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Post Info TOPIC: Spurn


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RE: Spurn


Yeah, I thought the same when I read your post, sorry we didn't bump into each other. It was a wee bit hectic though wasn't it?! So much about and we only had from about 10am-4.30pm to see it all smile We set off at 5am, so getting there at 10am was terrible, but so was the traffic!! Great fun though, hope to see you for a chat & more great birds next time Craig smile

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Somehow contrived to miss you (and the other Manchester Birders) Paul. Shame as it would have been nice o catch up.

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Had a trip to Spurn arranged for Thursday with a mate so it was a bonus when the Isabelline Shrike turned up & when there had been a bit of a fall. Pretty much the same mix of birds as Craig mentions, and also missed the same ones too hmm

Arriving pretty early after an early satrt but heavy traffic around Manchester, Leeds and through Hull (furious) included the Isabelline Shrike, 2 Rough-legged Buzzards at least 3 times, a Hoopoe, Yellow-browed Warbler, Great Grey Shrikes, 2 Black Redstarts, 2 Woodlarks, 2 Bramblings, several Common Redstarts, innumerable Goldcrests, including many hopping about on lawns and coming up from alomost under out feet, Redwings everywhere and a Fieldfare (my first of both of those species this autumn.

A cracking day rounded off with fish & chips and also nice to see & chat to Simon Warford, Simon Johnson, Dave Hughston & John Barber smile

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Brilliant few days at the Obs included all the best bits about birding - falls of migrants, rarities, viz migging and all shared with some great company. We arrived early Weds morning and it was immediately obvious there were lots of birds around. Not as many as the previous day but still enough to get the hopes up. The was a huge number of goldcrests - not the most I've seen there but still so many there seemed to be several in every bush. Plenty redwings and blackbirds were also around and there were reports of lingering great grey shrikes, a hoopoe and several yellow-browed warblers. The details of everything that has been recorded there are all on the Spurn Bird Observatory website. Trip List for me (in no particular order): Whooper Swan, Pink-footed Goose, Greylag Goose, Brent Goose, Velvet Scoter, Common Scoter, Eider, Wigeon, Teal, Mallard, Gannet, Kittiwake, Great Black-Backed Gull, Herring Gull, Black Headed Gull, Gannet, Little Egret, Water Rail, Common Snipe, usual Estuary waders, ROUGH-LEGGED BUZZARD, Merlin, Peregrine Falcon, Sparrowhawk, GREAT GREY SHRIKE (up to 5 present and 2 visible in the same scope view at once) ISABELLINE SHRIKE, Stonechat, Redstart, Black Redstart (up to 3 I think), Barred Warbler (didn't see) Firecrest (didn't see) Willow Warbler, Chiffchaff, Blackcap, YELLOW-BROWED WARBLER (4-5) RADDES WARBLER (Didn't see), HOOPOE (down to 6-7metres) Goldfinch, Chaffinch, Rock Pipit, Meadow Pipit, Tree Pipit, Twite, Skylark, Swallow, House Martin, PALLID SWIFT (missed
cry) ROSE-COLOURED STARLING (Missed cry) Tree Sparrow (1600+ south this morning) Woodcock, Redwing, Mistle Thrush, Blackbird, Song Thrush, Starling, House Sparrow, Linnet, Yellowhammer etc etc.

Bit gutted about missing the Pallid Swift and the Rose-coloured Starling, but hey ho.

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.... the Mugamaki Flycatcher of a few years ago.

You were luckier than me Andy. I set out from Hazel Grove with Mr Passant but we had to call for petrol en route - and that cost us!

Parked up and I remember quite a long walk in, passing lots of happy, smiling faces leaving the site. One of them uttered the fateful words, "No need to rush mate, it's showing well". It wasn't!

It had just moved deeper into the wood seconds before we arrived and, whilst we were wondering what to do next, Steve Gantlett emerged through the trees. He was the last person to see it as far as I know.

I even went back again the next morning at dawn and stood for some hours in the rain hmm

My only consolation? It was never accepted onto the British list smile

Cheers John

Edit: Actually it is still in the holding category D. So eventually it should be assigned to either A or E.

-- Edited by John Rayner on Wednesday 15th of October 2014 06:01:09 PM

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(co finder of the Mugamaki Flycatcher a few years ago)

1991! I bet we all wish that was just a few years ago!!
That brings back great memories of me (age 14) calling birdline northeast (sorry if those new to birding have no idea what im talking about there!) and then very quickly with my brother setting off in thick fog to see a bird, without, if i'm honest neither of us at the time knowing what it would look like.
Arrived on site to find just 3 other birders (think Mick Turton and John hewitt were 2 of them) and then seeing the bird still in thick fog chasing round the treetops and actively feeding as only truly wild birds can!.
Cracking autumn arrival (as is going on over there right noe) and you really can't beat being there when the birds are turning up and masses of common migrants are at your feet and even stopping traffic at some points!!

well, day off tomorrow but due to other commitments have to make do with a few hours round Pennington looking for a scarce passerine, or two.

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Originally posted by Dave Ousey today:

