MB

  All users of this forum, please ensure you familiarise yourselves with the sticky posts at the top of each forum; posts not conforming to these guidelines and requests will be deleted.

Members Login
Username 
 
Password 
    Remember Me  
Post Info TOPIC: BIRD BEHAVIOUR


Status: Offline
Posts: 1352
Date:
RE: BIRD BEHAVIOUR


I heard a Lesser Black-backed Gull calling over Ashton-in-Makerfield at 23:30ish last night... Seemed unusual.

__________________


Status: Offline
Posts: 1058
Date:

A friend of mine who is currently residing in the famous Strangeways motel [ anyone who remembers Mike Harding's folk song will know where I mean] mentioned in his last letter to me that a number of inmates had complained of being kept awake as birds were singing all night. He identified the birds as Robins with a number of Wrens thrown in as well which were singing all through the night due to the very large security lights surrounding the motel making the birds think that it was 24 hour daylight.biggrin.gif

__________________
Dave Thacker


Status: Offline
Posts: 1024
Date:

Many thanks for that info Simon and Phil. Looks like we might have a few insomniacs about - birds......and birders! wink.gifbiggrin.gif

Cheers,

Bill.

__________________
GREATER MANCHESTER NEEDS YOUR BIRD SIGHTINGS!


Status: Offline
Posts: 1946
Date:

Bill, we have a Robin singing through the night at the moment even in the rain its still at it.

__________________


Status: Offline
Posts: 838
Date:

Our local Blackbirds are singing right through the night too!!

Not unusual especially during the breeding season but light levels can have an effect on them singing, for example street lamps etc.



-- Edited by Phil Owen on Sunday 28th of March 2010 11:04:26 AM

__________________


Status: Offline
Posts: 1024
Date:

28th March.

A Robin was singing sing.gif in my Chadderton back garden at 2.15 am BST (1.15 am old time) this morning. I know that this species sings late into the evening and very early morning but not actually in the middle of the night! Maybe this is normal behaviour? confuse.gif Leaned out of the bedroom window to listen and another bird was singing back at it!biggrin.gif

Cheers,

Bill.

__________________
GREATER MANCHESTER NEEDS YOUR BIRD SIGHTINGS!


Status: Offline
Posts: 393
Date:

Hi Paul, have spotted buzzards and badgers taking worms like you say but i was just amazed to see a top predater behaving in this manor. one of the pair were at it again tonight this time perching on the crossbar in pouring rain and then every minute or so dropping down to feed . a magpie was sat watching 3 feet further along the bar, i guess you could call it a cross bar challenge .biggrin.gif

__________________


Status: Offline
Posts: 463
Date:

Dave Tennant wrote:

A pair of kestrels hunting a round hindley town football pitch 6 pm till 630, nothing unusual there. one hunted over some long grass at the side of the pitch while the other used the changing room roof as a perch and for at least half an hour swooped onto the flooded pitch landed and seemed to be picking worms from the mud.could there be a shortage of larger prey?.






Hi Dave, Earthworms are supposedly rich in protein,(well at least according to Ray Mears) many larger birds including Buzzards and Herons activly hunt them out, Foxes and Badgers do so too, I imagine it was taking advantage of easy prey on a wet day.

__________________


Status: Offline
Posts: 1844
Date:

Dave Thacker wrote:



Getting a meal from carrion is a lot easier especially from road kill and I have seen Buzzards in the road feeding on Hedgehogs, Grey squirrels and Rabbits.hungry.gifsmile.gif







I regularly see Buzzards on or adjacent to the railway lines, feeding on, or waiting for "rail kills". It is not uncommon to see 20+ birds on a return trip to Chester via Delamere or 15+ on a return trip to Crewe via Alderley Edge.

Over the last 10 years or so , they have become far more common and are now seen around Manchester Airport, Romiley to Strines and on the Hadfield line.

Unfortunately, is is also becoming more common to find Buzzards as "rail kills", but I suppose its all relative because they become food for foxes, other Buzzards etc........

