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Post Info TOPIC: MARSHSIDE RSPB


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RE: MARSHSIDE RSPB


1.30 - 3.00 highlights

Long Tailed Duck
Pintail x 100's
Wigeon x100's
Pink Footed Geese x 100's
Barnacle Goose associating with a small flock of Canada Geese
Huge number of Black Tailed Godwit several 1000


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Visited yesterday afternoon after a trip to Martin Mere the outer marsh still flooded following high tide

Excellent numbers of birds about especially at junction pool. Highlights

Ross's Goose (?) very close views from Sandgrounder's Hide

Long Tailed Duck

Merlin

Golden Plover

Dunlin

Knot

Barnacle Goose

Black Tailed Godwit

 



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Thanks Jonathan, i'll try my luck tomorrow!

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I don't think the Baikal's been seen for a couple of weeks now, but there's at least one Great White Egret still being seen regularly, usually on the outer marsh. Yesterday there were 30+ Barnacle Geese from Sandgrounders, a couple of Peregrines, several Ruff and lots of Black-tailed Godwits, Wigeon, Teal and Golden Plover. Plus a Great Northern Diver on the Marine Lake!

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Has there been any recent sightings of the Baikal Teal or the Great White Egret?blankstare

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Rob Creek wrote:

Mike Chorley wrote:

After a late lunch in Sandgrounders watching a Peregrine spooking the waterfowl we headed down to the Marine Lake for the Egret roost. 63 Little Egrets and 1 Great White Egret had come in by the time we set off home. A modest total of 47 species for the day but some good birds none-the-less. Good numbers of Golden Plover & Black-tailed Godwit and impressive numbers of Shelduck and Cormorant on the sea.

I don't know how it fits in with other sightings of the Baikal Teal, but the bird was found today with Wigeon (none of which were on the Outer Marsh when we arrived) and its' disappearance last Monday afternoon coincided with the departure of the Wigeon from the usual channel when all the wildfowl were flushed, so anyone still looking for it may do well to seek out the Wigeon.



-- Edited by Mike Chorley on Sunday 8th of December 2013 10:13:17 PM





Hi Mike,
When I arrived at lunchtime, I actually parked up at Crossens Outer Marsh and made the correct decision to ask some birders if the Baikal Teal was still showing well, to which they replied "yes mate but you're in the wrong place, it's been on the inner marsh all morning and is still there now" so from that comment I knew it hadn't been at the Outer Marsh and I drove round there to the Inner Marsh.

You're Peregrinne sighting totally fits in with ours as we watched the Baikal get flushed by the raptor, whereas you would only have seen a shed load of Wigeon take to the air from where you were...
...and you're comment about it favouring to stick with the Wigeon is also correct, and I heard a few birders say that today. Despite it being a Teal (and incidently has the vertical white bar of the Green Winged Teal) it is actually a bit larger on average than the Eurasian and Green Winged Teal and I think this factor could explain to some degree why it prefers to be with Wigeon, Mallard, and the Pintail. It probably feels that much safer with larger species by its side.
Cheers
Rob

-- Edited by Rob Creek on Monday 9th of December 2013 03:10:04 PM

Hi Rob, we didn't actually see it flush the Wigeon, it was operating well over to our left over the area next to the road when we were watching it. From Sandgrounders we could see the birders on the embanked path but not the birds on the deck. As Gordon has commented, both the Teal (if genuine) and some of the wintering Wigeon come from the same area of Russia, so it probably came with them and is hanging around with its' travelling companions. Another plus point for it being the real deal.

-- Edited by Mike Chorley on Monday 9th of December 2013 09:23:33 PM


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Regarding the Baikal Teal.
The bird has been compared with male that was transferred from Castle Espie WWT to Martin Mere very recently. This bird hatched this Spring and shows very similar plumage development. Young males acquire the full adult head pattern in their second calendar year. Wigeon migrate to the Ribble Estuary from a similar direction to that which a vagrant Baikal Teal would come from. I am assured by experts that there is no reason to doubt the birds wild origins.

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9.15 - 15.00, 35 species seen highlights.

Baikal Teal on the inner marsh, As suggested below associating with Wigeon
Long Tailed Duck
Pintail
Merlin on the outer marsh perched on top of a large dead tree stump
Ruff
Pink Footed Geese 100's


-- Edited by Mark Burgess on Monday 9th of December 2013 05:42:55 PM

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Mike Chorley wrote:

After a late lunch in Sandgrounders watching a Peregrine spooking the waterfowl we headed down to the Marine Lake for the Egret roost. 63 Little Egrets and 1 Great White Egret had come in by the time we set off home. A modest total of 47 species for the day but some good birds none-the-less. Good numbers of Golden Plover & Black-tailed Godwit and impressive numbers of Shelduck and Cormorant on the sea.