Early October and its Spurn time again! Our dear wives look forward to it just as much as we do, I think. After all the exciting few weeks that we have had recently at Spurn, we thought that with the weather, not appearing to be very good for migrants, that it could be quiet, correct! Caravan booked at the excellent Sandy Beaches and with all our supplies myself, Bob K & Steve K set off at 6am with Bob at the wheel. First stop was Stone Creek to meet John Hewitt (co finder of the Mugamaki Flycatcher a few years ago) He always keeps us up to date with the passing birds from this area. His dedication to this area has to be admired and his knowledge of the quantity of birds is second to none. After a nice 30 minutes with John we usually walk up to Stone Creek Battery to see what we can find but, with the tide in, we headed to Patrington Haven to see what we could find. In the fields on the way we saw a small party of Red legged Partridge & a single Grey Partridge. On the walk up to the Haven (of last years long staying Ivory Gull fame) we saw two Marsh Harriers hunting the area. Lots of the more common waders, ducks & geese were seen. A Yellow browed Warbler had been reported at Easington Gas Terminal so off we headed. A few dudes where looking for the bird, but no joy, a few Wheatears seen and the sea was very quiet. There followed a walk in from the north to Easington Lagoons, yes its a long way, and with all the waters having been flooded by the tidal surges, no waders were seen at all. 362 Brent Geese, 5 Pink footed Geese where the highlight. We were joined by Billy from Middlesborough who told us about his recent trip to Japan, what a place that is! We had a look around Kilnsea, Crown & Anchor and Canal Scrape (with a silent C) the birding was very slow. Then lots of Swallows were seen in the last 2 hours of daylight and a single Whinchat. At the caravan we enjoyed a hearty meal of Goulash and then headed for the club along with Martin Q, Steve & Chris B. Saturday morning and a check of the birds on the Humber with lots of the more common waders but, alas, no Curlew Sandpiper. A Firecrest was eventually seen well at Pancho`s Pond, Kilnsea then a Yellow browed Warbler near the Crown & Anchor. After breakfast we checked out the sea and the Warren area and had a walk up to the area that the sea had washed away last winter. A smart Merlin was the only bird of note apart from uncountable waders on the Humber, very spectacular. It makes the area from the old narrows to the point an island 2 hours before & after high tide. No vehicles are allowed beyond the Warren, so, if a rare bird is found a long walk will be required. A call from Martin Q alerted us that a Barred Warbler was showing well at the silent C canal scrape. At twitch speed (only to check our response time out really) we got to the hide and within 10 minutes were enjoying distant views of the Barred Warbler, nice one Martin. We then headed for the Sandy Beaches clubhouse to watch Wigan v St Helens grand final. A couple of punches from an irate Wigan player and after lots of disappointing finals the championship was heading to St Helens! At the Crown & Anchor we entered the quiz and after loaning one of our number out to an opposing team, we enjoyed a good laugh. Steve & Mandy R from Rossendale also joined us. After being beaten by one point we headed back to the club for a nightcap. Sunday morning started very misty and a trip to Sammy!s Point was arranged. Next to no birds were seen there, I cannot remember it so empty. After a brew & a meal we broke camp and headed for home. Despite the lack of anything rare we all had enjoyed ourselves in excellent sunny conditions and will all be back next year.

Dave O.

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Ian McKerchar (forum administrator and owner)


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Hi all,

Just a shout, anybody going to Spurn for the shrike from Manchester maybe this weekend (if it's still there!), would anyone consider taking along an extra passenger, I'd be happy to share fuel costs?

Please PM me if you're going and wouldn't mind the extra birder along?
Cheers
Tanmay

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Excellent work their Steve, especially adding to the already good list, some more good birds!
We need to get one of those sea-watch scopes they had, that enabled them to see a Goldcrest in Holland from the hide!

And Doc...we also saw the blush area around the flank of the Masked Shrike. I remember mentioning it to Steve. A cracking bird!

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after robs big list I am going to keep this as brief as I can wink
spent a few days at spurn arriving Saturday afternoon, returning home Monday evening, I actually stayed in withernsea. an enjoyable day with rob creek on sunday, glad you enjoyed yourself. I myself bagged 93 species over the 3 days but bagged 84 species on Monday, all birds seen. 6 lifers for me...

masked shrike, best views were on Monday when I managed some ok pics.
barred warbler, red breasted flycatcher, yellow browed warbler, excellent views of these birds.
sooty shearwater & pomarine skua, thanks to the sea watchers for these birds biggrin

the rest of the birds are pretty much mentioned by rob but can add brent goose, tree pipit, Mediterranean gull, hobby, bonxie, red throated diver, common scoter. birds I actually did not see were.. olive-backed pipit, hen harrier, wood warbler & great grey shrike.

an excellent trip & several other Manchester birders seen throughout my visit.


smilesmile

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sid ashton wrote:

Doc Brewster wrote:

................. One nice difference from the Scottish bird was a patch of peach colour on one of its rear flanks (funny that it was only on one side!?).


It took me some time to pick up that peach coloured patch Paul since from where I was standing the bird kept facing left with the patch hidden from my view. It seemed to be its favourite position and in the majority of photographs I have seen it seems to be doing just that, facing leftbiggrin



Totally agree Sid, every single photograph I have of it is of the 'wrong' side, so not one of these shows that gorgeous rear-flank colouration! Sods Law methinks smile

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Sunday 7.50am - 6.30pm in the quality company of Steve Burke.

(Also good to put a face to the name of Austin Morley...nice to meet you and Alan)

A fantastic day that produced 5 Lifers, 10 Waders, 6 Gulls, a Flycatcher trio, a whole host of quality migrants and a total of 82 Bird species for me along with 4 Mammal species to boot!

-Barred Warbler - LIFER
(Worth the wait for this sighting)
-Masked Shrike - LIFER
(Good job locating this one Steve)
-Red Breasted Flycatcher 1 LIFER
(A gorgeous bird this one)
-Sooty Shearwater - LIFER
(Thanks to the sea watchers for this one)
-Garden Warbler - 3 LIFER
(Again nice one Steve, 2 in migrant hedge, 1 close up at Canal Scrape)

...Alot of these migrants were seen together in one location
-Pied Flycatcher -2
-Spotted Flycatcher -4/5
-Redstart -approx 8/9
-Whinchat -approx 12+ seemed to be everywhere
-Stonechat -3
-Wheatear -approx 4/5
-Blackcap -3
-Chiffchaff -2
-Whitethroat -1
-Goldcrest -1
-Redwing -1
-Mistle Thrush -2 together in a Hawthorn
-Song Thrush -1
-Skylark -approx 4/5
-Meadow Pipit -quite a few at various locations
-Pied Wagtail -only 2 that I saw
-Grey Wagtail -1 in yard opposite Cr&Anc
-Jack Snipe -2 (not seen these since I was a youngster)
-Common Snipe -1 constantly harassing the Jack's
-Dunlin -in large numbers
-Golden Plover -100/200
-Ringed Plover -many
-Redshank -quite a few knocking around
-Oystercatcher -quite a few far out
-Curlew -3
-Knot -3
-Turnstone -not counted, on the beach rocks in the company of a lone...
-Great Black-backed Gull
-Lesser Black-backed Gull -few patrolling around
-Herring Gull -not too many
-Common Gull
-Black-headed Gull -quite numerous
-Little Gull -not sure on numbers, out towards the rigs
-Guillemot -1 swimming off coast, 6 fly-pasts
-Gannet -1 juv off coast, 3/4 adults out
-Manx Shearwater -1 out towards rigs
-Cormorant -1 over near Canal scrape
-House Sparrow -good numbers around
-Tree Sparrow -various numbered small groups
-Linnet -good number knocking around
(Especially near Crown & Anchor and Wetlands Hide)
-Goldfinch
-Greenfinch
-Reed Bunting -maybe 5 or 6
-Chaffinch -not many, maybe 4
-Raven -1 over the car on approach to Cr&Anc
-Carrion Crow -good number around
-Jackdaw -quite a few over into the fields on approach
-Jay -1 flew over approach road near Cr&Anc
-Marsh Harrier -massive specimen patrolling the mud flats
-Common Buzzard -1
-Kestrel -approx 7/8
-Sparrowhawk -3
(1 of which was a quite large female hunting along the mud flats, a Goshawk was reported day before which turned out to be a very large female Sparrowhawk)
-Little Egret -approaching 15/20
-Grey Heron -1
-Shelduck -large numbers
-Teal -quite a few from Wetlands hide
-Pintail -2 female at Wetlands hide great spot Steve
-House Martin and Swallow -30/40 joint total

