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Post Info TOPIC: Norfolk


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Spent the weekend at my Mum's (Lowestoft, Suffolk) & managed to take her out in car twice- once around Hickling/Horsey, once at Normaston Park Lowestoft & the easterly point SO really pleased with what we did manage to see= 39 biggrin.gif
Pochard
great crested grebe
mute swan
red legged partridge
pinkfooted geese- several thousand biggrin.gif (nice to see them not just winging it away!)
rook
carrion crow
jackdaw
pheasant
woodpigeon
black headed gulls
egyptian geese
barn owls x3 (one really close biggrin.gif)
lapwing
kestrel
marsh harrier biggrin.gif
Fieldfare smile.gif
chaffinch
great tit
blue tit
robin
purple sandpipers x7 biggrin.gif(Easterly point, Lowestoft)
tufted duck
mallard
coot
moorhen
pied wagtail
herring gull
common gull
shovellersmile.gif
wigeon smile.gif
greater black backed
cormorant
blackbird
goldfinch
magpie
house sparrow
pied wagtail
starling

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Originally posted by Richard Howells, 8th December 2009

Had three days down in East Anglia (mainly Norfolk) this last weekend. Started with the pair of Cranes at Eldernell nr Peterborough on Sunday, then the American Wigeon at Welney, but dipped on the Great White Egret at Lakenheath. Monday saw 6 species of geese on Buckenham/Cantley Marshes, 37 Bean, 80 White-front, Canadas, Barnacles, Greylag and Egyptian. On to Horsey and another pair of cranes and 500+ Pink-feet. Then on to Stubb Mill in the gathering gloom, where two Crane threesomes came in. And finally an hour at Lakenheath on the way home today where this time the egret appeared. You're right about the Marsh Harriers, Gary, I recorded some 15 across the various sites visited. I'm thinking of moving down there permanently!



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Originally posted by Gary Mills, 7th December 2009

Just got back from a week in Norfolk where we stayed at a cottage in Titchwell. Managed to get some birding in during the week including waders at Snettisham and roosting Marsh and Hen Harriers at Titchwell. It amazes me how common place wintering Marsh Harriers are compared to a few years ago. The highlight of the week had to be 3 Barn Owls hunting together in fields between Burnham Norton and Burnham Overy Staithe. We had some excellent views as the birds were hunting close to the road oblivious to our presence.







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Ian McKerchar (forum administrator and owner)


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Ladybirds bites are in fact rather uncommon. Unfortunately, in line with other invasions to the UK of varying degrees in years gone by ( I vividly remember the huge invasion of 1976), the recent episode in North Norfolk (which I witnessed the very beginning of only) saw their food stocks depleted quickly and their taking lumps out of you was merely an attempt to find anything edible in order to survive. Not that it helped your predicament I'm afraid



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Ian McKerchar (forum administrator and owner)


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Sue, you will remember that twitch forever, what a bird as well, sounds like a well deserved tick.

Looking forward to the full tale at the next 200 club meeting, where I am sure Mr Warfy will buy you a pint.

keep birding

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Got back on Thursday from a few days away with my kids and Paul. Was very cruel and dragged them to Weybourne on Monday morning for the great spotted cuckoo. Going to blame Warfy as he text us to say it was still there.

Was a long walk to the beach from Kelling, kids complained. They complained even more about the thousands of ladybirds and hover flies on the beach. Does everyone know that ladybirds bite? And yes, it does hurt. It was baking hot and you had to put on a jacket to stop being bitten on the arms. This goes down as the most unpleasant, horrible twitch I've been on.

It was a long hour and 20 minutes before the cuckoo gave a brief flight that Paul saw and I couldn't get on. To say I was in a foul mood by then is an understatement. Another 15 minutes before the cuckoo decided to perch where it could be seen, distantly. Then took at least 5 minutes before Toni saw it.

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Nice to see you and Warfy,too, Mel. I know what you mean about that trekredface.gif 2 of our party didn't make it all the way. You can probably blame the RSPB. Their restoration of the fen has obviously contributed to the undermining of a lot of the trees in the nearer plantations. I hope they're getting the balance right. That personal gripe aside, it was worth it for the views,especially if you found that sweet spot where you could see between the overlapping branches straight onto the bird.

We had a pretty good trip. Dipped on the 'extras' (Heron, Pratincole, Rosefinch) and only brief, distant views of Woodlark & Honey Buzzard, but cracking views of Dartford Warblers at Dunwich made up for that. A lifer for 2 of our group and a confirmation sighting for a third, a mere 50 years on!