I don't know how it fits in with other sightings of the Baikal Teal, but the bird was found today with Wigeon (none of which were on the Outer Marsh when we arrived) and its' disappearance last Monday afternoon coincided with the departure of the Wigeon from the usual channel when all the wildfowl were flushed, so anyone still looking for it may do well to seek out the Wigeon.



-- Edited by Mike Chorley on Sunday 8th of December 2013 10:13:17 PM





Hi Mike,
When I arrived at lunchtime, I actually parked up at Crossens Outer Marsh and made the correct decision to ask some birders if the Baikal Teal was still showing well, to which they replied "yes mate but you're in the wrong place, it's been on the inner marsh all morning and is still there now" so from that comment I knew it hadn't been at the Outer Marsh and I drove round there to the Inner Marsh.

You're Peregrinne sighting totally fits in with ours as we watched the Baikal get flushed by the raptor, whereas you would only have seen a shed load of Wigeon take to the air from where you were...
...and you're comment about it favouring to stick with the Wigeon is also correct, and I heard a few birders say that today. Despite it being a Teal (and incidently has the vertical white bar of the Green Winged Teal) it is actually a bit larger on average than the Eurasian and Green Winged Teal and I think this factor could explain to some degree why it prefers to be with Wigeon, Mallard, and the Pintail. It probably feels that much safer with larger species by its side.
Cheers
Rob

-- Edited by Rob Creek on Monday 9th of December 2013 03:10:04 PM

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Oldham Birders monthly trip. Riggers, Mike Ausberger, self & Hon. Oldhamer(biggrin) Karen F.

Morning visit to Crossens Outer Marsh failed to produce anything of note apart from 2 Great White Egret and 1 Rob Smallwood. Unlike the line of birders snaking along the embankment, most of the waterfowl kept out of the wind down in the channel which the Baikal Teal had been frequenting!no

Just before 11 a.m. we moved to the screen at Junction Pool for an early lunch and a look at the Long-tailed Duck. Both were quickly interrupted by news that the Teal had been found on the landward side of Crossens Inner Marsh among a group of several hundred Wigeon. Despite going the long way round (biggrin) we were quickly on the scene and scanning "the fifth point". The bird was initially quite well tucked in among the snoozing Wigeon but was bullied futher left, giving better views. After a couple more commutes between these spots the bird moved much further left and to the back of the flock giving good views

After a late lunch in Sandgrounders watching a Peregrine spooking the waterfowl we headed down to the Marine Lake for the Egret roost. 63 Little Egrets and 1 Great White Egret had come in by the time we set off home. A modest total of 47 species for the day but some good birds none-the-less. Good numbers of Golden Plover & Black-tailed Godwit and impressive numbers of Shelduck and Cormorant on the sea.

I don't know how it fits in with other sightings of the Baikal Teal, but the bird was found today with Wigeon (none of which were on the Outer Marsh when we arrived) and its' disappearance last Monday afternoon coincided with the departure of the Wigeon from the usual channel when all the wildfowl were flushed, so anyone still looking for it may do well to seek out the Wigeon.



-- Edited by Mike Chorley on Sunday 8th of December 2013 10:13:17 PM

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This afternoon - good to see some familiar faces out here and meet some new faces.

Well worth the drive to get my 1st Baikal Teal.

The bird had moved from Crossens Outer Marsh to the Inner Marsh virtually in the same location where I had a Spoonbill back in April. Located the bird in the vast numbers, bit far out for a photo with my equipment but good views with my trusty Nocs!
Everything took to the air after getting restless so we had to find it again which didn't take long. After a while they took to the air yet again and this time it was a Peregrinne that flushed them all up, it was a fairly smallish one so could've been a young one.
I relocated the Baikal fairly quickly and it settled down for a rest with its head tucked well in. This is when it made a fool of me, as it was resting, I was talking to another birder, I glanced back at the Baikal and thought it's still resting. Few minutes later I said 'it looks like it's not moving for a while now' to which I got the reply 'which bird are you watching?'
Another bird had moved into the same spot where the Baikal Teal was and began resting, while I was talking, the Baikal had waddled a 100yds off to the left. I was watching the wrong bloody bird!
It then disappeared into a ditch below one of the ridges and didn't show again while I was there.

1 Baikal Teal
1 Peregrinne Falcon
1 Black Tailed Godwit
2 Dunlin
3 Little Egret (1 was quite large but was definitely Little Egret)
A few Redwings over
Alot of Pink Footed Geese, Wigeon, Teal, Mallard, Pintail and a few pairs of Shoveler.