A lot of USUALS around including water birds and garden birds especially Robin.
Also Dunnock, Blackbird, Wren, Great Tit, Blue Tit, Coal Tit, Starling, Woodpigeon, Collared Dove, Magpie, Feral Pigeon, Mute Swan, Coot, Moorhen, and Mallard making up 81 bird species...

Also 4 Mammal species sighted including...
Plenty of Rabbit, a Grey Seal infront of Seawatch hide and a Field Vole heard loudly in the grass and just saw back of it, likely to be that as it was using a tunnel network in the grass above ground that is classic behaviour.

No.82 in the birds came in the form of a Grasshopper Warbler of some kind that had landed near the Olive-backed Pipit favoured location, we just knew it was a Locustella that came over the radio in the Seawatch hide. Steve and I had a walk over to see if we could see it but didn't hold out much hope in seeing a tiny bird in a large area of reed and marshy habitat. But to our horror people were pushing past us and jumping down into the location where it was seen to join an already formed sweeper line to flush it out. 3 times they did this with sticks and mono pods, me and Steve just looked at each other in dismay! The bird was flushed twice and the 3rd time it disappeared so they were unsuccessful.

Also this happened a little earlier walking past the masses trying for the Olive-backed Pipit, a couple of guys were in the low trench trying to flush it. A couple of birds did fly out, they were Meadow Pipits that I saw, so I dipped in the O-b-P.

It also happened whilst trying for the Firecrest and Wood Warbler at Kew Garden feeding station, just about to snap a close up Blackcap when someone walked through purposely to flush stuff to the other side of the hedge to waiting photographers!

First time at Spurn for me, won't be the last either, a beautiful wild place teaming with special species but I'm sorry...I'm afraid I didn't agree with flushing tactics just for a tick! For conservation purposes yes!
Will be back here soon.



-- Edited by Rob Creek on Tuesday 23rd of September 2014 09:18:58 PM

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Doc Brewster wrote:

................. One nice difference from the Scottish bird was a patch of peach colour on one of its rear flanks (funny that it was only on one side!?).


It took me some time to pick up that peach coloured patch Paul since from where I was standing the bird kept facing left with the patch hidden from my view. It seemed to be its favourite position and in the majority of photographs I have seen it seems to be doing just that, facing leftbiggrin

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Having seen the Kilrenny Masked Shrike in 2004, then a first for Britain, I hadn't planned any rushing over to Spurn to catch up with the latest one (third for Britain) but as I had previously arranged a trip over on Sunday this bird would be a big bonus! I stuck to previous timings and had a leisurely wake up and drive over, only arriving at 11am!

The viewing area off the road between the Blue Bell & Crown & Anchor was already rammed full, with more folk arriving all the time in states of mild panic at the prospect of a lifer, however by kneeling on the floor with my scope I was able to get cracking views of the shrike from the front of the crowd, and even managed a few reasonable digiscoped shots of it. The bird was feeding well, taking several Migrant Hawker dragonflies as I watched it at pretty close quarters. One nice difference from the Scottish bird was a patch of peach colour on one of its rear flanks (funny that it was only on one side!?). Nearby a Redstart (the first of many) and a Wood Warbler were seen feeding, and later we added Pied Flycatcher to complete the 'Oak Wood Three'!

Next we headed up the road and after a bit of a wait added a cracking Barred Warbler to the daylist, the battery on my camera running out scuppered any pictures of that one though! After lunch we caught up with a cute Red-breasted Flycatcher, on our third attempt that day for this species, I just love this species but still yearn to see one with a red breast smile Walking along the Canal Zone path we joined a large throng of birders looking for the Olive-backed Pipit, it had been seen to fly into a specific area so everyone stood back & waited. A short time later the reward was the bird popping out onto the path before flying distantly over the fields to land by the concrete pillboxes. What Dave says about that 2 second view to ID it, was applicable in this case too wink Wheatears, Stonechats & a Whinchat perched on the fences here in a mini Chat-fest.

A stroll to the seawatching hide for a short seawatch was productive with a couple of Sooty Shearwaters seen along with Litle Gulls, Gannets and a Red-throated Diver. On the drive to Sammy's Point we too stopped to take in the Peregrine by the road, showing fabulously a few yards away plucking its prey, which has been IDed on Facebook as a Kestrel eyepopping Can't confirm that ID though!! Sammy's Point was the only slight disappointment as a search for a Yellow-browed Warbler there failed as the weather closed in a bit. Willow Warbler, Goldcrest and Siskin were seen there though.

A cracking day but a search for a Fish & Chip shop that was open on Sundays failed miserably, despite calling in at least 7 towns/villages with chippies, but all were closed!! Any info on chippies near Spurn that open on Sundays would be greatly appreciated biggrin