__________________


Status: Offline
Posts: 393
Date:

A pair of kestrels hunting a round hindley town football pitch 6 pm till 630, nothing unusual there. one hunted over some long grass at the side of the pitch while the other used the changing room roof as a perch and for at least half an hour swooped onto the flooded pitch landed and seemed to be picking worms from the mud.could there be a shortage of larger prey?.

__________________


Status: Offline
Posts: 1058
Date:

Hi Geoff and Mel

I have witnessed Buzzards chasing and catching Rabbits on the mosses over the years. I have also seen them chase Hares but never catch them. Sometimes Buzzards will sit on a post and watch for small rodents and I have seen them hopping around a field chasing and catching the rodents.

Getting a meal from carrion is a lot easier especially from road kill and I have seen Buzzards in the road feeding on Hedgehogs, Grey squirrels and Rabbits.hungry.gifsmile.gif

__________________
Dave Thacker


Status: Offline
Posts: 312
Date:

Geoff Hargreaves wrote:

Do buzzards take live prey ??




Although l've never seen them hunting myself Geoff, l always presumed they preferred live prey to carrion.

Did you not see the article on the Buzzard that took the Phalarope last year ?

__________________


Status: Offline
Posts: 1467
Date:

Whilst chasing the elusive merlin and racking up some borough ticks I bumped into mr thorpe and woosey at rindle rd we saw a buzzard swoop down from a fence post and land almost on top of a 'live' rabbit neither seemed to know what to do next,the rabbit hopped off stage right,the buzzard back to a fence post.Do buzzards take live prey ??

cheers geoffbiggrin.gif

__________________
Parish Listing,dare you


Status: Offline
Posts: 2037
Date:

See last post
Amazing , Craig but this weekend at Radcliffe recycling centre on Cemetary Rd I heard exactly the same call from a Magpie, I actually thought at the time it might be a call advertising a potential nest sight as it was so unusual.
Cheers Ian

__________________


Status: Offline
Posts: 1073
Date:

Whilst out and about today (out of county mostly) I was intrigued to hear a flock of starlings chortling away in a block of low scrub. It was hardly typical starling habitat, and more confusingly I couldnt see any of them. I then realised it was a Magpie, happily sat there mimicing a flock of starlings. I know Magpies are mimics but I've never heard them (or any other bird) mimic a flock of birds.

More bizarrely - I also saw my first young bird of the year - a young Moorhen (and I mean young - 10-11 days or so) on the River Sankey in Warrington!!

__________________
No one on their death bed ever said they wished they'd spent more time at work. http://bitsnbirds.blogspot.co.uk


Status: Offline
Posts: 1024
Date:

I'm sure that the botanists amongst the users of the forum will have noticed that earlier in the year there seemed to be a mass, widespread flowering of Cordyline species.
More info on this plant species at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cabbage_tree_(New_Zealand)

I assume this mass flowering might have been as a result of a relatively dry '08-09 winter? I understand that these plants are non-native species and originate from New Zealand I think? Anyway, the flowering spikes from earlier on in the year are now loaded with numerous small white berrries. Have noticed that my local Chadderton Starlings appear to have taken a liking to these small berries and a great cloud of birds descended onto the tree in next doors garden on 11/11 and enthusiastically picked off these berries. Had a look through my Birds of the Western Palearctic interactive to see if this had been reported as a food source before and couldn't see it mentioned. From my limited experience I have noticed that Cordylines don't flower in this country in the vast majority of years, so maybe it is just Starlings taking advantage of this years unusual circumstances? I wonder if Starlings in New Zealand (which were introduced there in the 1800s I understand) feed on this food source in this plants native country?

Bill.

