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Post Info TOPIC: NEW BIRD BOOKS


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RE: NEW BIRD BOOKS


I managed to get a first edition copy of "Wild America" from Abebooks for about a fiver - well worth it.


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Nev Wright wrote:

Anyone know when the new Collins Guide is out??






Showing as available to pre-order on Amazon, Waterstones, Play etc. Different sites have different publication dates though.

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WILD AMERICA The Record of a 30,00-Mile Journey around the Continent by Roger Tory Peterson and James Fisher

Superb read, well worth tracking down.

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It has taken some getting but finally got Life List by Olivia Gentile, the biography of Phoebe Snetsinger, excellent read and the author has even read Birders by Mark Cocker, which is a must for all birders.

Not quite birds these ones but Dave Winnard mentioned them on his furry and flowery website, The new Collins complete guide to flowers and then Butterflies, same format as the bird one, nice books.


Also helped someone sell some old New Naturalist a few weeks ago they netted a couple of hundred quid, you never know what on your shelves.

keep birding.



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Birds of North America. Not been over there and not intending a visit in the near future, but the birds of North America have always interested me, particularly as I tend to come across one or two species each year from the other side of the pond.yawn.gif

This year I bought the main three field guides for the region, Sibleys The North American Field Guide, the Smithsonian Field Guide to the Birds of North America and the new Peterson Field Guide to Bords of North America. Yes you may think me mad, but I managed to find them all online for bargain prices, so was worth it.confuse.gif

Peterson's is a very well revised book, with some updated plates and new distribution maps. The plates however, are still similar to earlier additions and do not represent as many plumages for all species that more modern styled guides now have. Peterson's does however have wonderfully updated distribution atlas's, which are much more up to date than the other two, taking into account issues up to the last few years. These are found in the rear of the book and are larger and more clear than those found in most feield guides. It is overall an excellent book and this latest edition is an improvement from previous ones.smile.gif

Sibley's book has been at the top of the tree since it was first published in 2000, an excellent read and brought about new structures for field guides, which I think have been used by others since, making it very easy to use. What is lacks in text can be seen in the many different pictures of each species, which allows readers the chance to pick out distinguishing features more easily than other guides. The book must be due an update at some point, although the seperate East and West have been published since and probably offer better use for field visits, as it is quite a large book. If you are looking to clinch a North American species and want to know the ones it could be, this book is certainly worth getting hold of, although if a new edition is due it may be worth holding back for. Still the best field guide for North America in my view.biggrin.gif

Finally, if photographs are your thing then this little gem of a book is worth getting hold of. It obviously has the constraints that all photo-guides have, with differences in light and not all species showing different sexes, plumages etc, but this is to be expected. It does, however, give you a chance to familiarise yourself with how many of the birds of North America actually look if you were to see them in the field, a little ruffled or just perched on a wall etc etc. Foe the money you get some good background information on North America, its birds and the birsd to be found in each habitat, which is more than other guides. Like Sibley's it gives you a little intro to each group of similar groups/families/genus etc, which is useful to the beginer. But it's value comes from the addition of a CD with bird song for most of the species in North America, which would prove invaluable for a visit, an may prove very valuable for me if I come across a new species from over there on my local patch and it decides to call, I have them all on my ipod now!?wink.gif

Anyway, could go on and on, but if you are going over there I'm sure you would want one of these, and even if you are not going over there it never harms to have an armchair/toilet book with some exciting birds which you can dream of finding one day!?



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Not a new book, but I bought a copy of Feathers - Identification for Bird Conservation last week (by Marian Cieslak & Boleslow Dul, 2006)smile.gif. I am currently doing some survey work around a proposed wind farm in Mid Wales and this book has proved invaluable in identifying feathers, especially Goshawk feathers from other similar looking ones. It takes you up a level from the Helm book 'Tracks and Signs of Britain & Europes Birds', which lacks certain species and is not as detailed for each.

Not seen a Goshawk on the site yet though, was hoping to get them displaying during surveys over April, but don't seem to be using the particular forest patch they used through the wintercry.gif.

Have had some cracking views of others birsd there though including early hirundines, Redstart, Ravens a plenty and breeding Curlew. Am awaiting the influx of other Welsh specialities such as Pied FLycatcher and Wood Warblers, bring on May!?biggrin.gif

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I did apologise for the cock up not certain what I did wrong, sorry Tim!

Keep Birding

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Tim,

apologies for re-posting and deleting your two most recent posts but Paul's had somehow cocked the thread up and it was necessary to put it on track again

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Ian McKerchar (forum administrator and owner)


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On the 23rd Feb 2009 Tim Wilcox posted:

Not a new bird book but not a truly old one either - hardback copies of 'Atlas of the Breeding Birds of Lancashire and North Merseyside' have been reduced to 8 at Martin Mere. Nice buy. Obviously it will be superseded in a few years but still very interesting especially on the subject of the origins of our 'dodgy'' ducks and geese. MM and other 'zoos' as it calls them are responsible for all the Barnacles, most of the Greylags, Mandarins and Gadwall in their region and presumably here too.