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After last weeks 71 species and a hand full of "year ticks" we found ourselves going to Spurn again! The reason, a certain Masked Shrike that had been found on Saturday morning, the third recorded in Britain. We waited for news before "going over the hill" into Yorkshire and around 7am the bird had been found so, the 2 Steve's and myself were ready to go by 8am. Steve K kindly drove and by 10-15am we were drawing into the temporary car park in the Well Field to park and after passing at least 3 decent crowds of birders all watching something. Then, a dash to look into a field behind the Blue Bell cafe and the juvenile Masked Shrike was seen, a little distantly, so the 2 Steve's had a lifer in the bag. I had seen the Fife bird a few year's ago, what a journey into Scotland that was to see this small shrike species. Cracking bird to watch catching various insect prey and with 5 Redstart's for company it was really special. A Lesser Whitethroat in the same bush as the shrike was also a real smart bird. After a good look at the shrike we had a go for a Barred Warbler, a species that we have not had a lot of joy with lately. After meeting lots of our birding friends from past & present we got to a line of bushes near the "Crown & Anchor". After a good wait the bird failed to put in an appearance, we thought we would try again later. A Red breasted Flycatcher was showing well in the pub car park and so was the landlady, time to go. The canal area was next where an Olive backed Pipit had been seen, albeit rather fleetingly, as it was a lifer for Steve B. We waited for a while then went and saw a well hidden Jack Snipe, always easy to see when you know were they are! A small crowd was assembling near where the pipit had been last seen, so off we went again. One of the Spurn regulars was going to walk the area and attempt to flush this well known "skulker". After about 20 yards walking / flushing, a small pipit flew out and landed in a small bush for around 2 seconds, just allowing time to I.D. it (yes, I know what you are going to say) it then had another brief fly and promptly disappeared into the deep grass. We had a small seawatch and managed a Sooty Shearwater, much more success along the eastern coast in other places just made us have a look. Now for another go for the Barred Warbler, within 5 minutes the bird was performing admirably for around 10 minutes, cracking close up views. A juvenile Hen Harrier female was then picked up, as it hunted low over the mud in search of some food, lovely to watch. A few Wheatear, Whinchat, Pied and Spotted Flycatcher along with some common warblers were seen around the canal area. The place was full of migrant birds. Finally a juvenile Peregrine was plucking a small bird only 15 yards from the roadside, not at all bothered about us watching it! There can be few places in England better than Spurn to see lots of migrating birds in autumn. The crowds were well-behaved and a vote of thanks to all the Spurn organisers in making the day again, memorable. We reached Rochdale and home by 5-30pm another great day out! We managed about 57 species, 2 lifers for Steve B and 1 for Steve K and at least 5 year ticks each.

Dave O.

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And congratulations to forum member jonathon platt for finding the shrike.well done mate.

-- Edited by chrisdorney on Sunday 21st of September 2014 08:41:28 PM

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Not long back from an afternoon visit to Spurn, to look for the Masked Shrike. The bird was easily found through the scope from the canal area looking over to Rose Cottage but much closer views were had from the field next to the caravan park. This is only the third UK recorded sighting of the species and was great to see. Also present was a Great Grey Shrike and at one point had both Shrikes in my scope view at the same time. Other species seen in the gathering gloom were Red-breasted Flycatcher, Spotted Flycatcher, Wheatear and three Brent Geese flying up the estuary.

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My second visit to Spurn this month yesterday Wednesday the 16th, this time with long-time-no-see Richard Hargreaves, John Barber and Dave Hugeston. The weather was not kind to us with persistent mist all day, along with occasional periods of drizzle, preventing sea and estuary views. We spent some time looking for the Red-breasted Flycatcher for Dave's life list with no luck. As part of the search we headed off walking toward the Point crossing the washed out area of road as one had been reported close to the new refuge shelter. This shelter has been provided should people get stranded by the high tide. There are notices showing the tide times and heights so anyone thinking of walking to the Point should have a look at these.

During the day a good selection of species was noted including Firecrest, Redstart(several), Garden Warbler, Blackcap, Wryneck, Pied Flycatcher, Whinchat, Lesser and Common Whitethroat, Song Thrush (several), Chiffchaff, Tree Pipit and a lone Redwing. No sign for me of the reported Yellow browed Warbler in any of the locations where I have seen them in previous years. So apart from the weather and a long journey home we had a good day wink

-- Edited by sid ashton on Thursday 18th of September 2014 04:02:51 PM

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RE: Spurn. 14/9/2014


With a counter attraction on the Wirral of Cattle Egret, Red necked Phalarope & Pectoral Sandpiper, we put it to the vote and went to Spurn on the east coast. We thought there was more potential of something "rare" turning up and we were not disappointed. A full "A" team was assembled at a dark Newhey and Bob K kindly packed us all into his car. As the mists of the motorway began to clear it became a nice, warm day as we arrived in the Spurn area. Around 6 Whinchat were seen near Kilnsea Wetlands along with 2 Little Stints. At the seawatching hide, which was almost deserted as a Honey Buzzard was in the Easington area, we managed to see a few Arctic Skua's a single Sooty Shearwater and a Great Skua and a steady flow of more common seabirds e.g. Sandwich Tern, Common Scoter & Gannets. A trip to the Crown & Anchor carpark had us soon watching a very bright Yellow browed Warbler and a bird, which for me, was my bird of the day, a Wood Warbler, very well marked and not seen very much on autumn passage. We then walked the Canal triangle to see if we could get on the Corncrake that had been seen earlier, without any joy. The churchyard and Beacon Lane where visited without any new birds and then as lots more birders returned from the Easington area, we decided to try for the Honey Buzzard ourselves. A good look around revealed mainly Kestrel's and Wheatears, so back to Spurn. A showy Wryneck on "Sunny Beaches" caravan park was seen next, what a lovely bird and fairly close. Then a smart Great Grey Shrike was seen from the road in the canal triangle, it was seen chasing and catching bees and was great entertainment. A trip to Sammy's Point allowed us to watch an energetic Red breasted Flycatcher for a couple of minutes, then a tantalising glimpse of a large raptor, that promptly disappeared! A Redstart & more Whinchat's and one of our lads had 5 Curlew Sandpipers on the falling tide, they had gone when we left Sammy's, we also missed a Barred Warbler, you can't see all the birds. A call at the Canal Scrape and at Kilnsea Wetlands was our last birding of the day. A bird filled trip that will be remembered as, "one of those days at Spurn". We reached home around 5-45pm with news of a Great White Egret on one of our local reservoirs in Rossendale ummm should I go?

Dave Ousey.

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Spurn


Great day out at Spurn today, 66 species seen.

Highlights included:
Red-breasted flycatcher
Great grey shrike
Firecrest
Wryneck
Ring ouzel
Redstart
Wood warbler
Pied flycatcher
Yellow wagtail
Whinchat
Siskin
Greenshank
Curlew sandpiper
Bar-tailed godwit.

Plus a weasel right up a tree chasing great tits (without any luck)

-- Edited by Holly Page on Monday 15th of September 2014 09:40:08 PM

-- Edited by Holly Page on Monday 15th of September 2014 09:41:00 PM

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Cracking day at Spurn today between 08.15-17.30. Not a huge fall but lots of quality birds still plenty of commoner migrants.