__________________
GREATER MANCHESTER NEEDS YOUR BIRD SIGHTINGS!


Status: Offline
Posts: 1024
Date:

Joey Eccles wrote:

When at Chesire Oaks today i noticed that the resident population of starlings were being severly harassed by the black headed gulls. The gulls would gang up in groups of 3 or 4 and fly really fast at the trees in which the starlings were sited. This of course sent the starlings up and flying about. The gulls would then try to isolate a victim before trying to chase it down. They weren't very sucessful but on one occasion a gull did knock a starling out of the air only for it to regather its bearings and fly to a nearby tree when it was only a couple of feet from the ground. The gulls seemed so energetic and surprisingly fast and agile that at first i thought they were birds of prey. Yet it left me wondering why they did it? Maybe to try and oust the starlings from feeding in the gulls' spot? or possibly it was their predatory nature kicking in as with other gulls, although a starling would put up quite a scrap for a sparrowhawk let alone a bh gull!
Has anyone experienced this before?






Hi Joey,

Much as many of us might like to think that wildlife doesn't have some of the less savoury behavioural traits that we humans have..... well I'm afraid to say that they do! From my limited experience, of the commoner day to day birds, Black-headed Gulls are probably one of the worst "offenders" when it comes to trying to "mug" other birds and steal their hard earned food! I wonder if this is maybe what might have been happening with your Starlings and gulls? I have seen at Piethorne foraging and diving parties of Goosanders moving across the surfaces of the valleys reservoirs and quite often they are surrounded by a posse of yapping, threatening BH Gulls and I have watched them trying to steal food from these ducks. Also, at the same site I have seen opportunistic BH Gulls attempting the same with Great Crested Grebes (unsuccessfully) and Little Grebes (successfully). I have also watched them in very agile and aggressive aerial pursuit of Common Gulls and Jackdaws at Kingsway Business Park, also attempting to steal food - I would guess usually by getting the threatened bird to drop their food at the sheer thought of any attempted aggression! Whilst walking along my local section of the Rochdale Canal on Saturday 7th November 2009, I could hear the sharp alarm calls of a Kingfisher and about 15 Black-headed Gulls were swooping down low over the canal - I would guess trying to scare it into dropping a small fish that it had probably spent a good while waiting to catch! Can't claim to be an expert on these matters but I'm sure I have read somewhere that some species, such as Lapwing and Golden Plover, feed at certain times of the year at night time... possibly to avoid the close attentions of these unwelcome food pirates!

Best wishes,

Bill.


__________________
GREATER MANCHESTER NEEDS YOUR BIRD SIGHTINGS!


Status: Offline
Posts: 319
Date:

When at Chesire Oaks today i noticed that the resident population of starlings were being severly harassed by the black headed gulls. The gulls would gang up in groups of 3 or 4 and fly really fast at the trees in which the starlings were sited. This of course sent the starlings up and flying about. The gulls would then try to isolate a victim before trying to chase it down. They weren't very sucessful but on one occasion a gull did knock a starling out of the air only for it to regather its bearings and fly to a nearby tree when it was only a couple of feet from the ground. The gulls seemed so energetic and surprisingly fast and agile that at first i thought they were birds of prey. Yet it left me wondering why they did it? Maybe to try and oust the starlings from feeding in the gulls' spot? or possibly it was their predatory nature kicking in as with other gulls, although a starling would put up quite a scrap for a sparrowhawk let alone a bh gull!
Has anyone experienced this before?

__________________


Status: Offline
Posts: 1596
Date:

I heard they bred there, or tried to.

__________________
Judith Smith __________________________________ Lightshaw hall Flash is sacrosanct - NO paths please!


Status: Offline
Posts: 393
Date:

While picking up my son who had been playing football at the jjb soccerdome on friday evening, i noticed a kestrel sat on top of one of the lamp posts, it was dark but the grass verge below was lit up by the line of lamp posts. I saw this a couple of years ago and had forgotten about it . pressume the kestrel was using the lights to spot prey, is this regular behavior and has anyone spotted a similar thing. Ps this occured at wigan jjb.

__________________


Status: Offline
Posts: 1352
Date:

Rob Thorpe wrote:




Being stuck at Penni Flash is enough to drive anyone mad!