Also a Gull roost in the same field mainly consisting of...
Black Headed Gulls
Herring Gulls
3 Great Black-Backed Gulls and
a few Lesser Black-Backed Gulls

My opinion for what it's worth, although I'm no expert on Hybridisation, I've only studied it a little bit in A-level Biology, but had I been the one making the call as to whether the Baikal Teal was genuine full breed or a hybrid, I would probably have said genuine, although that said, it does lack the chinstrap which could be variation, and I think there's an overall look and feel about it that says genuine. Like I said, I'm no expert, and it is only my opinion.

Cheers
Rob



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late post for 7th dec. 50 species

Baikal teal still present on crossens outer marsh, distant scope views amongst the huge numbers of teal & wigeon. lots of golden plovers in the same area with distant waders, possibly knot & dunlin. 2 great white egrets.

along the beach which was very quiet apart from...

shelducks
curlews
pink footed geese
meadow pipits & linnets, only seen 1 skylark
1 reed bunting
3 little egrets

nels hide...

1 long tailed duck, junction pool.
1 water rail, swam in front of nels hide.
3 ruff
2 golden plover amongst the lapwings
hundreds of teal, wigeon, pintail & shovelers.

sandgrousers hide...

1 barnacle goose
3 pochards
5 little egrets
again hundreds of teal, pintail & wigeon.

only counted 33 little egrets going to roost inc the 2 great whites.
no raptors.



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In addition to the Baikal Teal on Crossens outer marsh (National Mega Sightings thread), the Ross's Goose and Long-tailed Duck were seen to be still present this morning. Also 2 Great white Egrets were on the outer marsh.



-- Edited by sid ashton on Thursday 5th of December 2013 09:12:06 PM

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Aswell as the Baikal Teal & Ross's Goose (see mega sightings), Marsh Harrier, plus reports of Great White Egret & Merlin

The Long-tailed Duck was still present on Saturday

There also seem to a number of hybrid wildfowl around this area, keep an eye out for probable Baikal Teal x Teal, Chiloe x Eurasian Wigeon & Snow x Greylag Goose smile

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a.m. visit, good views of 2 female Merlin, Ross's Goose, Long-tailed Duck and a Great White Egret plus large numbers of all the regular birds with at least 300 Skylark on the marsh by the old sand works.
Cheers Ian

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On my way to see my brother in Southport today managed a couple of short birding stops:- of interest at Crossens Marsh, 2 Great White Egrets, minimum 6 Little Egrets, a Peregrine and a Merlin. At the junction pool the longish staying female Long-tailed Duck spent a lot of time under water smile

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Jonathan Platt wrote:


Hi Rob,

Probably less than 100 Common Sandpiper winter in the UK each year, mainly in the SW. They generally winter by flowing water and alone, but not always - for instance, I seem to remember three wintering together on the River Clwyd (?) in North Wales in recent years, and I think two have wintered at Condor Green near Lancaster. According to the Cheshire atlas 1-5 winter in that region every year. Once they've found a place to winter they'll probably see the period out in that area. So, as you can see, the chances of five Common Sands suddenly appearing at Marshside then, just as swiftly, disappearing (no-one else has seen any as far as I'm aware?), are pretty remote. Not saying it's impossible Rob, just that it's highly unlikely. Did you notice if the birds you saw had the characteristic bobbing motion of Common Sandpipers?




Totally get what you're saying their Jonathan, and this is the confusing bit, I did not see the bobbing motion as I lost them when they went to ground. They flew in from the left as though from over Junction Pool, very low over the water and not a constant flap but more of mixed flap and glide in as Sandpiper do, the white wing bar visible, basically brownish in colour with white underparts, and too small to be a Black Tailed Godwit, but they landed virtually in with the Black-Wits, and where there was literally 100's of them and it being uneven terrain to the right of Nel's, I totally lost these few birds, so what had the characteristics of Sandpiper could well be something different as I haven't witnessed the giveaway Bobbing.
Cheers
Rob

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Gordon Taylor wrote:

Hi Rob, Martin Mere is probably the best place in the country to see Ruff throughout the year. Post breeding males (still in their finery) appear in July followed by females then juveniles which causes great confusion with the variety of sizes and plumages. Regularly 100+ winter there and are often seen closely from Raine's Observatory eating grain from the Swan Feeds. Late birds can linger into early May.






Hi Gordon,
Yeah I'm well aware of Ruff sizes, plumage, etc. differences causing problems. I had some shots last year with the masses of Pink Footed Geese, Whooper Swan, Pintail, etc and every so often was a wader in the hustle and bustle. I think I managed to ID one correctly although straight forward enough as a Ruff, but another bird had me pulling my hair out. Ian M had to ID it for me as another Ruff and I would never have got it!