The usual Norfolk suspects (Garganey, Stone Curlew etc) all present & correct, with great views of Nightingale & Nightjar and stunning views of the Minsmere Hobbys, especially the 1 taking a dragonfly about 6ft from the windows of Bittern Hide. Good weather, good company, good birding.

The one sour note was the failure of Travelodge to keep their end of the bargin to provide pre-booked and paid-for rooms at a specified hotel. We got 'relocated' to Norwich Central for our 1st night - NCP parking (refunded), later breakfasts, noisy etc- and it was obvious from the resignation & embarrassment of the reception staff that Tl's practice of overbooking in the hope that some customers won't turn up is a regular practice if not a matter of policyfurious.gif. Note to potential users-caveat emptor (let the buyer beware) and check in early!

-- Edited by Mike Chorley on Thursday 4th of June 2009 11:52:29 PM

-- Edited by Mike Chorley on Thursday 4th of June 2009 11:52:58 PM

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Had a great couple of days in beautiful,bloody-hot!! Norfolk with Warfy.....

First thing in the morning without any trouble at Little Paxton GP we saw two singing Nightingales,the latter was showing wonderfully and a lifer for me as was the five or so Turtle Doves we also saw there. Great place,the dawn chorus was fabulous.

Then we moved on to Wicken Fen,after a short walk and seeing Cuckoo's and plenty were calling. We arrived at the hide,the setting was idillyc,calm water,stunning clear skies,Redshank with young and other waterbirds,all mooching in the mud and grass and as clear as day we saw the Squacco Heron. He was sat very close to the hide and his plumage was amazing,especially his head feathers,very impressed by this bird,we also were lucky to see him fly l never imagined he'd be so white!!

Our next stop was Lakenheath.......o m gosh,what felt like a never ending hike in the blazing heat we trekked to see the the Golden Orioles. Despite having water with us,it was a terrible long walk one that l 'might've' mentioned to Warfy once, twice or ten timeswink.gif but well worth it once we got there. Many others that were there before us were still trying to find the location of the bird but l had a secret weapon in the shape of......Warfy...it was in the scope n minutes wink.gifThe song of this bird sends you way,way into the tropical rainforest. l loved it,it's nest was hanging in the cool of the shaded branches and you could see a parent bird clearly on the nest...it simply was one of the most stunning birds l've ever seen. Great to see the ever-happy and smiley Mr Chorley and gang there.
Also seen were at least ten or more Hobbies,me being a lover of Raptors l wasn't unhappy with the views biggrin.gif

Next a short trip to Weeeting Heath,the view from the hide to see these birds was a huge plain field littered with rabbits and young and heat haze to hamper our view but we got it albiet briefly, finally off to Dersingham Bog for Nightjars(L), I was assured this was 'the' site to see this species.

l never knew what to expect but never expected what we saw!!

Not long after we'd gotten there, locals advised us to watch from the hillside but Simon insisted to me the view from there would be hampered and we walked along the boardwalk. After a brief run through of what might happen, a bird was flying above Simon's head, and after that it was non stop action. Two were seen on the telegraph poles also one perched in a tree, three seen chasing each other and all the time we were surrounded by the familiar 'churring' and wing claps. These birds were quite 'ghostly', gliding up to us, completely silently and disappearing in a heartbeat,l truely felt honoured to have witnessed that evenings spectacle, it was an experience to me like no other and one l'd love to see again biggrin.gif

We also saw several 'roding' Woodcock and a soliatary Muntjac whilst we were there and lots and LOTS of midges!!!

Never caught up with the Black winged Pranticole or Honey Buzzards but we were lucky enough to see a fine male Montagu's Harrier (my 7th lifer of the trip).biggrin.gif

-- Edited by Melanie Beckford on Wednesday 3rd of June 2009 05:52:42 PM

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A must!!! It,s heaven on earth.

May I recommend Guardian spirit of the East bank, by Moss Talyor
A celebration of R A Richardson, reading that at Cley is a perfect day!

keep birding

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great report Sean we had our first visit last year and your right it is a great place and a must for all birdersbiggrin.gif

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Sean,nice to see you at minsmere,we got back tuesday night,the trip report is currently at the printer,s don,t hold your breathwink.gif,but we had a good time.

cheers geoffbiggrin.gif

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Cheers Ian, was over Elton a few weeks back, am a fan, just don't get much Manchester birding done at present apart from surveys.