-- Edited by Rob Thorpe on Sunday 27th of September 2009 07:32:51 PM




more likely he had the dreaded leg lurgy from pearsons flashspin.gifbiggrin.gif



Touché wink.gif

__________________


Status: Offline
Posts: 2865
Date:

Rob Thorpe wrote:

JOHN TYMON wrote:

Rob Thorpe wrote:

John, maybe it's trying to swim but only has one leg wink.gif





couldn't haveconfuse.gifit changed its spinning direction twicebiggrin.gifthink it thought it was a phalaropebiggrin.gif



Being stuck at Penni Flash is enough to drive anyone mad!

-- Edited by Rob Thorpe on Sunday 27th of September 2009 07:32:51 PM




more likely he had the dreaded leg lurgy from pearsons flashspin.gifbiggrin.gif

__________________
http://www.flickr.com/photos/johntymon/


Status: Offline
Posts: 1352
Date:

JOHN TYMON wrote:

Rob Thorpe wrote:

John, maybe it's trying to swim but only has one leg wink.gif





couldn't haveconfuse.gifit changed its spinning direction twicebiggrin.gifthink it thought it was a phalaropebiggrin.gif



Being stuck at Penni Flash is enough to drive anyone mad!

-- Edited by Rob Thorpe on Sunday 27th of September 2009 07:32:51 PM

__________________


Status: Offline
Posts: 2865
Date:

Rob Thorpe wrote:

John, maybe it's trying to swim but only has one leg wink.gif





couldn't haveconfuse.gifit changed its spinning direction twicebiggrin.gifthink it thought it was a phalaropebiggrin.gif

__________________
http://www.flickr.com/photos/johntymon/


Status: Offline
Posts: 1352
Date:

John, maybe it's trying to swim but only has one leg wink.gif

__________________


Status: Offline
Posts: 2865
Date:

smile.gifhad a funny one at penny today,from horrocks hide was counting the pochard,and noticed a manic tufted duck behind them,it was spinning like a topspin.gifspin::confuse.gif for an hour none stop,it was making me and john lyons dizzy just lookin at it,i though it was cought some way,fishing line etc,but another duck fired out of the reeds,obviously having had enough of this wirling dirvish!!it swam off about 20 yards further on as though there was nowt wrong with itconfuse.gifthen it started spinning again in the opposite directionspin.gifspin.gifrofl.gif Anyone else seen this nutter rofl.gif



__________________
http://www.flickr.com/photos/johntymon/


Status: Offline
Posts: 1352
Date:

Geoff Hargreaves wrote:

I,ve got a 30ft rowan tree in the garden that has produced a very abundant crop of berries this year ,and I,d like to fence it of till waxwing seasonbiggrin.gifbiggrin.gif but it seems a daunting task,meanwhile the local starlings are having a bean feast and have stripped the the top 3rd of the berries leaving the ground covered in rejects and mishaps.It,s not happened in the last 15 years and I just find it interesting.

cheers geoff





Geoff, as it happens I was watching some young starlings eating (or more like not-eating) berries the other day (in St Helens (out of county no.gif)) and they seemed to drop about 90% of them on the floor! The starlings where in the tree and plucking the berries off, but while they then went on to eat some of them, most of them just fell out of their bill/beak/whatever. It seemed to me like they were dropping them out of clumsiness, but maybe there's some other reason, but either way what a waste! I too was thinking of the poor hungry waxwings wink.gif

__________________


Status: Offline
Posts: 1467
Date:

I,ve got a 30ft rowan tree in the garden that has produced a very abundant crop of berries this year ,and I,d like to fence it of till waxwing seasonbiggrin.gifbiggrin.gif but it seems a daunting task,meanwhile the local starlings are having a bean feast and have stripped the the top 3rd of the berries leaving the ground covered in rejects and mishaps.It,s not happened in the last 15 years and I just find it interesting.

cheers geoff

__________________
Parish Listing,dare you


Status: Offline
Posts: 1844
Date:

I have just been watching 3 Jay's(Adult and 2 juvs) on the path outside my house. The adult was "anting" (spreading its tail and wings out on the ground) and eating any insects that had climbed aboard!