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Rob Creek wrote:

I will put it down to Dunlin as they were a bit far away to positively ID and went to ground very quickly, I would've expected Golden Plover as appearing larger in flight, and there were already Golden Plover present (easily visible) which came in separately but some mixed with the Lapwing.

There was nothing that suggested anything other than Sandpiper to me, but if you're saying you won't get them in a group of 5, only singles, then I'm unsure what they were, certainly appeared to be just Common Sandpipers. It was time of year that got me, and if you say 91 Ruff were counted at Martin Mere, would it be that unusual for only 5 Sandpipers together to be still here?
Asking the question...not questioning your comment so to speak.
Cheers
Rob




Hi Rob,

Probably less than 100 Common Sandpiper winter in the UK each year, mainly in the SW. They generally winter by flowing water and alone, but not always - for instance, I seem to remember three wintering together on the River Clwyd (?) in North Wales in recent years, and I think two have wintered at Condor Green near Lancaster. According to the Cheshire atlas 1-5 winter in that region every year. Once they've found a place to winter they'll probably see the period out in that area. So, as you can see, the chances of five Common Sands suddenly appearing at Marshside then, just as swiftly, disappearing (no-one else has seen any as far as I'm aware?), are pretty remote. Not saying it's impossible Rob, just that it's highly unlikely. Did you notice if the birds you saw had the characteristic bobbing motion of Common Sandpipers?

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Hi Rob, Martin Mere is probably the best place in the country to see Ruff throughout the year. Post breeding males (still in their finery) appear in July followed by females then juveniles which causes great confusion with the variety of sizes and plumages. Regularly 100+ winter there and are often seen closely from Raine's Observatory eating grain from the Swan Feeds. Late birds can linger into early May.

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Jon Bowen wrote:

Rob,

The American Wigeon has been knocking about for a week or so and is widely reported as a hybrid, confirmed by significantly more able birders than me from stills and video footage.

The smew has been at HOM for at least a week ( I saw it last Saturday) and is frequenting the one permanent pool which is about 400 yds up from the shelter






Hi Jon,
Yep the very same pool at HOM a bit further up to what looks like a tram stop (shelter).
Only 2 birds, 1 Curlew and 1 Little Egret, although that's not to say it wasn't there, it could well have been sheltering somewhere, it was cold and bleak out there.
The American Wigeon I wasn't even going to try as it could've been anywhere, and possibly hidden from view anyway.

Jonathan, (and Sid)
I will put it down to Dunlin as they were a bit far away to positively ID and went to ground very quickly, I would've expected Golden Plover as appearing larger in flight, and there were already Golden Plover present (easily visible) which came in separately but some mixed with the Lapwing.

There was nothing that suggested anything other than Sandpiper to me, but if you're saying you won't get them in a group of 5, only singles, then I'm unsure what they were, certainly appeared to be just Common Sandpipers. It was time of year that got me, and if you say 91 Ruff were counted at Martin Mere, would it be that unusual for only 5 Sandpipers together to be still here?
Asking the question...not questioning your comment so to speak.
Cheers
Rob


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Just realised on re-reading Rob's post, that you guys were talking about the possibility of 5 Common Sandpipers at Marshside doh

Anyway there was only one at BMW !!!!!

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Jonathan Platt wrote:

A single Common Sandpiper would be unusual at this time of year Rob...........

Of interest there was also a single Common Sandpiper at Burton Mere Wetlands last week on Thursday the 14th, perhaps the same bird.



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Rob Creek wrote:

Saturday 16th Nov.
One birder reported an American Wigeon on the reserve but I couldn't pick it out of the vast numbers, he said its most likely a hybrid, but having not seen it I couldn't possibly make that judgement. Same birder reported a Smew at Hesketh Out Marsh but when I arrived there was barely a single bird of any species that I could see besides a Curlew and a Little Egret.

A couple of things I'd appreciate any comments on...

Firstly the Ruff was pointed out to me at Nel's by a kind birder and it certainly looked like a Ruff, and I thought I had 5 Common Sandpiper at Nel's also. Does anyone else besides myself think it's quite late for these 2 species to be still here or have some lingered on with the slightly milder than usual weather?

Secondly, 2 large flocks of small waders approx 70+each came swooping in on the far side of Nel's pool and vanished into the ditchy ground. I'm putting them down as most likely being Sanderlings. ???

Cheers
Rob





A single Common Sandpiper would be unusual at this time of year Rob, five points towards them being another species. Someone counted 91 Ruff at Martin Mere yesterday so it's not unusual to see them at this time of year, you might find this interesting:

http://www.cheshireandwirralbirdatlas.org/species/ruff-wintering.htm

I doubt very much the other waders you saw were Sanderling, they're normally found on the beach/mudflats. That number points towards Dunlin perhaps if they were indeed small, though I didn't see any there yesterday. Sure they weren't Golden Plover Rob?