I almost forgot to mention that you can never go anywhere without bumping into a few Manchester Forum folk. Was nice to see Geoff and his crew briefly at Minsmere. I take it they are still down there this week, as no blog on the forum yet. I expect it will have some of the birds that eluded me this time, look forward to reading theirtrip report to Suffolk/Norfolk!?

Keep birding. biggrin.gif

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Loved the report, but have you tried Elton?biggrin.gifbiggrin.gifbiggrin.gifcry.gif
Cheers Ian
when it Rocks it's very, very good

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Had a few days off last week and made a long weeekend of it down to Norfolk with an old birding friend of mine from Chester. Was staying on the North Coast at West Runton, but managed to visit sites along the north coast, central heaths, southern brecklands and the eastern broads in Norfolk, with a couple of visits to sites in Suffolk too including Lakenheath and Minsmere.

Thursday
Started with West Runton picking up mass migration over the cliff tops with 12+ Yellow Wagtails, 300+ Swift, muliple House Martins and Whinchat, Whitethroat Wheatear and more, with Little Tern (3), Sandwich Tern (1) and Common Tern (8) flying past.

Moved on to visit Salthouse, Walsey Hills and Cley, walking the paths around the various fields and pool systems there. Picked up the local specialities in Egyptian Goose, Little Egret, Marsh Harrier, and Avocet (nesting literally everywhere), with Common Sandpiper, Black-tailed Godwits, LR PLover, Brent Geese (lazy birds who can't be bothered to fly up north yet!!). Gadwall seem to be more numerous than Mallard along this stretch of coast currently. Had plenty of warblers around Walsey Hills, including Whitethroat, Lesser Whitethroat, Cetti's, Garden and Willow Warbler and Chiffchaff of course.

Had a lovely walk around the fields near Choslsey Barns, but only added 6 Yellowhammer and lots of Hares and RL Partridge, Linnet etc.

Moved on to Titchwell and although no mega rarities I picked up a good number of birds, and it was particularly pleasant to observe many different waders in their summer plumage including Sanderling (200+), Dunlin (40+), Grey Plover (3), Redshank (10+), Spotted Redshank (1) and Little Egret. They were supported by lots of Yellow Wagtails fllying over, 3 White Wagtails on the fresh water pools islands, some Tufties, Shoveller and Teal, with the usual Marsh Harriers food passing and good sightings of Bearded Tits. 5 Little Tern present across the reserve with Common and Sandwich for comparisons.biggrin.gif

I went on to visit Wells for a bite to eat and then pottered around Holkam Pine for a while, but didn't add anything of note.

Friday

Was up early again to drive down to Lakenheath in Suffolk, although part of the reserve is on the Norfolk side. A very windy day, so not so good for searching the swaying poplars. Luckily we located a male Golden Oriole wink.gif after somebody had pointed us in the right direction. Beautiful bright yellow exotic bird, clinging for dear life on a branch in the high winds. Once the winds had calmed a little we added Cuckoo and Green Woodpecker, both flying past, with 100s Swift, House Martin, Swallow and Sand Martins to the list all being chased by 7-9 Hobby (which was a low number for site, as 30-40 had been recorded earlier in the week!!)

Moved on from Lakenheath and spent some time at Weeting Heath for Stone Curlew and Woodlark, but after several hours only heard the Stone Curlew! disbelief.gif

Stopped at Santon Downham picking up Crossbill smile.gif, Garden Warbler, Siskin and 3 Green Woodpecker (two feeding real close in a field). Lovely site, which also has Woodlark and Tree Pipit, but not showing that day!? Also tried for the Golden Pheasant at Sculthorpe Moor on way home, but only managed Barn Owl, Willow Tit and the commoner woodland birds.

Once home, had a potter around West Runton and picked up a family of Tawny Owls and Barn Owl in the light of the full moon. smile.gif

Saturday

Spent the majority of the morning around the broads at Hickling and Stubb Mill. Saw a lovely, but brief Bittern in flight biggrin.gif, lots of Bearded Tit, Tawny Owl in daylight!!, Avocet, Gerenshank, Black-tailed Godwit, Marsh Harriers all over the place and a few other smaller common waders.

Moved down to Suffolk again to Minsmere. A cracking place as ever, with Nightingale and Cetti's Warbler singing aplenty, but showing very badly cry.gif. Lots of other lovely summer plumaged birsd about with Little Stint, Knot, Black-tailed Godwit, Dunlin and Redshank, with Little (8), Common (100+) and Sandwich Tern (4) all over the place. Both Barnacle Geese and Med Gulls (6 pairs) nesting on the islands with a male Pintail also. Also saw the Kittiwake colony on the platforms out to sea to the south of the reserve towards the nuclear plant. Caught up with Willow Tit and GS Woodpecker in the woods. Popped over to Dunwich Heath and saw a Dartford Warbler briefly, but couldn't find any Woodlark in the heaths surrounding the roads nearby.

