooley wrote:

My wife and I have just spent a week in Northumberland based in Seahouses We covered the coast from Berwick to Boulmer including the Farne islands I saw ninety one birds altogether of which twenty four were new for this year

stonechat
Italian sparrow
osprey





Are you sure it was a italian sparrow? They are very rare and I don't remember one being reported around that time. Could it have been tree sparrow? Hopefully it was a italian sparrow biggrin

__________________


Status: Offline
Posts: 1148
Date:

Two nights in Whitley Bay, up for the Rugby League Magic Weekend. Forty five minute walk on the beach late afternoon produced Swallow, House Martin, Swift, Rock Pipit, Oystercatcher, Pied Wagtail, Sandwich Tern, Kittiwake, Gannet, Jackdaw & Herring Gull.

Booked on with Dave Gray's Cruises for trip out to Coquet Island on Sunday, unfortunately weather forecasting heavy rain. Will report back in due course.

-- Edited by Mark Jarrett on Friday 29th of May 2015 10:36:23 PM

__________________
https://flickr.com/photos/44931335@N06


Status: Offline
Posts: 282
Date:

My wife and I have just spent a week in Northumberland based in Seahouses We covered the coast from Berwick to Boulmer including the Farne islands I saw ninety one birds altogether of which twenty four were new for this year
eider
red breasted merganser
arctic tern
shag
sandwich tern
rock pipit
corn bunting
little tern
kittiwake
guillemot
bridled guillemot
puffin
sanderling
tree pipit
wood warbler
grasshopper warbler
fulmar
grey plover
stonechat
Italian sparrow
osprey
linnet
rock dove
bar tailed godwit

__________________
b. hooley


Status: Offline
Posts: 139
Date:

Spent last week there (31st May - 7th June) staying at Beadnell, in a cottage yards from the beach and harbour.

I've been visiting this area for many years now, so I'm quite familiar with it. The birding is superb all year round.

As this was a family holiday my birding escapades were restricted to early mornings before the missus and kids arose from their slumber. At the far end of our beach was the Long Nanny, well known for its Little tern breeding colony, looked after by the National Trust. This year I was told there were 22 pairs nesting. However, the numbers of Arctic terns here were in their hundreds. Little gull and White-winged black tern were recent visitors, and there was also a Whimbrel present on one of my visits. From this stretch of beach there is a constant stream of terns (Common, Arctic, Sandwich, Little) feeding but also commuting between the Long Nanny and their preferred feeding area out at the Farnes.

Halfway along the bay there is a flash, which had recently hosted a Lesser yellowlegs, although it was fairly quiet on my visits there with Shelduck, Shoveller, Mallard and Herring gull on view. The surrounding dunes held Reed buntings and Meadow pipits, and a local caravan park attracted the more common warblers and woodland species.

Out at sea, with the proximity of the Farnes, there was constant seabird activity, with Kittiwakes, Fulmars, Guillemots and various gull species as well as the terns contiuously flying past. I also spotted a group of Common scoters and on one occasion, around 60 Gannets flew close by. Although I didn't positively id any Puffins during the week, I know they were out there somewhere, as they tend to stay further out nearer the Farnes. Having visited them several times now, this year I opted to stay on the mainland.

Further along the coast, there is a small village, Low Newton-by-the-sea, which has a small reserve with a hide. With its east coast location, this place is a little birding gold mine, and if you are here early enough, you have the whole place to yourself. A Collared flycatcher was found here last year by a local birder. At the scrapes here, I was lucky enough to find a Spoonbill (kindly reported on RBA for me by Phil Owen). biggrin

All in all, a very nice week.

Cheers,

Steve.


-- Edited by Stephen Fuentes on Thursday 12th of June 2014 02:31:36 PM

__________________


Status: Offline
Posts: 1163
Date:

Seahouses is a fantastic area for birds. The Farne islands as many will know is great for getting really close to the seabirds and getting attacked by artic terns (don't forget your hat and to respect their nesting activity). but how many know about the wild eider ducks in the harbour that will take bread and chips from your hands and the wild kestrel that shows no fear of people when hunting? Or even the house martins collecting mud within 6ft from me. These are just a few highlights from My visit from 2nd to 6th June which was amazing both on and of the islands in this respect.

__________________
Which bird is ideal for keeping cakes in? I asked. The answer: a Bun-tin. http://www.flickr.com/photos/135715507@N06


Status: Offline
Posts: 838
Date:

Friday 21st June 2013.