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Rob,

The American Wigeon has been knocking about for a week or so and is widely reported as a hybrid, confirmed by significantly more able birders than me from stills and video footage.

The smew has been at HOM for at least a week ( I saw it last Saturday) and is frequenting the one permanent pool which is about 400 yds up from the shelter

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Saturday 16th Nov.

- Ross's Goose on pool opposite Sandgrounders.
- Long Tailed Duck (winter female) at Junction Pool view screen.
- Black Tailed Godwits approx 600+ and increasing at Nel's
- Lapwing approx 300+ at Nel's
- Golden Plover approx 200+ Nel's
- Redshank group of about 20 Nel's
- Pink Footed Goose approx 1500 maybe more
- Greylag Goose maybe 15+
- Little Egret 4
- Curlew (dotted around and some with the Godwits)
- Ruff 1
- Skylark 1
- Kestrel 4
- Redwings (1's + 2's over) approx 20
- Linnets ...quite a few knocking around including right outside Sandgrounders in the Gorse Bush
- few mixed flocks of Finch and Tits
- Ducks...Mallard, Teal, Pintail, Gadwall, Shoveler, Shelduck, and Wigeon. Most of them in good numbers.
- Usuals...
- Canada Geese, Coots, Moorhens, Black Headed Gulls, Herring Gulls, and a Great Black-Backed Gull had the Godwits and the
other waders spooked up a couple of times.

One birder reported an American Wigeon on the reserve but I couldn't pick it out of the vast numbers, he said its most likely a hybrid, but having not seen it I couldn't possibly make that judgement. Same birder reported a Smew at Hesketh Out Marsh but when I arrived there was barely a single bird of any species that I could see besides a Curlew and a Little Egret.

A couple of things I'd appreciate any comments on...

Firstly the Ruff was pointed out to me at Nel's by a kind birder and it certainly looked like a Ruff, and I thought I had 5 Common Sandpiper at Nel's also. Does anyone else besides myself think it's quite late for these 2 species to be still here or have some lingered on with the slightly milder than usual weather?

Secondly, 2 large flocks of small waders approx 70+each came swooping in on the far side of Nel's pool and vanished into the ditchy ground. I'm putting them down as most likely being Sanderlings. ???

Cheers
Rob

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Friday, November 15th.

Ross's Goose 1...It's about time Ross came to collect his Goose!
Long-tailed Duck 1f
Merlin 1m
Sparrowhawk 1
Little Egret 2
Golden Plover 200+
Lapwing 500+
Black-tailed Godwit 500+
Curlews
Wigeons
Pintails
Teal
Gadwall
Shovelers
Shelducks
Pink-footed Geese 1000+
etc.etc.etc. The numbers are a bit guessametrical but there were lots of birds!


-- Edited by Ian McKerchar on Friday 15th of November 2013 09:07:14 PM

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11.30-5pm

along the beach...

lots of redshanks, oystercatchers, curlews, shelducks
more waders but distant due to low tide.
1 knot, 9 snipe, 1 merlin, 2 little egrets
meadow pipits, skylarks & linnets flying around.

nels hide...

huge numbers of teal, wigeon, pintails & black tailed godwits
pink footed geese scattered around
5 ruff, 1 sparrrowhawk.

sandgrousers hide...

much the same as nels with hundreds of golden plovers with the lapwings
ross's goose on the pool.

outer marsh...

hundreds of pink footed geese
1 kestrel, 1 buzzard, 1 peregrine falcon, 8 little egrets
goldfinches, linnets, meadow pipits & skylarks around old sand works.

got comfy on the bench looking onto rimmers marsh around 3.35pm to watch the egret roost, ideal position, 46 little egrets passed over me then the 47th & 48th was the great white egrets biggrin plus one cracking sunset smile

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session over lunch time

2 Merlin
2 Peregrines
2 Sparrowhawks

On the shore
Grey Plover
Sanderling (90)
Oystercatcher
Barnacle Goose
Black -Tailed Godwits
Teal
Wigeon
and the Ross's Goose (??)

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Late post for yesterday 19th:
Approx 40 Pink-footed Geese flew toward the office on Wennington Road and then changed direction toward Marshside

Today 8am: another 200 approx Pink-footed Geese over Southport on the way in to work

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Mid-September raid at Southport -

Beach - Couple of Little Egrets, Dunlin flock (aka quiet)

Nel's - 12 Snipe, 1 Ruff, nos of Wigeon, Teal, Gadwall, Shoveler, Black Tailed Godwit, 1 Ringed Plover.