My sightings highlights were:

1 Common Rosefinch - lifer biggrin and found be me! Seen by one other person. Despite reporting it it didn't feature on the spurn sightings web page. Oh well!
1 Red Breasted Flycatcher
1 Wryneck
1 Great Grey Shrike
1 (possibly 2) Barred Warbler
1 Yellow-browed Warbler
2 Sooty Shearwater - my find and this did feature on the sightings page!
3 Arctic Skua
4 Red-throated Diver
12 Brent Geese (8 dark-belled + 4 light bellied)
c.50 Common Scoter
1 Tree Pipit
4 Pied Flycatcher
1 Spotted Flycatcher
8 Redstart
1 Lesser Whitethroat
2 Garden Warbler
1 Greenshank

75 species in total

But unfortunately missed Honey Buzzard, Corncrake, plus Marsh Warbler & Wood Warbler release by 1 minute disbelief. But hay-ho you can't win them all!

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All the same birds mentioned on Saturday on show again today.
Only addition was a distant fly by Caspian gull
nice to bump into lots of familiar faces including some Gm birders. You know who you are ;)


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Did you see it? It was small and brown and flew that way.........................


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Patrick Earith wrote:

.........and there aren't many days like that in UK birding for me nowadays!


.....couldn't agree more Patrick, a similar picture today with several Wryneck sightings, Curlew Sandpiper, Little Stint and many Whinchat as well as the more usual migrants and more common species you mention. But without a doubt my bird of the day was the Barred Warbler which has been my bogey bird for some time. Today after an early start and a long wait I was rewarded with extended views of the bird in hedges/berry trees opposite the church at Kilnsea.

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Great day at Spurn yesterday. Only my second ever visit. Preparations well under way for the Migration Festival, with plenty of birders about with radios. I parked up just beyond the Crown & Anchor, near to Cliff Farm and within 10 minutes was on to the fantastic Wryneck which was sat on the top of one of trees in the garden. First lifer of the day! It later came down onto the rocks along the seafront giving fantastic views. Just on the mud next to where it was showing and in amongst the Dunlin and Redshank was a Curlew Sandpiper. Next, was a walk of only 20 yards or so up the road towards the point, where, after a lot of hard work, I also managed to pick up the juvenile Barred Warbler in one of the roadside hedges. Second lifer! These hedges were alive with migrants. In the 10 minutes I stood there, I'd seen two male Redstarts, 2 Spotted Flycatchers and a Whitethroat. I then decided to walk up the cliff edge path behind Cliff Farm. Here I saw, amongst the many Meadow Pipits, 3 Whinchat. I also got slightly clearer views of the Barred Warbler, as the back of the hedge which it favoured could be seen from this path, albeit, distantly. I walked up to the hide at Canal Scrape (I think it's called?) Here I had a female Redstart, a Willow Warbler and a female Pied Flycatcher all in the same bush over the back of the scrape and all in the same scope view at the same time. Also present was a Snipe. I then decided to walk back up the road back towards Kilnsea. Along the way, I had another two, really close, female Pied Flycatchers, doing what they do best, from a fence along the roadside as well as another female Redstart. I also had another Whinchat. I then walked up to the Kilnsea Wetlands. Highlights being a juvenile Little Stint and another Curlew Sandpiper. Walking back up the road towards the Crown & Anchor again, I spotted two Wheatear in the ploughed fields then walked back up to just near the barrier to the point and had a quick scan through the wader flocks. Lots of Bar-tailed Godwits, with one or two still in stunning summer plumage. Similarly, a smaller Grey Plover flock, also some summer plumages individuals. Also present were Redshank, Turnstone, Dunlin, Little Egret and Curlew. I also saw my last male Redstart of the day here. No time for any sea watching and, no doubt I still missed loads of other stuff too (apparently, there had been two Wrynecks and 4 Barred Warblers in the vicinity that day) but still a brilliant day, resulting in two lifers. And there aren't many days like that in UK birding for me nowadays!

-- Edited by Patrick Earith on Saturday 6th of September 2014 09:03:07 AM

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steven burke wrote:

had a little 4 day holiday on the east coast, visited spurn on 3 occasions (my first ever visit to here) on sunday, Tuesday & Wednesday, surprised I didn't bump into you tim wink
my best day being Tuesday when I got 3 lifers within 30 mins, the first being a WRYNECK as I was walking up the path along the canal scrape on my way to kew villa, one of the wardens was waving me over as he had just found it sat on a post, got my scope on it whilst the chap called others on his walkie talkie. then at kew villa within 10 minutes I was watching a COMMON ROSEFINCH & ICTIRINE WARBLER biggrinbiggrin
other highlights on the Tuesday amongst the 65 species seen.......

at least 6 pied flycatchers ( doubled that on the Wednesday)
8 whinchats ( at least 12 on the Wednesday)
1 cuckoo
2 garden warblers
30-40 yellow wagtails
4 wheatears
11 little gulls ( 3 on Wednesday)
4 artic skuas, 1 pale phase
swallows, sand martins & house martins all around
willow warblers & whitethroats were all around
3 whimbrel
3 green sandpipers
good numbers of knot on the estuary
also dunlins, bar tailed godwits, redshanks, ringed plovers, golden & grey plovers.
several little egrets around

I did manage to get another brief view of the ictirine warbler on Wednesday.

overall a great trip with 4 lifers, the arctic skuas were lifers also.
I did manage 2 bonxies at flamborough head on Monday with manx shearwaters, but dipped twice on the barred warblers, never mind.


smilesmile





Hi Steve Shame I missed you. I spent a large chunk of my day walking down Spurn itself. Great you got so many lifers. Luckily I'd seen Icterine Warbler singing male before in Bulgaria so I wasn't disappointed to miss it (now if I'd missed one in GM...)