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Ian McKerchar (forum administrator and owner)


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On the 24th April 2009 Tim Wilcox posted:

For anyone interested Reaktion Books www.reaktionbooks.co.uk have an offer on their highly praised Animal series of animal monographs which includes Crow, Duck, Swan, Falcon, Peacock, Parrot and Penguin with Pigeon and Owl to come in the autumn. If you buy 3 titles you get 20% off (about 10% by the time you've paid postage) and a free Penguin (or Shark) T-shirt. Offer ends April 30th. Owl, due Oct 2009 is by Desmond Morris.


Tim Wilcox





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Ian McKerchar (forum administrator and owner)


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Not a new bird book but not a truly old one either - hardback copies of 'Atlas of the Breeding Birds of Lancashire and North Merseyside' have been reduced to 8 at Martin Mere. Nice buy. Obviously it will be superseded in a few years but still very interesting especially on the subject of the origins of our 'dodgy'' ducks and geese. MM and other 'zoos' as it calls them are responsible for all the Barnacles, most of the Greylags, Mandarins and Gadwall in their region and presumably here too.

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Not exactly new, but Borders in Stockport are selling 'Bird-The Definitive Visual Guide' at the moment for 12.99. (rrp 30)
Hard back with over 1000 stunningly beautiful photographs it's definately worth looking at.

Link to a version of the book on amazon...

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Bird-Definitive-Visual-Birdlife-International/dp/1405306335/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1234937817&sr=1-3

Anthony


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I really have only just got the book and as I'm currently on shift at work and off birding well out of county straight from work tomorrow for 4 days, i havent had the pleasure of grilling it yet and I won't get the chance soon either. But, I don't buy many bird books, don't need 'em as I'd much rather get out birding instead but this one was a must buy, an essential purchase for me even though I didn't know or care who the artists were, Mark Brasil's credentials are well proven already and I have to say that I was most impressed by the list of artists involved with the plates, all top class. The species coverage, text and details looks superb and a recent review by Bryan Bland in Birding World unreservedly sang it's praises and that's a much more authorative recommendation than I could ever manage.

I'll probably only buy one bird book this year and this is it, and all I'll ever need

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Ian McKerchar (forum administrator and owner)


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Ian McKerchar wrote:

Field guide to the birds of East Asia by Mark Brazil- nuff said...wink.gif






Ian,

Seeing as you are the first person i know to own this new guide maybe you could give a brief review. I looked at it yesterday on Amazon and will probably be a good addition to my increasing library.

cheers
jason

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Blog : A Tale of 2 Halves


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Field guide to the birds of East Asia by Mark Brazil- nuff said...

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Ian McKerchar (forum administrator and owner)


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Am reading Crow Country by Mark Cocker (from Bolton Central Library) -- I think it came out last year. Very enjoyable.

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Judith Smith __________________________________ Lightshaw hall Flash is sacrosanct - NO paths please!


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Dean Macdonald wrote:


My wife bought me "Bearded Tit" by Rory McGrath last week.
What a great read it was. I've always liked him. Don't be put off if you don't.
It really is a good book. Reads like an autobiographical novel. The bird watching references are similar to Simon Barnes' but funnier. It's full of suprises, which i can't tell you about without spoiling it. Let's just say it's "moving". It usually takes me a few weeks to read a book but this one took 4 daysbiggrin.gif Couldn't put down. Then Joanne read it all today! and was "moved" to tears.
Stick it on your Fathers day list. It's probably in the bargain section by now.

Dean.






Just to add to Dean's comments having finished it last week. It's wise, instructive, well-written and very funny indeed. There is also some very good observational writing on birds. Much more than the average witty Christmas read.

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Nev Wright wrote:

Anyone know when the new Collins Guide is out??






The 2nd Edition of the Birds of Britain & Ireland is out in March, make sure you dont confuse it with the UK & Europe guide.

cheers
jason

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Blog : A Tale of 2 Halves


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Thanks Paul and sorry for late reply. Think I'll leave the exhausting World listers alone for a bit! I'm now on Rory McGrath's 'Bearded Tit' for pure light entertainment.

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Anyone know when the new Collins Guide is out??

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Glad you enjoyed it Tim, if you are still stuck indoors, try DAN KOEPPEL books To see every bird on earth, the price per bird article, make you just want to stay in GM, hows the window list?

keep birding.

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Just read 'Birding on Borrowed Time'. What a good recommendation Paul - perfect for the housebound invalid to travel with the mind. Must admit I'd never heard of most of the birds she mentions but it's funny to suddenly find her describing 'getting to grips with the difference between a Song Thrush and a Mistle Thrush' amidst all the Antpittas and Ground-Cuckoos. It all rolls by at a breathless pace and she must have been exhausting in real life. She must also hold the World Record for the largest personal carbon-footprint! In an odd way its a document of a pre-global warming approach to the World and its wildlife.

In trying to find her actual list online (without success) I discovered that there is a biography of Phoebe Snetsinger coming out at the end of March this year called 'Life List: A Woman's Quest for the World's Most Amazing Birds' by Olivia Gentile.