Sandgrounders - 2 Little Grebes, 1 Female Sparrowhawk flew right past the hide and close, odd Dunlin + offering of waterfowl as per Nel's
Plus Meadow Pipits, Goldfinches etc etc

Merlin reported.

Quiet, but still gets me used to the wellies for a long and exciting Autumn!



-- Edited by John Doherty on Friday 13th of September 2013 08:39:00 PM

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couple of visits this afternoon and evening:

good numbers of Black-tailed Godwits, Dunlin (only one juv.) and Snipe with a supporting cast of Lapwing, Redshank and Oystercatcher and a solitary Ruff.

I found a "Wood Sandpiper" but the only other guy in the hide reckoned it was a young Redshank. After a while he started to have doubts but then it called and flew off, leaving him relieved and me feeling a bit silly no

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Another warm, hot day, bar a short rain shower as I was taking the coast route home.

The undoubted highlight was a lifer, several! - C30 passage Sandwich Terns West of the Southport Pier. Also flocks of Ringed Plover, Dunlin, Oystercatchers and Black/tailed Godwits.

Over towards the main RSPB reserve was three Little Egrets on the marsh plus some Redshanks.

Sandgrounders had the main bulk of birds (Nel's was dried out and dead quiet) - the ditch running adjecant to Marshside Road contained 8 Common Snipe and a Common Sandpiper, and the reserve itself had one of each; 1 Avocet, 200+ Black-tailed Godwits, nice Redshanks in front of the hide, Oystercatchers + usuals and there were odd Shelducks on the marsh.



-- Edited by John Doherty on Wednesday 24th of July 2013 09:01:05 PM

-- Edited by Ian McKerchar on Wednesday 24th of July 2013 09:15:34 PM

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Short visit, Wednesday, 26th June.

Avocet 2ads 1juv
Redshank 2
Oystercatcher 3
Little Egret 2
Common Sandpiper 1
Black-tailed Godwits
Shelducks
House Martins
Swallows
Meadow Pipit 1
Skylarks

etc.

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9.30 -1.30, Highlights.

Sandgrounders hide,
Avocet 2
Black Tailed Godwit 100+
Oystercatcher 20+
Redshank 20+
On path to car park
Reed Bunting
Sedge Warbler
Garden Warbler

Junction Pool,
Avocet 2+1 chick
Little Egret

Nel's hide,
Reed Warbler
Dunlin 50+
Black Tailed Godwit 70
Redshank 16

Out On the salt marsh,
Ringed Plover 2
Redshank
Linnet
Meadow Pipit
Skylark


-- Edited by Mark Burgess on Monday 17th of June 2013 05:28:21 PM

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Went with my twin brother Jamie to spend much of the day here:

Saltmarsh coming in from town centre- 1 Little Egret, 1 Oystercatcher, some Redshanks, Linnets, Skylarks, Meadow Pipits, lots of Reed Buntings, and Starlings, some Wood Pigeon, Canada Goose etc etc

Reserve - Took in all hides including viewing platform - Shelducks, including parents with eight ducklings; Mallard broods x 2, lots of grown Goslings; 22 Avocets, Black Tailed Godwits and Redshanks plenty, Mute Swans, Tufted Ducks, 100+ Dunlins, further Oystercatchers, 1 Swallow, loads of Swifts, some Housemartins, Reed Warbler right in front of Nel's singing and showed, Sedge Warbler heard.

Obviously quiet this time of the year but enjoyable all the same.





-- Edited by John Doherty on Wednesday 12th of June 2013 05:29:12 PM

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Keep calm and carry on birding....


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09.00-11.30

Old Sand Works

12 Linnets, 4 Meadow Pipits and 240 Starlings (2 large flocks containing approx 50% juveniles). Masses of Starlings on the saltmarsh too.

Sandgrounders Area

Just the usual species, lots of half grown chicks amongst the Black Headed Gulls on their small island. Avocets brooding right in front of the hide.

4 adult Canada Geese were shepherding 12 well grown young along in a creche, and forced them to swim in a ditch, the adults took no messing around from the goslings.

Lots of Canada and Greylag goslings elsewhere, families of Mallard etc too.

The Junction Pool held just few Shelduck and gulls.

Nels Hide

6 Little Egrets, 2 Grey Herons, lots of Avocets and Black Tailed Godwits, Dunlin and Ringed Plover dotted around too.

1 Sedge Warbler close to the hide. ( 1 Spotted Flycatcher reported this morning here, but not seen by me)

Hesketh Road

1 Little Egret plus Canada Geese, gulls etc.



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John Williams


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09.30-13.00

Apart from a few Meadow Pipits (One carrying a large crane fly) and a Magpie no other birds around the old sand works.