Myself and Stephen Fuentes headed up to Amble for a visit to Coquet Island with Dave Gray's Cruises.

On arrival at Amble before boarding the boat, we saw a few pairs of Eider in the harbour and some Sandwich Terns were feeding closeby.

At 1pm we headed off on the short boat crossing to the island and en-route saw several Guillemots, Gannets, Razorbill, Fulmar, Kittiwakes and literally hundreds of Puffins on the sea (a real spectacle!) some of which were very close to the boat.

The boat stopped 50 metres or so offshore and we were treated to great views of the Roseate Tern colony and also Arctic, Common and Sandwich Terns. 2 Roseate Terns in particular showed really well on the sand away from the nest-boxes showing their familiar rosy-tinted underparts. Also a Rock Pipit fed on the shore.

A great day out and well worth the long journey up North! biggrin

__________________


Status: Offline
Posts: 126
Date:

4 days last week 4-8 March at Lindisfarne, Stag Rocks (Bamburgh), Seahouses and Beadnell and Embleton Bays. Highlights - many Eider, Common Scoter, and Red throated Divers at all locations, 22 Purple Sandpipers Stag Rocks, also at Embelton Bay; Long tailed Ducks, small groups at Stag Rocks and Embleton Bay and a pair in Seahouses Harbour; Brent Geese (light Bellied) at Lindisfarne and Budle Bay; Slavonian Grebes 1 Stag Rocks and 4 Ross Point; Black throated Diver 1 Stag Rocks; also Fulmars at various nest sites, Razorbills, Guillemots and Shags; Merlin Stag Rocks. Waders included many Bar Tailed Godwits, Grey Plovers and Sanderlings. Other ducks on the sea were Mergansers, Goldeneye and Wigeon all in good numbers. A Snow Bunting at Ross sands and many Rock Pipits at various locations along the sea.

__________________


Status: Offline
Posts: 67
Date:

Our trip at the end of May went well. The trip to the Farnes was very successful with all members of the group undergoing the sharp beaks of the Arctic Terns, and returning with white streaks on hats and jackets. We had a Bonxie close to the boat on the way out, Turnstones, Whitethroat and Spotted Flycatcher on Staple, and Ringed Plover and another Spotted Flycatcher on Inner Farne. Among the thousands and thousands of breeding seabirds.

We also did the Coquet Island trip, it was fairly rough so we didn't do the circumnavigation of the island. Dave Gray held the boat just off the landing jetty and we were able to study the terns and pick out Roseates. Also saw Dunlin and Purple Sandpiper on the tiny beaches and rock ledges. 8 per head, and my group (9 of us that day), pre-booked, had the boat to ourselves. He did another trip immediately after we arrived back in Amble.

We also did Druridge Bay. East Chevington, Hauxley and Cresswell Ponds, amongst others. We saw Tree Sparrows at Druridge, Marsh Harrier and Spoonbill at East Chevington, Little Stint and Wood Sandpiper at Hauxley and Stonechat at Cresswell. Again among the many"standard" birds which you would expect.

Thanks to Sid and Nick for their help. Its a great place to bird, and the Farne Islands trip was another of my birding ambitions realised.

-- Edited by richard howells 2 on Thursday 28th of June 2012 10:32:57 AM

__________________


Status: Offline
Posts: 459
Date:

Travelled up the east coast today so went to look for the Marsh Warbler just south of Hauxley - variety of its song was great to hear - I picked up sparrow, sedge and reed warbler variations but apparently it does some sand grouse as well! Showed in flight for an hour then sang from a sycamore bush for ten minutes with superb views. Also Grasshopper Warbler nearby.

__________________
Building my lifers


Status: Offline
Posts: 67
Date:

Went through the Tourist info Centre for Coquet, and they gave me Dave Gray's number. Quick phone call booked my mob in - iirc they an hour 10 per adult. We're going at the end of May (29th) but won't be back until mid-June to report (going on to Benbecula & Lewis). Its gonna be a seabird summer!

__________________


Status: Offline
Posts: 679
Date:

Many thanks for the info Sid. I'm up there for a week in June so i'll check Amble for the David Gray trips. I'll let you know how i get on.

Thanks again, Dean.

__________________
1 2  >  Last»  | Page of 2  sorted by
Quick Reply

Please log in to post quick replies.

RODIS

 

This forum is dedicated to the memory of Eva Janice McKerchar.