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had a little 4 day holiday on the east coast, visited spurn on 3 occasions (my first ever visit to here) on sunday, Tuesday & Wednesday, surprised I didn't bump into you tim wink
my best day being Tuesday when I got 3 lifers within 30 mins, the first being a WRYNECK as I was walking up the path along the canal scrape on my way to kew villa, one of the wardens was waving me over as he had just found it sat on a post, got my scope on it whilst the chap called others on his walkie talkie. then at kew villa within 10 minutes I was watching a COMMON ROSEFINCH & ICTIRINE WARBLER biggrinbiggrin
other highlights on the Tuesday amongst the 65 species seen.......

at least 6 pied flycatchers ( doubled that on the Wednesday)
8 whinchats ( at least 12 on the Wednesday)
1 cuckoo
2 garden warblers
30-40 yellow wagtails
4 wheatears
11 little gulls ( 3 on Wednesday)
4 artic skuas, 1 pale phase
swallows, sand martins & house martins all around
willow warblers & whitethroats were all around
3 whimbrel
3 green sandpipers
good numbers of knot on the estuary
also dunlins, bar tailed godwits, redshanks, ringed plovers, golden & grey plovers.
several little egrets around

I did manage to get another brief view of the ictirine warbler on Wednesday.

overall a great trip with 4 lifers, the arctic skuas were lifers also.
I did manage 2 bonxies at flamborough head on Monday with manx shearwaters, but dipped twice on the barred warblers, never mind.


smilesmile

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Tim Wilcox wrote:


but best of all I found my own WRYNECK about 500m north of the lighthouse but with no other birders about was the only observer - the rest had gone to Sammy's Point for one there

... The reason there were rather few birders there is you have to walk and it's 3.5 miles from the Observatory car park to the point so a 3 and a half hour, 7 mile round walk even if you don't spend long searching but it makes it gloriously wild with no cars.




Now that is a just reward for the effort you put in, Tim smile

How many time do you put effort in and get no reward, whilst the crowds following each other elsewhere get the stunning views of something!! Nice to see it pay off for once smile

WELL DONE biggrin

-- Edited by Doc Brewster on Thursday 28th of August 2014 09:53:51 AM

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A day trip to Spurn yesterday in glorious weather with a light easterly breeze - perfect

On the estuary at low tiide:
Golden Plover 100s in the heathaze with
Dunlin 100s
Ringed Plover 100s
Redshank 100s
Curlew 50+
Black-tailed Godwit 1 on the beach at Spurn

Pied Flycatcher I saw 10 for the day but there were many more present
Willow Warbler 3 or 4
Whinchat 1
Kestrel 1
Swallows everywhere
but best of all I found my own WRYNECK about 500m north of the lighthouse but with no other birders about was the only observer - the rest had gone to Sammy's Point for one there

An Icterine Warbler was present in the Kew Villa garden in a plum tree. I didn't see it after an hour's vigil but a Garden Warbler was there along with 4 Red Admirals, numerous Speckled Woods and Whites and Migrant Hawkers

Anyone going should be aware that the road has simply gone and Spurn is now an island cut off at high tide. It looks very unlikely to be rebuilt across 500m of wet sand and only RNLI Land Rovers are allowed across. The reason there were rather few birders there is you have to walk and it's 3.5 miles from the Observatory car park to the point so a 3 and a half hour, 7 mile round walk even if you don't spend long searching but it makes it gloriously wild with no cars. The iconic telegraph poles have all been cut down too. I found the Wryneck at 4pm and called it to BirdGuides but with high tide due at 6.30pm I doubt anyone else went to look for it.


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First ever visit to Spurn and not disappointed. Amongst the sunshine, thunder and torrential rain the highlights were undoubtedly Red Breasted Flycatchers and Red backed Shrike. Plenty of other good stuff about including Little and Common Terns Fulmar Dark Bellied Brants Summer Plumage Grey Plover Redstart Garden Warbler Cuckoo Whimbrel

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Had two and a half days last week. No major rarities but plenty common migrants around. Fantastic scope filling views of male and female common redstarts, ring ouzels, cuckoo. Really nice to see loads of waders in breeding plumage too.

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A good day out at Spurn with the Stockport Birding Society produced the following birds of note for myself :-

In the Canal Hedge a Dusky Warbler gave excellent views. A Yellow-browed Warbler and 3 Mealy (Common) Repolls were at the Warren.

A Black Brant was seen at Beacon Ponds along with mainly dark bellied Brent Geese and one pale bellied, 2 Whooper Swans, a juvenile White-fronted Goose, 3 Ringed Plover and an overflying Merlin.

From the Canal Scrape hide Jack Snipe, Water Rail and Greenshank.

At various locations in the area:- Fieldfare, Redwing, Blackcap, Chiffchaff, Goldcrest were seen.

A reported total of 92 species was recorded by the group for the day.




-- Edited by sid ashton on Sunday 20th of October 2013 04:17:14 PM

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An incredible day at Spurn today. I've never seen so many birds, I was spoilt for choice on what to look at through the bins. Highlights were:-

My first Barred Warbler on the lane near Cliff Farm.
My first Dusky Warbler behind Cliff Farm. Only very brief views of this as it was really elusive.
Several Mealy Redpolls - opposite Rose Cottage and Sammy's Point.
Two, possibly three Great Grey Shrikes down the point. Due the road being shut down the point I took my bike which turned out to be better than walking.
Loads of Bramblings at the point.
Quail near the big hedge - bumped into Simon Warford and Melanie Beckford here too.
Hundreds of Goldcrests and Chiffchaffs - every bush seemed to have at least three. The variation in Chiffchaffs was really good to see, ranging from some quite yellow looking birds to some very dark ones.
Thousands of Redwings, Blackbirds, a few Fieldfares - they were absolutely everywhere you looked.

I missed out on one or two birds but I wasn't too bothered as there was that much to look at.


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An excellent spur of the moment trip with John Ireland, with 2 Red-breasted Flycatchers and a Firecrest the highlights. We also picked up a few commoner migrants, including 1 Spotted Flycatcher, 2 Redstarts, 3 Whinchats, 1 Wheatear, 12 Bramblings, 4 Siskins, 7 Swallows, 13 Blackcaps, 10 Chiffchaffs, 1 Merlin, 1 Whimbrel and 1 Arctic Skua. Hundreds of Redwings and scores of Song Thrushes, along with three figure counts of Starlings, Meadow Pipits and Brent Geese were the most obvious arrivals, while a few Greenshanks, Knot, Bar-tailed Godwits, Grey Plover and Sanderling were among the masses of Redshanks, Dunlin, Oystercatchers and Curlews.

Cheers David

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Beacon Lane

Great Snipe showing to about 1 metre
1 Snow Bunting
1 Yellow Wagtail
1 Wheatear

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late report for last two saturdays

Quick blast round with Holly


Highlights were, a few Wrynecks around though we kept missing them, 2 Red Backed Shrike, 2 Rosefinch's behind the church, Juv Hobby, Juv Cuckoo seen not by us, lots of Whinchats, Redstart, Yellow Wagtail, a few Whimbrel, lesser Whitethroat, Arctic skua and Manx Shearwaters on the sea, with a few flocks of Common Scoter and 1 Red Throated Diver, Corncrake was reported and also Little Stint, 1 Mediterranean Gull, Peregrine chasing a Ruff around was good fun, though not for the Ruff though it managed to escape,

Cheers Dennis smile

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After the big fall of migrants here over the weekend I thought I may have missed the boat with most of them. Thankfully, there were still plenty of birds around for today's visit with John Barber for company.