The scrub/bushes along the roadside north of Sandgrounders held 5 Linnets, 2 Sedge Warblers, 2 Whitethroats and a Dunnock.

Just the usual birds visable from Sandgrounders, including a flock of 75 Black Tailed Godwits, plus 6 Dunlin.

A Peregrine plunged into a swirling mass of panicking godwits at one stage, it did'nt take any, although I got the impression it could of done so if it really tried, then flew across to Crossens Outer.

The breeding Black Headed Gulls are mostly massed on the small island at Sandgrounders, where several have chicks, apparently there as been a lot of predation by foxes elsewhere.

4+ Skylarks in song flight over the outer marsh. Anxious Redshanks virtually everywhere, flying low across the road at car level, I fear some will get clobbered by traffic.

At the Junction Pool, Reed Warblers are showing well, chasing each other around the reed stems, otherwise just the usual waterfowl and gulls.

Nels Hide

The marsh as largely dried up, although the remaining shallow pools in front of the hide suit the waders.

Dunlin and Ringed Plover dotted around, masses of Black Tailed Godwits, plus the highly territorial Avocets which chase the godwits away with vigour when they stray too close.

Hesketh Road

5 Little Egrets and 1 Grey Heron, one of the Little Egrets looked big enough to be the "Great White", and had a neck like a garden hose, but also nape plumes.

1 drake Wigeon, 2 drake Shovelers and a couple of Gadwall are still around.

Several Small Tortoiseshell and Peacock butterflies along the roadside, with single Speckled Wood by Nels Hide.





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John Williams


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spent the whole day here with the company of mr john Doherty, 53 species seen.

a walk along the beach towards marshside produced a good mixture of waders...

dunlin
knot
redshank
ringed plover
grey plover
black tailed godwit
shelduck
skylarks, meadow pipits & linnets. at least 6 wheatears

nels hide..

no signs of the garganeys.
small numbers of..
gadwall
wigeon
shoveler
teal
pintail
tufted duck
30+ avocets
several black tailed godwits, dunlins & redshanks scattered around
at least 5 ruff
10 little egrets
6 reed warblers, 4 showing very well at one stage at junction pool screen.

sandgrousers hide..

1 common sandpiper, also seen from junction pool screen
1 Mediterranean gull, it moved around a lot and showed well on at least 4 occasions overhead
4 little egret
1 barnacle goose
black tailed godwits, dunlins, redshanks & avocets scattered around
1 sedge warbler
several whitethroats around
small numbers of swallows, sand martins, house martins & swifts

around sand plant..

at least 8 wheatears
20+ linnets & goldfinches

oddly no birds of prey confuse

1 hare & 1 weasel.

still a good day out & 2 lifers for john, glad you had a good day smile

-- Edited by steven burke on Saturday 4th of May 2013 11:28:42 PM

-- Edited by steven burke on Saturday 4th of May 2013 11:30:17 PM

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saburke


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Little Owl on Gravel Lane this morning

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A late post from Saturday 6th April. Approx 12.30 till 4pm ish.

Very active reserve. From Visotor Centre: plenty of Avocets, Black Tailed Godwits, A few Redshank, 2 Buzzards, 2 Little Egrets, alot of Black Headed Gulls, Lesser Black Backed Gulls, a few Duck species...none in any high numbers now incl Wigeon, Pintail, Teal and Tufted.

Nel's Hide: much the same as Visitor Centre minus Buzzards and Egrets. A mixed flock of approx 40 Golden Plover and 20 Lapwing. No sign of any Ruff or Greenland White Fronted Goose but whilst en route between hides, a single goose amongst the other species from viewing screen was a Greylag, due to its large size, thick neck and pink feet.

From the road that splits the 2 hides: Meadow Pipit, Skylark above, 1m 1f Stonechat, and a flock of small wader roughly ~200 doing their aerial acrobatics, probably Knot.

Not to be defeated by the Spoonbill (nobody saw it from the hides) I heard a road of its likely location mentioned and set off to find it. Sure enough after approx a mile following the reserve edge and driving through the estate, I ended up on the far side of the reserve, 4 other birders present and there was the Spoonbill in a ditch so I kept getting head and shoulders, then a bit of preening, but a Spoonbill none the less so well worth the effort. Also a few hundred Pink Footed Geese in the same area.

Mammals: a few Brown Hares knocking about the reserve.

-- Edited by Rob Creek on Thursday 11th of April 2013 12:15:06 AM

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I was probably passing and re-passing you, John, at Marshside this morning. Saw similar list to yours minus the Ruff cry and Little Grebe.