The adult bird then started to lie almost flat infront of the juvs and then jumped up and pecked at them until they copied. The adult then even started to pick off any insects they had picked up. Eventually, the juvs got the idea and started to do it for themselves.

They continued doing this for 20 minutes until they were flushed by a dog walker.blankstare.gif

I went out and had a look in the area where the Jays were, and it was teeming with ants!smile.gif

So I presume that the "anting" behaviour has to be learnt as opposed to a natural instinct?

__________________


Status: Offline
Posts: 1058
Date:

As I walked passed the car park behind Swinton Town Hall this afternoon I watched one of a pair of Crows pick up a small stone from the grass and then while flying up over the car park it dropped it from about 50`. The Crow repeated this twice and it also tried to pick up a larger piece of stone but could not get its beak around it to lift it up.

I would be interested to find out if the bird repeats this little trick when the car park is full or when Labour MP for Salford Hazel Blearsbleh.gif puts in an appearancebiggrin.gif

__________________
Dave Thacker


Status: Offline
Posts: 2865
Date:

Judith Smith wrote:

This is quite well-known, John. I think it's to aid digestion of nasty fish bones, scales etc in tiny tummies! I saved your shot of it.





cheers judith,ive seen em eating tiny feathers but that was quite a size ,or was it just a tiny chick,that made the feather look bigsmile.gif

__________________
http://www.flickr.com/photos/johntymon/


Status: Offline
Posts: 200
Date:


buzzard strikes again!
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/cornwall/8158022.stm?lsf
twice in a week!

__________________


Status: Offline
Posts: 1596
Date:

This is quite well-known, John. I think it's to aid digestion of nasty fish bones, scales etc in tiny tummies! I saved your shot of it.

__________________
Judith Smith __________________________________ Lightshaw hall Flash is sacrosanct - NO paths please!


Status: Offline
Posts: 2865
Date:

saw something today ,i don't remember seeing before,a adult great crested feedingconfuse.gifits newly hatched chick with 6 inch feathers ,moulted from the ducksconfuse.gifdon't think they would be very appertisingsmile.gif

__________________
http://www.flickr.com/photos/johntymon/


Status: Offline
Posts: 200
Date:

buzzard attacks jogger, thats gotta hurt!
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/cornwall/8156734.stm

__________________


Status: Offline
Posts: 1712
Date:

I had heard that Ringed Plovers, in common with other Plovers when sensing a threat to their nest or chicks feign a broken wing to lead potential predators away. Saw this at Gronant yesterday when walking along the beach below the shingle - didn't realise that we had come a little close to a chick and the adult did the broken wing routine - an interesting ploy.

__________________


Status: Offline
Posts: 121
Date:

They were in Levenshulme High School grounds (M19 1FS). I even managed to get a couple of the pupils interested to watch them for a few minutes before they went home. They had never heard of jays! They did know what snails were and they knew what magpies were, so at least we had a starting point.

__________________


Status: Offline
Posts: 1596
Date:

That's very interesting behaviour, Debs - what was the location?

__________________
Judith Smith __________________________________ Lightshaw hall Flash is sacrosanct - NO paths please!


Status: Offline
Posts: 121
Date:

Was watching 3 jays at work yesterday collecting snails, flying up into a tree and dropping them to crack their shells before eating them.

__________________


Status: Offline
Posts: 1596
Date:

Yes, but it's unusual. I think it was Hindley Green pond (not Westlake) where this happened, like you I was feeding cyggies. Years ago though.

__________________
Judith Smith __________________________________ Lightshaw hall Flash is sacrosanct - NO paths please!


Status: Offline
Posts: 1352
Date:

The other day, while throwing bread to Black-headed Gulls (was supposed to be feeding cygnets but they were too busy sleeping), a Common Tern scooped up a piece of bread from the water, then fed it to it's young. Has anyone else ever witnessed a tern "coming to bread"?

__________________


Status: Offline
Posts: 1073
Date:

Strange one tonight at Virridor - a small passerine (looked finch like) chasing a swift for a good few hundred yards - low down, over tree tops everywhere. It was literally touching the swift's tail. Now, I cant think of one single reason why anything other than a predator would be chasing a swift, let alone a bird like a finch spp which must have expended a serious amount of energy on a pretty fruitless excercise.