Sunday

After hearing about a Great Grey Shrike, Red-footed Falcon, Montagu's Harrier and Red-rumped Swallow being seen on Saturday on the north coast it was time for us to catch up with a rarer bird this morning. After brief stops at Cley and Salthouse we popped back to Weybourne where 2 Red-rumped Swallows were reported, on arrival we saw several swallows, got out of the car and there before us was a beautiful Red-rumped Swallow, if only everything had been so easy - ah well the joys of birding wink.gif. It stayed feeding for about 15 minutes, coming close enough to observe the demarcation of the tail's blue against the light belly/chest and the nice reddish on the head, oh and that red rump!!. Cracking bird and my first in the UK.

After this we passed by and pottered around a few Heaths picking up great views of Turtle Doves, Garden Wablers and the odd Nightingale. We went back to one of them later for Nightjar, but heard no churring at all, maybe they weren't back to that sight yet, but nevermind, get them in Wales next month!!smile.gif

All in all we got 122 species without twiching so to speak!?! Seems no mattter what time of year I go that is roughly the amount of species I get!?!

Great place though, will provide me with super memories for a while to come. biggrin.gif



MOved

-- Edited by Sean Sweeney on Wednesday 13th of May 2009 07:16:25 PM

-- Edited by Sean Sweeney on Wednesday 13th of May 2009 09:49:19 PM

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Norfolk, what a place. A very impressive amount of species there Sean.
For me, all Golden Pheasants are of dubious origin though!

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I was down in Norfolk over the weekend for a spot of birding, saw some crackers! As I was in Ipswich with work on Friday I thought I'd spend the weekend in Norfolk, but decided not to dash around too much and stayed along the north coast's many sites rather than delving into the broads or inland. I picked up 105 species in total including:

Friday late afternoon:
Black Brant, Marsh Harrier, Barn Owl and Cetti's Warbler at Cley.

Saturday:
Sherringham: Purple Sandpiper, RT/BTDiver, Fulmar, Turnstone, Brent Goose.
Salthouse: GN/RT Diver, Snow Bunting (20+), Dunlin.
Walney Hills: 1 Light-bellied Brent with the 300+ Dark bellied's
Cley: Black-tailed Godwit, Little Egret, Marsh Harrier, Eider (20+), RT 20+) and BT (1) Diver.
Roadside (numerous locations): RL Partridge 45-50.
Sculthorpe Reserve (Nr Fakenham): Golden Pheasant (4, of dubious origin!?), Little Egret, Water Rail (2), Brambling (20+), Marsh Tit (3), Siskin (60+).
Wells Harbour: RB Merganser (4).
Holkam Pine: Shoveller, Pintail, Egyptian Goose, POchard, Little Egret, Marsh Harrier.
Stiffkey Fen: PF Goose (5000+ fly-over), Little Egret (10-15), Marsh Harrier (at least 4), SE Owl (v.distant), Merlin, Barn Owl (2).

Sunday:
West Runton (where the flat I stay in is!):
In field near next to a shelter (kept me out of the wind and rain) - Turnstone (8), Grey Plover (50+ in field), Golden Plover (100+), Lapwing (100+), Ringed Plover, Mediteranean Gull (1 adult), Skylark (2).
Off the coast - BT (1) and RT (20+) Diver, Guillemot (30+), Razorbill (2), Fulmar (15+), Balearic Shearwater!!!!!!, lifer for me!!!!
Brancaster Marsh: Grey Plover, Dunlin, Redshank, Bar-tailed Godwit, Little Egret, Peregrine (seen catching teal, then dropping it and a Marsh Harrier taking it - gutted for the peregrine), Marsh Harrier(3), Mealy Redpoll (2), Bearded Tit (3), Goldcrest (1), Redwing (3).
Titchwell: Water Pipit, Bearded Tit (2), Marsh Harrier (2), Little Egret, Black Brant, Twite (30+), Avocet (7), Gadwall (5+), Goldeneye, Common Scoter, Pintail, Bar-tailed Godwit (30+), Dunlin (100+), Oystercatcher (50+), Grey Plover (30+), Turnstone (30+), RT Diver (4).