Only thing different was that I made my first visit to the end of the sand-haul road for the noon high tide, and was treated to the sight of several thousand Knot +/-Dunlin wheeling around as the tide advanced, as well as a nice group of approx 25 Grey Plover. Lots of Sanderling earlier on at the front edge of the Knot groups. No raptors about though.

It was a 9.3m tide and it didn't really advance onto the salt marsh, which suited me - one of the wardens was telling me you do have to be careful with the really big tides that come through channels which cover parts of the sand haul track.

Great to see the Wheatear in the sand works - spring dawdling along at last?

Paul


PS I'm afraid I wouldn't know an Argentatus Herring Gull if it nicked my sarnies!! smile

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Paul


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09.30-12.30

Old Sand Works

1 Wheatear, 6 Linnets plus lots of Meadow Pipits.

The adjacent saltmarsh held lots of displaying Skylarks, Meadow Pipits and Redshank, but no sign of hirundines or any raptors.

Sangrounders

Amongst the mass of noisy Black Headed Gulls were 49 Avocets, plus the usual Black Tailed Godwits, Teal etc.

Junction Pool

A pair of Little Grebes.

Nels Hide + Hesketh Road viewpoint

10 Avocets, 5 Snipe, 2 Ruff, 12 Dunlin and 6 Little Egrets.

8 Pintail plus lots of Teal and Shoveler stiil around, although only a few Wigeon remain.

10 Herring Gulls, 2 Great Black Backs and a huge 3rd winter "Argentatus" Herring Gull.

2 Cormorants were also here, with another on Sandgrounders, I can't recall seeing any here before, as far as I know the pools are too shallow for fish and dry up completely in summer?.



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John Williams


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8.00 - 12.30 today

Highlights

1 Greenland White Fronted Goose
2 Dark Bellied Brent Geese
all three originally seen on the outer marsh from Sandgrounders area before relocating onto the reserve
Female Hen Harrier
2 Wheatear
3 Chiffchaff
plenty of wildfowl including Pintail, Teal, Shoveler, Shelduck
600 Pink Footed Geese including 1 with neck collar
Single ringed Black Tail Godwit amongst the many seen
other waders including snipe, redshank, Ruff, Lapwing
7 sitings of Little Egret
Peregrine
40 Whooper Swans on the estuary

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Yes indeed!

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KEV BROWN wrote:


Numerous BT Godwits





Hi Kev, I assume these were Black-tailed Godwits? confuse

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Ian McKerchar (forum administrator and owner)


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Dawlish Drive End, 6pm ish:
1 Spoonbill
12+ Avocet
Numerous BT Godwits

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Spoonbill again present this a.m. along with lots of Avocets.
Cheers Ian

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With news that the Spoonbill had started to be seen occasionally I decided to give it another go. So off I popped this afternoon, Marshside only being 45 miles away from my house. A quick scan of the marsh from the Dawlish Drive side revealed the Spoonbill actively feeding but pretty distant. Two flights later & it was feeding just a few metres away in the nearest creek. This allowed me to get the digiscoped shots that I had come for & to get my best ever shots of Spoonbill in th UK. This immature bird showed exceptionally well for a long period & then flew off to a distant creek again. It is obviously doing a circuit of the creeks and if it is on these marshes it is pretty easy to spot from the side of the marsh that I was on. The only down side was that I had to shed my gloves to digiscope & I ended up with excruciating pain in my hands due to the cold, they didn't go numb they just hurt to the point of agony!!! I now sympathise totally with poor Ranulph Fiennes on his recent expedition as his suffering must have been another notch up & I don't know how he stood the pain!!

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Thursday 21st March on Tacho break.

Visitor Centre Hide. Vast numbers of Wigeon everywhere you looked (probably in the hundreds), Avocets in close view
(~25-30), Black Tailed Godwits (~20), flock of Skylark doing a tour of the marsh (~25), small flock of Meadow Pipits, 1 Redshank, few pairs of Gadwall, 2 Curlew flying round the reserve, a few Pintail and Teal, countless Black Headed Gulls, Lesser Black Backed Gulls present.

Nel's Hide. High number of Wigeon, some Pintail and Teal, probably ~100+ Golden Plover with a large flock of Lapwing. Avocet ~20-25, high number of Black Headed Gulls, 2 Geese at distance, dark hue plumage especially on rump giving a high contrast with the tail resembled Bean but bill was quite large and broad so probably Greylag Geese.
Gull of note bathing, large and was quite pale grey compared to Lesser Black Backed, it lifted up off the water a couple of times but legs were in shadow so can only put it down to Herring Gull.

Mute Swan, Mallard, Coot, Moorhen and a large flock of Starlings made up the numbers

-- Edited by Rob Creek on Saturday 23rd of March 2013 11:25:55 AM

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