We arrived at six this morning to thick fog and mist which didn't fill us with much hope and after a couple of hours birding down the point we'd only managed a Whinchat and a couple of Wheatears. By 9 am things got better as the fog started to lift and the birds became more active. After checking in at the obs we learned of a Wryneck showing down near the Crown & Anchor pub. We got down there and a few birders were already gathered. The bird was a little elusive but showed itself on and off for ten minutes or so before disappearing again. A walk down the shoreline southwards here then produced the goods with a few Whinchat, a couple of Redstart, a Pied Flycatcher and a cracking Red Backed Shrike. We watched it for a while as it flit around. It caught a bee at one point and ate it full view before relocating to a tree with a male Redstart for company. Back near the pub the Wryneck was down on the beach playing hide and seek in the boulders.

After this we moved up the point to find the Red Breasted Flycatcher near the wire dump. The bird had been reported half an hour previously so hopes were high. After twenty minutes looking and only two Spotted Flycatchers and a fly by Red Backed Shrike on show, a warbler popped up into view. One birder immediately called Icterine and the bird showed for us for about ten minutes on and off before disappearing. A cracking bird to see and much less yellow than the one I saw in Majorca in May.

Making our way back to the car I immediately spotted a flycatcher low down in a bush. Got the bins on it and saw it was the Red Breasted flycatcher we'd initially been looking for. We then 'chased' it around the bushes for the half an hour as it lead us a merry dance. A look for the reported Barred Warbler at the end of the point proved fruitless so we then decided to get some lunch and go back to see the Wryneck again. This turned out to be a great decision as the Wryneck was now giving unbelieveable views as it fed on the verge in front of the pub literally yards from passing cars and photographers. This had to be the most photogenic bird I've ever seen as it was completely unphased by all the activity around it. Definitely now one of my most favourite birds!

Overall today we managed 56 species and personally I scored 3 lifers. Highlights were:

Wryneck
Icterine Warbler
Red Breasted Flycatcher
Two Red Backed Shrikes
Juvenile Cuckoo
Redstarts
Pied Flycatchers
Spotted Flycatchers
Whinchats
Whimbrels
Garden Warblers
Lesser Whitethroats


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A quick two day visit this time. Marsh Warbler at the Warren was the best bird. Quite a few common migrants had arrived - yellow wagtails, sedge warblers, Whitethroats etc. otherwise pretty quiet.

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Don't think I was. Only started seawatching from around 11ish. Dipped!

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No. Left around 2pm on the Friday. There were a couple of guys came in the sea watching hide early morning, but other than that I don't recall seeing too many other birders around. You weren't one of the two were you?

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Craig Higson wrote:

Must have overlapped somewhere Henry! Were you staying in the Obs?





Yep, but don't remember bumping into you. Were you at the log?
Henry.

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Must have overlapped somewhere Henry! Were you staying in the Obs?


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26-27/10/2012 - A busy couple of days with some remnants of the fall earlier on in the week still present and productive seawatching:

8 Little Auks
2 Long-tailed Ducks
7 Scaups
2 Goldeneyes
1 Pintail
23 Eiders
2 Red-breasted Mergansers
25+ Red-throated Divers
1 Canada Goose
28 Pink-footed Geese
7 Dark-bellied Brent Geese
2 Sooty Shearwaters
1 Pomarine Skua
1 Arctic Skua
10+ Bonxies
1 Merlin
2 Woodocks
2 Jack Snipes
2 Ruffs
1 Purple Sandpiper
4 Swallows
3 Waxwings
200+ Redwings
300+ Fieldfares
200+ Blackbirds
1 Ring Ouzel
100+ Robins - also quite a few dead unfortunately
2 Blackcaps
20+ Chiffchaffs
30+ Goldcrests - a few desperately pottering around the beach
3 Tree Sparrows
c100 Bramblings
15 Twites
7 Snow Buntings

-- Edited by Henry Cook on Sunday 28th of October 2012 09:49:21 AM

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A short stay at the Obs turned into two (well 1 1/12) of the best days I've had spurn for a while. Not a huge amount of vis mig, but still quite a few thrushes and robins around. The highlight of the first day was an olive-backed pipit which showed quite well if only for a few minutes. There was quite a bit of movement on the sea both days with all the usual suspects but a leach's petrel, black throated diver and several little auks kept the interest up.



-- Edited by Craig Higson on Friday 26th of October 2012 08:57:52 PM

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I've just seen that Steve. Typical eh? A day took early!

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Shame you didn't stay over to Monday Nick - massive fall overnight! Check the Spurn Bird Obs website sightings.

I've been a few times and experienced big falls - an amazing experience but very weather dependent. It's all about timing (and luck!).

Glad you still enjoyed it though.

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Made my first ever visit to Spurn on Saturday with fellow birder John Barber. As it was my first trip we decided to make it a two dayer by staying over in the rather excellent B & B of Westmere Farm at Kilnsea.

We arrived at the point at around 8.40 on Saturday morning and headed straight to the end for a wander around to see what was about. John has been many times before and remarked that it seemed a little quiet. The weather had not been great of late for any heavy migration but with a nice bright morning we had a good hunt around anyway. News of a Little Auk off shore had John twitching straight away as he was still to see one of these but the term 'a needle in a haystack' flew to mind given the size of the area. After a wander of an hour or so we returned to the car with only Greenfinches, Reed Buntings, Blackbirds, Linnets, Wrens, Stonechats, Robins, Goldcrests and Tits to our tally really. Some very migration was also noted with mostly Meadow Pipits, Skylarks and the like.

Further back down the point we checked out another area where I found a really nice and obliging Rock Pipit on the beach. Whilst a look along the Humber shore produced Curlews, Redshanks, Sanderlings, Turnstones and a few Grey Plovers.

After this we had a quick look over at the canal scrape before heading up to Kilnsea Wetlands. The pools were fairly quiet with only a few mixed gulls and Brent Geese of note. The pool nearest the sea also had three Little Grebe on it too. A Short Eared Owl fresh in off the sea here was the best sight as it got some grief off a Crow. Back towards the car park we caught sight of another Short Eared Owl across the main road before we noticed what was probably the original bird heading our way, with Crow still in tow. Fortunately for us it flew straight towards us and gave us views down to two metres as it flew straight over our heads. Other birds in this area were some fairly large flocks of Golden Plover circling around looking for places to land.