Added Rook on the road near King's Lynn, which always seems difficult to pick up elsewhere.

So not a bad haul!! The Balearic Shearwater was the pick of the bunch, as I had heard it had been seen off the coast on Friday and that it had been wintering. I had no joy during my 2 hours sea watching off Shrringham on Saturday morning, but on Sunday I decided to check out the local coast, which proved very productive for all sorts of other species too. After I'd set my scope up and was enjoying a flask coffee I saw a bird flying east at 8:10-15, shearwater-like. I had it in the telescope and was certain it was not a Manx, due to it not being very black and having a darker underside, with un-obvious white patch on belly. I watched it in awe, for several minutes as it went from my left to my right, then dissappeared out of my view behind the cliffs! biggrin.gif

Although I missed out on the returning Ross's Goose, couldn't locate any WF Geese and failed again to see Bittern it was a cracking and in the most part a relaxing weekend. Can't wait for the Manchester Birders trip to Scotland to see some more winter specialities!?!? But for now will get back into the swing of watching my local grey reservoir!?! wink.gif

-- Edited by Sean Sweeney at 18:49, 2009-01-26

-- Edited by Sean Sweeney at 18:50, 2009-01-26

-- Edited by Sean Sweeney at 18:52, 2009-01-26

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Decided to take Marks route which was very easy to follow and traffic wasnt too bad.
During our stay in north norfolk visited snetisham,tichwell,cley,weeting and lakenheath all fantastic places for birding and im unable to pick a favourite place they were all that good.
the highlight of the holiday was accidently dropping on the montagus harrier which i had incorrectly informed the local farmer was a hen harrier who immediately put me straight.this was only half a mile from where we were staying and we new nothing about it.also we had the pleasure of watching a barn owl every evening and morning from our bedroom window who we later named Barniebiggrin.gif
We had 6 lifers biggrin.gifegypt goose,hobby,honey buzzard,yellow legged gull,stone curlew and montagus harrier.
I was suprised to see 16 greenshank at snetisham and half a dozen egyptian geese along with good numbers of redshank,avocets,common and sandwich tern great place to watch thousands of knot reeling on the wash.we also had 2 med gulls,2 spotted redshank,50+dunlin.
we were lucky enough to see 3 stone curlews at weeting along with little owl and a cuckoo which gave very impressive views for about 10 min.
lakenheath was great for hobby 4 birds seen also marsh harrier ,green woodpecker and a kingfisher were the highlights here.Im pretty sure i got my bins on a juv golden oriole but not long enough to give me a tick the call from an adult put me onto it.
cley was great for close views of bittern,6 marsh harrier, bearded tits,6 spoonbill,yellow leg gull ,terns and avocet.
titchwell great for 6 marsh harrier,bearded tits,terns,ruff,dunlin, ringed plover and avocets.
great rybrough raptor watchpoint good for hobby,marsh harrier and honey buzzard.
first ever visit to norfolk and simply the best birding we have had and didnt even touch welney and minsmere.cant wait to go again biggrin.gifthanks to past posts such a big help.

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Will try that next time Tom.

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When I lived in South Manchester I tried loads of different routes to Norfolk (via Stoke, via Buxton, via Leeds), and eventually I worked out that this was by far the best route:

M60 - M67 - A628 (Woodhead) - A616 - M1 south - M18 north - A1 south to Newark - A17

I know that the M18 north bit sounds weird, but it destroys that little link along the A57 which can be pretty bad at times. Didsbury to Kings Lynn used to take me only 15 minutes. Kind of.

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cheers everyone thanks for the useful infobiggrin.gif

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You can be in Newark in 70 mins from Oldham

Motorway all the way!

Cheers

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Does that beat Woodhead, M1, A57, A1, A17?

Might depend on where you set off from...weirdface.gif

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Gary,

The quickest biggrin.gifand easiest way to Norfolk is

M62 east to A1 south to Newark then A17 to kings lynn then do a left at the big roundabout onto the A149. Stay on this to Wells.