__________________
No one on their death bed ever said they wished they'd spent more time at work. http://bitsnbirds.blogspot.co.uk


Status: Offline
Posts: 2865
Date:

Rob Thorpe wrote:

Yesterday I was watching a Coot (obviously i have nothing better to do with my time) on the canal at the Wigan Flashes. The Coot was swimming in the water, as they do, but it was plucking and eating Bramble leaves from the canal bank. It would reach up and pluck a whole leaf from the Bramble, then eat it. Is this normal behaviour?





If its owt like our fruit bushes at the moment,it would be gettin about 3000 aphids per leafbiggrin.gifbetter than picken em off one at a timeconfuse.gifclever cootsmile.gif

__________________
http://www.flickr.com/photos/johntymon/


Status: Offline
Posts: 319
Date:

i saw a coot eating vegetation as well. dogs eat grass so they can regurgitate food - maybe this has something to do with that?

__________________


Status: Offline
Posts: 1352
Date:

Yesterday I was watching a Coot (obviously i have nothing better to do with my time) on the canal at the Wigan Flashes. The Coot was swimming in the water, as they do, but it was plucking and eating Bramble leaves from the canal bank. It would reach up and pluck a whole leaf from the Bramble, then eat it. Is this normal behaviour?

__________________


Status: Offline
Posts: 2253
Date:

Dave Tennant wrote:

Male whitethroat displaying [ flying up to about 12 feet and then swooping all the time chattering away,repeated several times ].old railway line amberswood 6am .Just looked it up in my collins field guide to birds of britain and europe and it describes it as a " brief dancing song flight ".made my day thatbiggrin.gif







Simon Barnes once wrote in his Saturday column in The Times that these singing male Whitethroats were the "boy-racers" of the bird-world. His analogy was that their impressive displays must, as well as impressing us humans, bring them to the attention of Sparrowhawks, etc. Their pre-occupation with attracting willing young females takes precedence over any thoughts to the obvious risks.

__________________


Status: Offline
Posts: 393
Date:

Male whitethroat displaying [ flying up to about 12 feet and then swooping all the time chattering away,repeated several times ].old railway line amberswood 6am .Just looked it up in my collins field guide to birds of britain and europe and it describes it as a " brief dancing song flight ".made my day thatbiggrin.gif

__________________


Status: Offline
Posts: 1352
Date:

Judith Smith wrote:

We must hope and pray LBBs don't take to nesting at Horrocks or they will decimate the tern and BH gull chicks. But from their behaviour over the last few years, there and in the town centre, it's looking more and more likely. They are already nesting at Belmont.





There's been a pair hanging around on the islands on Horrocks' for sometime now, and they are still loafing in good numbers on Scotman's, although i do believe they can travel some distance from a breeding colony to feed.

__________________


Status: Offline
Posts: 1596
Date:

They behave like that when they see a Mink i.e. a potential predator. We must hope and pray LBBs don't take to nesting at Horrocks or they will decimate the tern and BH gull chicks. But from their behaviour over the last few years, there and in the town centre, it's looking more and more likely. They are already nesting at Belmont.

__________________
Judith Smith __________________________________ Lightshaw hall Flash is sacrosanct - NO paths please!


Status: Offline
Posts: 1352
Date:

At Scotman's Flash on friday there were 2 Lesser Black-backed Gulls having a bit of a scuffle in the water. For some reason, all the Black-headed Gulls that were present took to the air and formed a flock which hovered over the fighting LBB Gulls. Not sure what the BH Gulls were hoping to acheive from this, maybe they were waiting to devour the loser???confuse.gif

__________________
«First  <  1 2 3 4 5  >  Last»  | Page of 5  sorted by
Quick Reply

Please log in to post quick replies.

RODIS

 

This forum is dedicated to the memory of Eva Janice McKerchar; rest in peace mum.