John's advice was then to go and check out the trees in Kilnsea chruchyard and the Crown & Anchor pub. This proved a little fruitless though with only a couple of Goldcrests and a Chiffchaff on show. We then headed over to Sammys Point for lunch and a quick look before heading over to the trees at the Easington Gas terminal. Here we found a nice mixed flock of tits and after much pishing managed to worm out a Willow Warbler and a Chiffchaff. No other warblers present though!

We then received news of a Yellow Browed Warbler down on the point so we headed back down there to look for it. Unfortunately after much hunting around by us and about another twenty birders no sight or sound of the bird could be found. We did manage to find several Goldcrests, a Blackcap and a one eyed Willow Warbler though!!

The next day we awoke to heavy mist but as the light rose so the mist began to break up. Down on the point again there were a good few Redwing about feasting on the hawthorn berries. These were mixed in with good numbers of Blackbirds - all appeared to be new arrivals. A bit of light migration was evident too with fly over Siskin, Pink Footed Geese and huge movements of Wood Pigeons out over the estuary. A short sea watch by the Observatory also produced two Red Throated Divers, two Gannets, several Porpoise and a Grey Seal.

We then mooted our next move and after deciding that it appeared to be another reasonably quiet day we took off early. Our plan was to call in at Anglers Country Park on the way home to see the American Wigeon that had been present for a while.

After one hell of a delay in Hull due to roadworks we finally arrived in foggy Wakefield at around 1.30. We soon located the bird and had good views down to about 20 yards - a new lifer for both myself and John.

Despite it being on the quiet side though we managed 68 species at Spurn. I really enjoyed it over there and will definitely be returning again sometime soon.

A few shots on my flickr page for those interested.



-- Edited by Nick Isherwood on Monday 22nd of October 2012 08:15:07 PM

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I was also there on Saturday, mainly in the High Water hide. It was just an amazing sight to see the (literally) tens of 1000's of waders, Shelducks, Gulls in the area. The other chap in the hide was a member of the 'Friends of Spurn Point' and so had a radio notifying him of the various migrants. Thanks to him for pointing out a Purple Sandpiper and three Med gulls to me. 10 bearded tits (reedlings) were reported - I managed 4 on the friday plus 4 SEO's (all at once), one barn owl, numerous Tree Sparrows, 5 Stonechats, various flocks of Goldcrests and Linnets, 3 sparrowhawks, 2 kestrels.

Also one fox, three hares, one weasel

Some pictures on my Flickr site.

On the way back called at North Cave Wetlands, highlight being a Jack Snipe. Also 5 Pochards, 3 widgeon, 6 Little grebes, 3 GC grebes, 150 greylags, 50 Canada's, one Black swan

regards

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-- Edited by Mark Battersby on Monday 22nd of October 2012 12:53:51 PM

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Late entry from Saturday. Spent the day with Dave Steel, Roy Taylor (Junior and Senior) and a couple of other mates. Did a Visible Migration watch from first light at the Narrow Necks - best birds were a Little Auk at close range on the Humber side, plus an over-flying Wood Lark and few Twite and Bramblings and Swallows. At 9.00 am moved down to the Point where I managed to find a Yellow-browed Warbler among small numbers of Goldcrests, Chiffchaffs and Blackcaps. A Merlin provided additional entertainment, ringing up to try and catch incoming Meadow Pipits. It finally managed to nail one after a long chase and then dropped onto the beach to eat it. Bearded Tits and a couple of Short-eared Owls were other good records before heading off in mid-afternoon.

Cheers David

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day at spurn with ian campbell and beth rhodes
52 species seen including
tawny pipit
yellow browed warbler
great skua
red throated diver
short eared owl
hobby
brent geese
pink footed geese
brambling
redpoll
sanderling
knot
grey and golden plovers
swallow
gannet
common scoter
missed the bearded tit, left it to look for the tawny pipit
missed barred warbler and richards pipit

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On arrival at Spurn at 9.00am it soon became apparent that it was going to be rather quiet - and so it panned out as the day went on. Very few migrants seen all day. But there is always something of interest to see at Spurn. Most activity was over the sea. Cold start but then warm sunshine all day with v.light NW breeze


My day's sightings as follows:
Main highlight were the huge numbers of Little Gulls feeding offshore - Spurn Obs website estimated 5000.
1 Sooty Shearwater
1 Bonxie
20+ Red-throated Diver
lots of Razorbill
3 Eider - all male
c.80 Common Scoter
3 Greylag - new Beacon wetlands
3 Chiffchaff - including 1 bird singing at point
1 Whimbrel - beach at Bluebell - hopping due to injured left leg!
100+ Golden Plover over
1 Spotted Flycatcher - point
3 Swallow
12+ Little Egret
20+ Bar tailed Godwit
c.50+ dark bellied Brent Geese
c.200+ Shelduck
lots of Gannets off shore
2 Coal Tit - rare here!
1 Great Spotted Woodpecker - on telegraph wire near Kew - earlier seen moving north along peninsular
3 Kestrel
1 Sparrowhawk
4 Siskin - churchyard
10+ Tree Sparrow
50+ Goldfinch
Lesser Redpoll - heard overhead only
Wader roost at high tide -good numbers of Knot, Curlew, Oystercatcher, Dunlin, Redshank, Grey Plover, Ringed Plover, Turnstone and Sanderling.
Also seen: Meadow Pipits, Chaffinch, Blue and Great Tit, Wren, Collard Dove, Woodpigeon, Magpie, Carrion Crow, alba Wagtail, Linnet, Greenfinch, 5 Mute Swan, Mallard, Common, Herring, Black-headed, Great and Lesser Black backed Gulls.

No winter thrushes at all!

Mammal sightings:
1 Common Seal - hauled out on beach by lifeboat pier
3 Grey Seal
1 Porpoise
4 Roe Deer - a point dunes and 3 Kilnsea
1 Fox - Kilnsea
1 Hare

also:
1 dead Brown Rat!
1 dead Hedgehog!

Butterflies:
6 Red Admirals
1 Comma
1 Large White

finally: c.80 Pinkfeet NE over M62 at Goole on way home.

-- Edited by Steven Nelson on Sunday 7th of October 2012 10:05:45 PM

-- Edited by Steven Nelson on Monday 8th of October 2012 07:53:39 AM

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