Cheers

Riggers

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hi can anyone give best route to norfolk wells area.so many different ways to get there and im getting lost alreadyconfused.gif

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Iain,

Myself and Mike Chorley were at Warham Greens in January and got talking to a local who said they hadnt had a Short Eared Owl all winter which was unusual for there. Both Harrier numbers were down as well. I think that it has been a very mild winter this year,so much so that we had Hen Harrier on the moors in December and in GM in February, so I think that is the answer. Horsey wasnt as good as recent years as well. Only managed about 40 Marsh and 3 Hen Harrierhmm.gif(you would cut your right arm off for that in GM). Last January we had over 70 Marsh in the air at once!!nod.gif

Cheers Riggers

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managed 99 species last weekend (or 101 UK 400 club!) - sacred ibis and brant were the two non-BOU bids

but missed loads of common stuff like woodpeckers, seas ducks! some of the scarer stuff not about either like crane or rough legged buzzard

up to 5 lapland with the snow bunting but no shore lark around. sparrow was obliging plus found two brant geese and at least 29 marsh harriers at stubb mill watch point but only one brief view of hen harrier. Got three HH at warham but no other raptors. Have been to both sites previously and done really well with both harriers. My last visit to warham had three harrier sp in larger numbers, SE Owl and merlin at least - any reason for this remarkable change? Food / weather / climate / persecution?

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Trip report.

Had a few days down Norfolk way last week. Not a great count of birds only 92, which was a little disappointing, but we did have a couple of days where the weather was very much against us.

We arrived on Tuesday afternoon and headed straight for the White-crowned Sparrow at Cley. The light was fading, but we had reasonable views and got a couple of decent photos and a Barn Owl hunting in the field behind us was a bonus. Then we went for the Buntings at Salthouse. By now the light was fading, so no photos, but we did get Snow Buntings and one Lapland Bunting.

Wednesday we went hunting field around Saxingham for flocks of geese. Found a large flock of several thousand mainly Pink-foot with a few Greylags and two Rosss Geese. Back to Cley for that Sparrow, but again the light wasnt great. Then on to Salthouse again to try for some photos. Got some good pictures of the Snow Buntings, but there was no sign of the Lapland. Was going to go for the three Shore Larks at Cley, but were told they were heading our way, so we searched the dunes between Salthouse and Cley, but no sign. As we wanted to go to Stubbs Mill raptor watchpoint, we decided to give them a miss and set off east. Stopping off at Cromer we searched for the Waxwing in a supermarket car park, but it seems it had left a day or so before. More searching geese flocks around Horsey gave us some White-fronted geese. We arrived at Stubbs Mill and settled down to watch the harrier feast. Turned out not to be such a feast after all! We had about 20 Marsh Harriers and two female Hen Harriers, but all were quite distant. Even the solitary Barn Owl was some distance away. We did get 11 cranes though and two were close enough to get a photo. Not the best pic, but better than nothing, and my first photo of a crane. Also some very nice flocks of Fieldfare and Redwing.

Next day, Thursday, started horribly it was absolutely dark grey, windy and very wet. Decided on Titchwell so we could at least stay out of the rain in the hides. Trouble is, the birds seemed to have the same idea about staying dry! We did manage to get our duck counnt up, and got a few waders including a single Avocet and several Spotted Redshank. We also saw the Woodcock, but again I didnt manage a photo as it was well in the shrubs. The weather seemed to turn a little better in the afternoon so we went to try to catch up on the Great Grey Shrike at Royden Common. Again, we seemed a day late as it was nowhere to be seen. Watched a female Marsh Harrier and a female Hen Harrier having an arial match with each other. There had been reports of a shrike at Dersingham, but again it wasnt there for us. Sue managed to catch a glimpse of a Golden Pheasant as we drove past. All in all a bit of a disappointing day.

Last day, Friday, saw us driving down to Lynford to get the Hawfinch a dead cert. Again, not for us. The wind was really blowing hard and despite several birders birders on the look out, the Hawfinch seemed to not want to appear in their favourite tree. We gave up and went to Welney for the Tundra Bean Geese. These werent in the field that they usually frequent and a member of staff said they hadnt been seen for a couple of days. Oh well, we popped into a couple of hides to watch the hundreds of Pochard fighting against the rough water and a Merlin. Looking to the right I found the three Bean Geese! At last, a bit of luck. Time was getting on, and theres only so many Pochard one can take in a day, so we decided to head home. We stopped off at Frampton Marsh on the way and were treated to a male Hen Harrier making its way up and down the marsh. Watching Little Egrets struggling against the wind, it was quite a surprise to see how well the harrier coped.

Not the best trip to Norfolk weve had but we did get 5 lifers (WC Sparrow, Snow and Lapland Buntings, Tundra Bean Goose and Rosss Goose (dubious origins though). Anyway, weve already got our next trip booked for the end of April, so we can put this one behind us and look forward to the next one.


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latest update: December 2016

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This forum is dedicated to the memory of Eva Janice McKerchar; rest in peace mum.