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The post lady just delivered my new shrink-wrapped Snetsinger and also a copy of The Lapwing from the nice efficient people at Birding World. Postage was free too. I'd recommend them. Sent me a free sample of the journal too.

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Paul - Have you checked out the manchester A2 Z yet for Talbot Road entriesbiggrin.gifbiggrin.gif

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Jason. many thanks, in my quest to collect all the old bird reports and books covering manchester, the new books have slipped me by.

This one looks like a cracker, have ordered it alreadybiggrin.gif

keep birding

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Looks like this will make interesting reading.

Rare Birds Where and When

cheers
jason

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Blog : A Tale of 2 Halves


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Also 19.95 with free delivery from Amazon and its new.

cheers
jason

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Blog : A Tale of 2 Halves


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Paul Heaton wrote:

Sean a small review in Frontiers in Birding was done on the Old Book thread,
as for 45 for Snetsingers, I have seen that a number of times and its tosh still in print, try birding world they normally have it for 17.

keep birding






Paul

Duly ordered from Birding World for 17.50. That's more like itsmile.gif If I want the Bill Oddie there are booksellers giving it away for 1p plus postageconfuse.gif

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Sean a small review in Frontiers in Birding was done on the Old Book thread,
as for 45 for Snetsingers, I have seen that a number of times and its tosh still in print, try birding world they normally have it for 17.

keep birding

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Many thanks for further ideas. The Snetsinger is out of print and seems to be over 45 second hand. I will keep a look out for a cheaper copy. I have read reviews of 'Frontiers in Birding'. Has it been republished now? I believe the print quality and binding were rubbish. I do also have acres of articles in the copies of British Birds Ian kindly lent me to go at.

I will post separately for help with birding from the windows of a terraced house!

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Moving along to a totally different book, if you like a bit of everything from birding advice, sites and detailed species studies on hard to split birds then get hold of "Frontiers in Birding", Martin Garner & Friends (ie Ian Wallace, Rob Hume and other big fells in the british bird scene).

It is a great read and one you don't have to read in chapter order or cover to cover, as you will always have preferred topics. It has interesting articles on visible migration, island birdwatching and getting the most from your local patch, not to mention splitting black from common scoter, american moorhen, taiga merlin etc etc.

If you are after something a little different from the usual then it's well worth a read. smile.gif

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Yeah Phoebe Snetsinger was the lady who broke a world record, for seeing alot of birds in the world. As to the end of the book, now that would spoil it for you Tim.

read and enjoy.

Oh and try a window list whilst you are off.

Keep birding.

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Paul Heaton wrote:

Tim, heavy duty stuff the History of Ornithology, be careful of that arm.
how about,
The Big Bird Race Bill Oddie Dave Thomlinson
Birding on Borrowed time Phoebe Snetsinger.

stay well get out there soon.






many thanks again Paul. Was Phoebe Snetsinger the lady who tried to see all the birds in the world before she died which ended up being at the hands of bandits somewhere in Africa or was that someone else or have I got that mixed up?

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Tim, heavy duty stuff the History of Ornithology, be careful of that arm.
how about,
The Big Bird Race Bill Oddie Dave Thomlinson
Birding on Borrowed time Phoebe Snetsinger.

stay well get out there soon.

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Thanks Paul Yes I read Stephen Moss's 'A Bird in the Bush' when it came out and very good it is too. His small column in the Guardian is always a pleasure and I have the collected Guardian pieces on order along with Rory McGrath's 'Bearded Tit' which was recommended here. Ready to go next is Peter Bircham's 'History of Ornithology' in the o so beautiful New Naturalist series and I read somewhere that that new book Corvus is highly rated too.

Any other recommendations from anyone much appreciated - preferably books I can easily read in bed and that aren't too heavy as my broken arm gets a bit uncomfortable. So e.g. my Birds Britannica is on on hold for now!

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HI Tim sorry to hear about you been out of action, hope you get back on the wheels soon.

As for Stephen Moss try A bird in the Bush the history of birdwatching.

take it easy.

keep birding.

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Unable to birdwatch at the moment gives me time to catch up on reading. Just finished 'A Sky Full of Starlings' by Stephen Moss kindly given to me by a work colleague. It's a very readable diary of county birding in Somerset in 2007 and is full of moments of recognition. Highly recommended.

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It's being serialised at 0945hrs on Radio 4 this week.

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Judith Smith __________________________________ Lightshaw hall Flash is sacrosanct - NO paths please!


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My wife bought me "Bearded Tit" by Rory McGrath last week.
What a great read it was. I've always liked him. Don't be put off if you don't.
It really is a good book. Reads like an autobiographical novel. The bird watching references are similar to Simon Barnes' but funnier. It's full of suprises, which i can't tell you about without spoiling it. Let's just say it's "moving". It usually takes me a few weeks to read a book but this one took 4 daysbiggrin.gif Couldn't put down. Then Joanne read it all today! and was "moved" to tears.
Stick it on your Fathers day list. It's probably in the bargain section by now.

Dean.


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